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Author Topic: Securing tanks?  (Read 1099 times)
Danny
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« on: October 15, 2006, 12:36:47 AM »

Just purchased water/sewage tanks (100 gallon, plastic).  Any suggestions on how to secure the tanks in the bays?

Thanks as always,
Danny
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Dave Siegel
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« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2006, 04:33:00 AM »

Danny,
I built 3/4" plywood enclosures that surround the sides of the tanks only. No bottom and no top. I used a thin piece of styrofoam between the bay floor and the tank bottom. (The weight of the tank adjusts better with that little cushion.) I put the tanks into the boxes and slid the assemblies into the bay one by one. I fastened cleats to the out side of the boxes to the floor of the bay. That will hold the tanks in place and keep them from sliding. I pre-cut access slots and holes for drain valves and a sight glass to tell me the quantity in the tanks. If you plan to use electric sensors, leave access holes for any service issues. The plywood keeps the tanks from bulging on the sides. You could put a top on it if you need that area for storage. Our bays were small so I can't put anything on top, anyhow.

The plywood dresses up the compartment and gives you something to install a paper towel holder to, or any other implements that you may need. Or to dress it up with trunk carpet.

Good luck.

Dave Siegel, Naples, FL PD 3751  "Silversides"
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FloridaCliff
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« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2006, 05:29:08 AM »

Danny,

I also wrapped my tanks in 3/4 plywood.

I put plywood on the top and bottoms.  I have a little headroom above mine and made use of that space for storage.

Follow Daves advice on the holes and service stuff.  Much harder to do as an afterthought!

I painted them to match the battleship Gray of the walls in my bays.

Pay special attention to the length of any screws you use to attach stuff.  Grin

I used counter sunk hardware through the plywood base and sides to secure the box around the tanks.

The plywood also protects from any accidental puntures.

It doesn't take alot to hold them if they are in the plywood surround.  They will bulge without the plywood.

Best of luck,

Cliff
« Last Edit: October 15, 2006, 10:02:25 AM by FloridaCracker » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2006, 07:39:09 AM »

Just a thought if you dont want to make a site glass.  Mount a lite aginst the top of the tank and shade it from the face of the tank your standing on.  It will iluminate the inards and you can see the level of the tank without extra protrusions.  I have plastic tanks already installed and reach back with a flash light.  it would be simple to add an led puck light or somthing to the top while they're out.  If your going to put plywood in front of them then leave a slot showing the plastic wall and the lite behind the plywood


also from my experience being only these tanks that were already in my bus.

-   Tilt them to the dump side!!!!!!  that last little bit takes forever to dump,  mine are rectangular too.

-  use Unioins!! so if you ever do have to take them out you don't have to replumb.  and you may want to entertain some flexible joints to take the stress off the plumbing while traveling.

- make sure black and grey are vented through the roof.  (grey stinks pretty bad too  trust me on that one Shocked)

Good luck and let us know what you come up with.

 Cool

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H3Jim
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« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2006, 07:53:48 AM »

Danny,
I did mine the ame way as the tohers, plywood box around them with cleats on the bottom.  Because mne were tall, 27", and next to my generator quiet box, I also srapped a piece of steel around the box so any bulge would not distort into teh quiet box. 

The owner at Ronco plastics, the people that make the roto-molded poly tanks, said that while he has never seen one of his poly tanks break, he has seen the bigger ones bulge as much as 5 inches.  My tnaks have been in for sevaral years and 20,000 miles and I have had no issues at all.  Good idea to make things accessable for service later if required.

Good luck and keep us posted.
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« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2006, 08:17:11 AM »

Secure them?  Where they going to go?

All I did on mine was build a frame with 1/2" angle iron around the edge to set them in it. The frame is bolted to the floor, but the tanks just sit in the frame with no fasteners or straps. Granted, my tanks are welded and have square corners, so they sit right down in there and don't need extra support around them. Yours may. I understand some of the rotational molded tanks are pretty flimsy and require a plywood box to keep them from collapsing.

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Craig Shepard
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« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2006, 10:16:17 AM »

Danny,

Craig brings up a good point about the thickness of the tanks.

I dont know about yours, but many of the RV products I have seen are very thin.

I wouldn't consider putting one of these type in without an outer shell of plywood. 

Mine were custom made aftermarket of the heavy duty variety, but my fresh water spans the bus side to side and I would be uncomfortable without the

plywood box around it.  Thats alot of pressure on it when full.  The box helps spread the load.

It will also ad a margin of protection against an accidental punture.  Which on the right tank it could be a real mess.   Tongue

If possible in your layout I would put them against a forward bulkhead.  Probably the maximum force against them will be when braking, when full.

Just a few additonal ideas

Cliff
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« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2006, 10:16:44 AM »

Gumpy- highly recommend you put some sort of strapping over the tanks just to hold them in.  If you do an emergency maneuver with the tanks on the full side, they could "jump" out of the angle iron-and I know you wouldn't be pleased with that.  Just a suggestion.  Good Luck, TomC
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Danny
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« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2006, 06:39:50 PM »

THANKS GUYS!  Good ideas   Grin

Danny
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