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Author Topic: Mudflap on Bus  (Read 2422 times)
pete81eaglefanasty
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« on: October 11, 2006, 09:12:46 AM »

 I would like to know if any eagle owners or any body else ever try a mudflap across the back of the bus, and if it made it get hot or not. on an eagle model 10 with a 6v92. will it stop throwing rocks up to the towing vehicle, two times I had a  hole in the a/c condenser, last year and again this year on my trip.



             Pete
      fantasy
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WHAT EVER YOU DO, OR TO WHO YOU DO IT TOO, DO IT WITH A SMILE, IT MAKES IT LEGAL THAT WAY.
Eagle
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« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2006, 09:31:58 AM »

Pete I put one on my 85 Eagle 10 and no problems.  Mine was 92" wide and heigth of 8" I hung it just forward of the miter box and about two inches off of the ground.  I also opened the louvers up on the engine door to allow more heat to escape.
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RJ
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« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2006, 04:48:38 PM »

Pete -

GMCs came with a full-width mudflap mounted directly behind the rear axle.  It's purpose was two-fold:  Stop flying debris (rocks, etc.) and create a low-pressure area under the powertrain to increase air movement thru the engine compartment.  Even the RTS transit buses have them.

If you hang a mudflap directly off the back bumper, you'll trap hot air under the rear of the coach, something you don't want to do.

HTH. . .

 Wink
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RJ Long
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skihor
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« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2006, 05:06:42 PM »

I put one across the rear bumper on my MC 5A. BIG MISTAKE. Destroyed the negative air pressure under the engine compartment. Put it behind the rear axle or something on the front of the toad.

Don & Sheila
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David Anderson
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« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2006, 05:45:59 PM »

This subject interests me.  What would be a good and inexpensive substance to use.  8"-12" tall by almost 96" wide directly behind the drive wheels.   Hanging it would be easy.  Finding the material----any suggestions???  Something that someone is discarding would be really nice.

David
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skihor
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« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2006, 06:38:27 PM »

I've heard old conveyer belt can be used??? I wouldn't have a clue where to get it or what it might look like.
I think truck mud flaps would work fairly well behind each set of duals.

Don & Sheila
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buswarrior
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« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2006, 06:45:45 PM »

The ribbed flooring found in transits does a nice job as a mudflap.

Cut to any size you want. Find someone tearing it out. Local rebuilder?

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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Jeremy
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« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2006, 04:38:35 AM »

Conveyor belting is made of two thick sheets of rubber sandwiching a heavy woven core. It is very tough, but thicker and less flexible than regular mudflap material. If you think your mudflap would regularly rub the ground and/or get hit by stones etc it would be a good material to use.

Jeremy
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gumpy
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« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2006, 05:34:53 AM »

Conveyor belt would be my choice. Check with some local gravel companies. When they replace belting, they keep the old stuff to use for repairs. Find a large gravel pit and talk to the owner. Explain the whole bus thing to him. They like big toys, too.

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Craig Shepard
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pete81eaglefanasty
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« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2006, 11:01:27 AM »

  So what do most of you think is better? behind the duals or all the way across
the back. I thank each and every one's comments on this subject. I really want to know which is the best, because it gets expensive  repairing the air conditioner every year. thanks because i'm stuck on which way to go.


     Pete
 Fantasy
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WHAT EVER YOU DO, OR TO WHO YOU DO IT TOO, DO IT WITH A SMILE, IT MAKES IT LEGAL THAT WAY.
Eagle
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« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2006, 11:10:01 AM »

NOT on the rear bumper.  My earlier post I said I mounted mine in front of the miter box and that means toward the front of the coach.  With an 8" high flap you will have air flow over the flap.
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pete81eaglefanasty
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« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2006, 11:17:57 AM »

  Thank you eagle for your answer, I did not mean across the rear bumper, I understood what you said about putting it in front of the miter box.
thanks again for your reply I did understand but I didn't express myself right. thanks again.


     Pete
 fantasy
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WHAT EVER YOU DO, OR TO WHO YOU DO IT TOO, DO IT WITH A SMILE, IT MAKES IT LEGAL THAT WAY.
DrivingMissLazy
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« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2006, 12:59:52 PM »

Pete, based on everything I have read, I think the best place is completely across, directly behind the drivers, in front of the engine.

I did try one in the rear bumper area and it did screw up the cooling on my 80 Eagle.
Richard
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larryh
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« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2006, 11:33:36 AM »

Pete

you can use 3 truck mudflaps and put right in back of drivers, duals and if you put clear across bus you will help create a low pressure area behind the flaps under the engine and help hot air escaping out rear plus stop flying rocks etc.

Most GMC came out with this installed completely across bus.

Larry H
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Fred Mc
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« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2006, 07:11:54 AM »

I have a GM PD4106 and got used conveypr belting installed from the back bumper. I didn't notice any cooling changes or problems. It also didn't stop oil from getting on my trailer(which is why I put it on) so I removed if after a few years.

Fred Mc.
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