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Author Topic: Navigator Seating  (Read 2547 times)
Tikvah
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« on: October 14, 2011, 09:16:13 AM »

My wife wants me to find a navigator seat for two.  Someplace I've seen one that swivels. She wants to be able to sit up front with grandkid - dog - etc.

The thought makes sense and we're early enough in the conversion to make it fit.  But I don't know where to find such a thing, I don't even know what to call it.

Any ideas?

Dave
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I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2011, 09:27:57 AM »

  Good thread question, I been thinking about that too. Im curious as well, how others feel about a fold down floor panel over the stair well for your feet. Then the Nav seat could slide forward so they can be right up there.
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Tikvah
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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2011, 09:38:43 AM »

My first thought about sliding the seat forward would be visibility of the driver out the right side. 
I'd be interested to know if there would be any significant interference.

My wife says she doesn't want to be that close to that huge windshield... she already feels like she's going to fly though.   Grin

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I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2011, 10:21:38 AM »

  My Dad always had the co-pilot seat; my wife was never comfortable up there anyway so his position was always safe. But being legally blind Dad really couldnt offer any Nav help, and if he ever said an intersection was "clear", you damned sure didnt want to go without looking yourself, lol. I told her she earned that seat through attrition and I wasnt riding up there all alone. She rode shotgun up and back when we took Dad "home", and by the time we got back she was used to it and didnt mind it anymore.

  Of course in that Bounder your sitting back 5 feet from the windshield, in the Bus its 3 feet shorter and your right up with your face against the glass.  I dont know how she'll react to being "that" close. Maybe nudge it up lil by lil over time?

  As long as I can see the mirrors and around someones head im pretty comfortable. Its when they have to bob their head back and forth within my line of sight or block the mirror that I get vocal.

 
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bigjohnkub
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« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2011, 10:24:44 AM »

On my gmc pd4905 I used a seat out of a cab tractor, others us different types. I just wanted to caution you that a seat belt is required In Texas an probably other states. Most important is that the seat be secured to the frame or structure of the bus. You, and now her are the first one to the wreck. Plan for the worst, and hope it never happens.
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Big John  Tyler Tx PD 4903-188 & 4107
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Uglydog56
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« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2011, 10:58:22 AM »

My copilot seat is a two-person like your are discussing.  It even reclines and has armrests like a car seat only wider.  I will talk to the PO and see where he got it from.
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Rick A. Cone
Silverdale, WA
66 Crowny Crown "The Ark"
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« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2011, 11:10:16 AM »

When I redid the interior of my Courier 96, I got an original passenger seat for that bus and had it reupholstered. It is quite comfortable. I fitted it with 2 sets of lap belts.

JC
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JC
Invermere, BC
1977 MC5C, 6V92/HT740
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« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2011, 12:03:53 PM »

A schoolie or transit seat comes to mind to be about the size style your looking for. Just have it recovered to your liking of material, and firmness and you should be all set! (or is that "sit"?+
Grin  BK  Grin
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
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Scott Bennett
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« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2011, 12:19:44 PM »

We put her seat right next to mine with the allison auto shifter between us. Seat swivels completely around and locks in place to face either the windshield or the living area. We cut out the old stainless stairs at the entrance and I built a new wooden spiral stairway into the coach directly to the door side of her seat. Works great, unique layout, and she's right next to me instead of a country mile away Smiley She loves it, so do I. At that point, there's no need for a foot rest over the stairs either. Just a thought  Smiley
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Scott & Heather
1984 MCI9 6V92-turbo with 9 inch roof raise & conversion in progress.
http://www.scottmichaelbennett.com/p/our-bus.html
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« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2011, 12:23:32 PM »

Just brainstorming here...  I'm thinking about getting get a pair of coach seats (with the lift-up) armrest in the middle and reconfiguring the base to attach to a swivel?
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Dave5Cs
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« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2011, 12:35:07 PM »

Didn't the old GMC 70's area rv's have a double seat on the passengers side that turned around?

DaVE
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« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2011, 02:11:07 PM »

The 4104 had the seat just aft of the front wheel well and my wife liked it.

The 4107 has the seat just forward of the wheel well and she does not like it as much.

Visibility from a bus is never a problem anywhere near the front.

I don't like this seat any nearer the front than necessary. It is less safe and much hotter in hot weather.

Can't think of a single advantage in having it all the way forward.
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PD4107-152
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Ash Flat, AR
jbnewman
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« Reply #12 on: October 14, 2011, 02:15:40 PM »

We put her seat right next to mine with the allison auto shifter between us. Seat swivels completely around and locks in place to face either the windshield or the living area. We cut out the old stainless stairs at the entrance and I built a new wooden spiral stairway into the coach directly to the door side of her seat. Works great, unique layout, and she's right next to me instead of a country mile away Smiley She loves it, so do I. At that point, there's no need for a foot rest over the stairs either. Just a thought  Smiley

Do you have any pictures?

-jbn
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-jbn
Justin
Chicago, Illinois

No bus.
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« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2011, 02:35:42 PM »

Didn't the old GMC 70's area rv's have a double seat on the passengers side that turned around?

DaVE

My Father bought a 73 GMC 260 and it had a swivel drivers seat and a fixed double buddy seat on the right side. Behind it was a dinette that was a good 2.5 feet lower so there was nothing to swivel to.

Brice
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1980 MCI-9 "The Last Resort" Located just south of Atlanta GA.
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Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2011, 03:26:47 PM »

On my gmc pd4905 I used a seat out of a cab tractor, (snip)

     Yeah, that's what I have planning (two of them).  My bus had a passenger entry "ramp" coming up from the left side (the driver sits on the right) so I had to build a false floor on the passenger side.  I already have a "spider" of 2x1 steel tubing to support the base for that seat (the driver's base will sit on the stock driver's base).  The navigator's seat is just a little back from the driver's; there's a very large window next to it.

     But I've noticed that about '08 Buicks (and maybe other GM cars) have a split 1/3 and 2/3 seat.  If I were to use those with a suitable base, they could swivel and use the stock electric tilt and recline controls.  They also have the seat belts built into the frame of the seat; that's good and really comfortable but of course the base will have to be sturdy enough to be "crashworthy" for the seat, occupant, and belt loads.

     Dunno what I'm going to do.  I should make up my mind cause I'm about there. 

BH NC USA
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
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bottomacher
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« Reply #15 on: October 14, 2011, 03:27:10 PM »

Texas is the first state I've heard of that requires a seat belt in an antique or in a bus that were factory built without them. Wonder if they require crash testing of the mounting bolts? I thought it was a federal requirement, if at all, and not up to the states.
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usbusin
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« Reply #16 on: October 14, 2011, 03:50:56 PM »

artvonne asks;   Im curious as well, how others feel about a fold down floor panel over the stair well for your feet.

In our 4014 we covered the stair well.  I put a piano hinge at floor level on the front dash and fastened a piece of 1" plywood to the piano hinge.  The plywood rested on a 1" x 1" angle at the rear of the stair well.  A gas strut held the plywood in the upright position when you were parked.  Simple, effective and kept the passenger from falling into the step well!
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Gary D

USBUSIN was our 1960 PD4104 for 16 years Ustruckin' is our 2001 Freightliner truck conversion
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« Reply #17 on: October 14, 2011, 04:59:45 PM »

Similar to USbusin, we have a hinged panel that comes down to cover the stairwell.  It is just held up with a hook and eye though.  You must remember to lift it when getting out though.  Otherwise it is a long way down.  Anyway, that puts her seat slightly aft of the driver.  No complaints so far.
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #18 on: October 14, 2011, 07:36:03 PM »

We also have a hinged panel for the stairwell. It stays in the up position with the use of a magnet. One thing we have noticed is that in a cold climate if we have it down it helps keep cold air from coming into the bus. Smiley  The co-pilot seat also turns around so we can use it for the desk that is right behind it. I am sitting in it as i type this. Smiley
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1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
Seayfam
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« Reply #19 on: October 14, 2011, 08:44:24 PM »

Here are some pics of how our bus is set up. The passanger seat is mounted on a hydraulic ram that is connected to a 12v hydraulic pump. I have a switch mounted on the dash with a up and down position. You just raise the seat up, swing it forward and then let it down right next to the driver seat. When you are done you just return it to the living room furniture.


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Gary Seay (location Alaska)
1969 MCI MC-6 unit# 20006
8V92 turbo 740 auto
more pics and information here     "  www.my69mci-6.blogspot.com  "
Tikvah
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« Reply #20 on: October 15, 2011, 03:57:55 AM »

Quote
The passenger seat is mounted on a hydraulic ram that is connected to a 12v hydraulic pump. I have a switch mounted on the dash with a up and down position. You just raise the seat up, swing it forward and then let it down right next to the driver seat. When you are done you just return it to the living room furniture.


That sounds so incredibly cool that I just have to see it. Any chance you could shoot a video of that?  I'd like to see that in person.  That's the kind a gadget magic I could really get into.

Dave
« Last Edit: October 15, 2011, 03:59:31 AM by Tikvah » Logged

I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
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« Reply #21 on: October 15, 2011, 10:02:48 AM »

Dave,
I would love to shoot a video of how it works, but I live in Alaska and have the bus wrapped, blocked and the batteries removed for the winter. This is a really simple build if you have any fabrication experience. If you have an old snow plow laying around that you don't use because of global warming.  (You have all the parts right there) If you look at the first picture, you will see the ram is mounted right behind the driver seat and in my bus is bolted in the front side of the wheelwell. You have to get that mounted in the right position so the arm will clear everything and set the chair right next to you. You will see in the first picture, the step has a bevel on the right side. That is so the arm doesn't hit the step when you let it down. 

My wife really loves this feature. My father in law likes it too. I was driving the bus in northern Idaho (lots of rednecks there) and my father in law wanted to try the chair out. I let him for awhile and got some funny looks. Needless to say I raised that chair in a hurry and put him back in behind me. LOL!
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Gary Seay (location Alaska)
1969 MCI MC-6 unit# 20006
8V92 turbo 740 auto
more pics and information here     "  www.my69mci-6.blogspot.com  "
Scott Bennett
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« Reply #22 on: October 16, 2011, 06:02:39 AM »

in response to jbnewman, here are the photos of my side stairwell mod. It's not complete, so please ignore the unfinished carpet, trim, vinyl, and spray foam.  Undecided The seat is not locked into it's straight mode, so it looks like it's turned and leaning...ignore that too. This is just proof of concept. Anyway, the seats are mucho comfortable and I now have my cute wife right next to me so we can sail into the sunset holding hands...until the driver next to me cuts me off and I need both hands on the wheel... Undecided







Auto shifter underneath the center armrests along with Pbrake.
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Scott & Heather
1984 MCI9 6V92-turbo with 9 inch roof raise & conversion in progress.
http://www.scottmichaelbennett.com/p/our-bus.html
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« Reply #23 on: October 17, 2011, 03:29:55 PM »

I owned a 1979 Itasca (Winnebago) and it had a double passenger seat with two seat belts, it swiveled so you could have it face backward and I believe it could be laid flat for a small bed. (I could be wrong about the flat part) Anything is possible with a little steel, a welder and a good upholstery guy or you could hunt down an old Itasca motor home...
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Fraser Field
Deroche, BC, Canada
Where the milk cows out number the people, but they can't vote
1972 Prevost, Detroit 8-71/740 Allison automatic, Jakes
Hobbies: restoring classic cars, www.oldambulance.com, arranging old car tours: www.coasters2010.com, www.canadiancoasters.ca
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