Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
September 20, 2014, 11:11:49 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an E-Mag Subscription: It will not turn yellow, get musty, dusty, and mildewed or fade.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 [2] 3  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Wal Mart biodiesel  (Read 2917 times)
rv_safetyman
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2199


Jim Shepherd


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #15 on: October 03, 2011, 06:21:47 AM »

Interesting thread.  We fueled up last week at a pump that had the 5-20% sticker on it.  Did not have a choice.  I was a bit fearful because of the gasoline/ethanol issues.  To my knowledge, this is the first time we filled up with a blended bio-diesel.

After reading this thread, I looked at my VMSpc data and we have used a bit less than 40 gallons since we filled up.  Our tank was a bit less than half full at the fill-up, so the bio fuel is diluted.  

We have a Fuel Pro 382 fuel filter so we can see when the filter needs changing (one of my best purchases for the bus).  I just went out and checked it and did not see any significant change in the fuel level (a measure of used filter capacity).

I did not notice any change in performance or fuel mileage.

I am not worried about my fuel lines, as I ran DOT tubing and Aeorquip AQP hose when I re-plumbed the fuel system.

If I get a chance, I will use bio-blended on my next fill-up and see if the filter capacity gets used up quicker.

The one issue that I am concerned about is gelling.  There were some horror stories a year or two ago about school bus fleets that could not start when the weather turned cold.  Many of the farmers in my wife's home town had problems.

Jim
« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 06:26:57 AM by rv_safetyman » Logged

Jim Shepherd
Evergreen, CO
85 Eagle 10/Series 60/Eaton AutoShift 10 speed transmission
Somewhere between a tin tent and a finished product
Bus Project details: http://beltguy.com/Bus_Project/busproject.htm
Blog:  http://rvsafetyman.blogspot.com/
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12497




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: October 03, 2011, 06:33:22 AM »

I don't buy into the new fuel and the loose of lubricity of the low sulfur fuel stuck injectors on the old 2 strokes are just about a thing of the past very,very seldom does that happen now bet I have only had one here in the since 2008 it was a a common thing in the past with the old fuel not any longer with the 15 or less PPM fuel  

good luck
« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 06:35:20 AM by luvrbus » Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
Bill in KS
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 156





Ignore
« Reply #17 on: October 03, 2011, 06:47:14 AM »

Just a little more food for thought. 




thxs
Bill in KS
Logged

PD4104-4797 in SE Kansas
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6785





Ignore
« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2011, 07:51:15 AM »

The interesting thing about the new ultra low sulfur Diesel (15 ppm) is that the engines that need to run that fuel have the tightest, highest fuel injection pressures ever.  Detroit Diesel's DD engines run 20,000lb of rail pressure and then the individual fuel injectors are HEUI injectors running off the high pressure fuel to bump the tip pressure up to 32,000lbs.  If Detroit thought that the fuel wasn't sufficient to lubricate the injectors, believe me they would be the first to acknowledge the problem and insist on using fuel additive (DD fuel injectors are $775.00 ea exchange!).  While it is true that fuel additive will boost performance a bit, and most importantly disperse water during winter, needing to add more lubrication is just not needed.  As compared to the new Detroit DD13, DD15, DD16, our fuel injectors are very loosy goosy with plenty of clearance to be lubricated by the new Diesel Fuels. Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6785





Ignore
« Reply #19 on: October 03, 2011, 08:12:17 AM »

Some interesting reading about how Rudolph Diesel envisioned using Coal tar to power his engine, but the technology wasn't there yet-hence his engines ran on vegetable oil.  Even then, Diesel didn't like the petroleum industry-making an engine that ran on vegetable oils.  Good Luck, TomC
http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi1435.htm
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
Utahclaimjumper
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 838




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: October 03, 2011, 09:52:40 AM »

Bill in KC,, needs to do some more reading. Sulphur has NEVER, provided, or added to, the lubricity in diesel fuel.. The reason todays lubricity is low is due to the METHOD used to remove it.. The METHOD is what removes the lubricity, and therfore has to added later down the line.>>Dan
Logged

Utahclaimjumper 
 EX 4106 (presently SOB)
Cedar City, Ut.
 72 VW Baja towed
Bill in KS
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 156





Ignore
« Reply #21 on: October 03, 2011, 10:16:37 AM »

I've attached a photo showing straight from the pump diesel burnt and the other tube is straight from the pump diesel that has been treated and burnt. 

Why would you want the byproducts ( carbon / nitric acid)  in your motor / exhaust when you can eliminate it / gain MPG and keep your motor &  oil much cleaner. 




thxs
Bill in KS
Logged

PD4104-4797 in SE Kansas
Bill in KS
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 156





Ignore
« Reply #22 on: October 03, 2011, 10:22:20 AM »

Interesting article concerning sulfur in diesel fuel:
http://www.tdi-issues.com/problems-tac69/lubricity-of-ulsd-diesel-gap168.htm

Another interesting article:
http://www.biodiesel.org/pdf_files/fuelfactsheets/Lubricity.PDF

thanks
Bill in KS
Logged

PD4104-4797 in SE Kansas
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12497




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: October 03, 2011, 10:32:47 AM »

Me I am going to set back and wait till all the commercial air line start using the Bio fuels if the jets don't fall from the sky maybe.

Jim I would be terrified of Bio where you live that why all the new trucks have a heater that run the Bio in cold weather climates here in AZ you cannot buy it after Dec 1 till Mar 30 and we aren't even cold except the mornings

good luck
« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 10:39:07 AM by luvrbus » Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
Busted Knuckle
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6447


6 Setras, 2 MCIs, and 1 Dina. Just buses ;D


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #24 on: October 03, 2011, 10:39:59 AM »

Me I am going to set back and wait till all the commercial air line start using the Bio fuels if the jets don't fall from the sky maybe

good luck

I like that one Clifford! Please just do us a favor and keep a close watch out for us as to who start using it first so we can hold off flying with them until it's proven safe! Wink
Grin  BK  Grin
Logged

Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
Bill in KS
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 156





Ignore
« Reply #25 on: October 03, 2011, 10:46:38 AM »

Utahclaimjumper / Dan  : I stand corrected.  I will use the words : aromatic compounds .  Smiley


Thanks
Bill in KS

Logged

PD4104-4797 in SE Kansas
wal1809
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1330




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: October 03, 2011, 12:49:44 PM »

You mean like this jet?

http://www.gizmag.com/go/8204/
Logged

1984 Silver Eagle Model 10 6V92 Allison auto tranny
www.snakebreaker.com
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12497




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: October 03, 2011, 02:13:04 PM »

Nope Wayne I talking about a real plane carrying 300 or 400 people the engine in that plane will burn anything combustible and a lot of it  lol

good luck  
« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 02:19:04 PM by luvrbus » Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
gus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3510





Ignore
« Reply #28 on: October 03, 2011, 03:13:23 PM »

Because fuel lines fail a short time after beginning to use biodiesel is not proof that BD caused the problem. The fuel lines could have been on the road to failure BD or not. You will never know, this is not exactly good science!!

That is kind of like saying your cold got better because you took some kind of cold medicine when it probably would have gotten better on its own anyway!! You will never know for sure!!

I have no doubt that ethanol is a poor fuel but I've seen nothing yet convincing me that BD causes any problems.
Logged

PD4107-152
PD4104-1274
Ash Flat, AR
Charles in SC
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 297




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: October 03, 2011, 06:51:56 PM »

I started this thread because I read several years ago on this forum that bio was fine in the old Detroits but that rubber parts could fail such as fuel lines, seals, o-rings etc. It seems that the world has not ended yet and most of the responders so far are concerned about their mileage rather than their rubber parts. I replaced my fuel lines when I got my bus with new Aeroquip lines and I hope these are ok with the bio because pure diesel is getting harder and harder in my area. I have a new VW Jetta TDI and VW says not to use bio because there is no way to know what the bio part of the fuel is from, some are ok and some maybe not. Lets see 1 percent of 7 mpg is .07 mpg. I am not sure I can measure that.
Logged

S8M 5303 built in 1969, converted in 2000
Pages: 1 [2] 3  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!