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Author Topic: What the heck is happening with diesel prices?  (Read 7011 times)
luvrbus
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« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2011, 10:22:37 AM »

I think you are wrong there Jon do a little research lol started out that way with Marathon as the major owner now belongs to CVC,Road Ranger and Town Pump.

It is privately held now but I was told it is going public in 2012

good luck
« Last Edit: November 12, 2011, 10:49:57 AM by luvrbus » Logged

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Seayfam
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« Reply #16 on: November 12, 2011, 10:38:55 AM »

This is my take on some of it... About 6 years ago Diesel was on the average 80 cents a gallon cheaper than gasoline. At the same time Diesel vehicles got about 1/3 better mileage than gasoline. So at that time, it only made sense to own a Diesel. With oil prices on the rise, people and auto manufacturers were catching on real fast. The auto industries were producing more and more Diesels and people were buying more and more Diesels. Then the EPA kicked in and thought that Diesels were warming up the earth. They decided we needed a cleaner Diesel (ULSD) and the manufactures weren't set up to produce enough to keep up with the  new high demand of Diesel. Not to mention the higher costs to refine it. And above all this the EPA wanted all our Diesels to emit less pollutants, which in turn sent our mileage plummeting.  So I believe that now we have a lot more Diesels on the road, with your latter model ones less efficient, and with the higher costs to manufacture it, we pay more than gasoline.

It sucks, but this is why I believe "WE PAY MORE FOR DIESEL" than gasoline.
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Gary Seay (location Alaska)
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« Reply #17 on: November 12, 2011, 10:46:33 AM »

The vast majority of diesel use is in commercial service where the buyer has no choice.  It is pay the price or go out of business.
I don't think that automobiles, RV's or pleasure boats are going to have much impact whether they buy fuel or not.
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« Reply #18 on: November 12, 2011, 11:58:01 AM »

I think you are wrong there Jon do a little research lol started out that way with Marathon as the major owner now belongs to CVC,Road Ranger and Town Pump.

It is privately held now but I was told it is going public in 2012

good luck

Wrong. Pilot bought out Marathon's 1/2 interest in 1988. In 2001 Pilot went 50 / 50 with Speedway Super America (a subsidiary of Marathon Ashland a joint venture between Marathon and Ashland Petroleum) in a joint venture to create travel centers under the Pilot Name. That joint venture in travel centers is not ownership of the corporation or its convenience stores / gas stations.

PIlot is a big deal here in Knoxville and everything relating to the company is reported in great detail.
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Jon Wehrenberg
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luvrbus
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« Reply #19 on: November 12, 2011, 12:03:41 PM »

Maybe so but did they tell you CVC just pumped another 180mil into it lol they have a 440 mil 62% stake in Pilot,the C stores are owned by RoadRanger and PumpTown 

I have no idea where you come up with Pilot buying Marathon in 1988 Marathon and Pilot started the Travel Centers together in 2001 when Marathon sold Pilot then sold 47.5% to CVC that brought their share to 52.5 % CVC owns control with 62% now
« Last Edit: November 12, 2011, 01:16:47 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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prevosman
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« Reply #20 on: November 12, 2011, 12:13:41 PM »

Maybe so but did they tell you CVC just pumped another 180mil into it lol they have a 440 mil stake in Pilot

good luck

Sure would like to see the source of your knowledge of Pilot. Nothing in a Google search turned up any information about CVC (whoever that is) or anyone else having a stake in PIlot.
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Jon Wehrenberg
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« Reply #21 on: November 12, 2011, 12:18:42 PM »

I know to go a thousand miles in a camper with a diesel that gets 5mpg at 4 bucks a gal is 800 bucks.


A plastic camper getting 8mpg at 3.25 for gasoline would need just a tad more than half that, 406 dollars.

The cost of letting one sit is significantly lower as well.

Fuel prices are going to all but kill this hobby for average folks.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2011, 12:41:40 PM »

How about a 3 third quarter report from from CVC,I just checked on Google and Wiki had the info not up to date but shows CVC,RoadRanger and Town Pump.

I really don't care I never stop at one because they are always so nasty,but I do keep track of CVC Holding (who ever they are) for personal reasons
« Last Edit: November 12, 2011, 01:22:10 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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« Reply #23 on: November 12, 2011, 12:44:00 PM »

Mexico has a nationalized oil co they flock across our boarder to buy diesel and gasoline because it cheaper here
 Pilot and Flying J are like every thing else here they are not owned by Americans but by the English.

It wasn't all that long ago that fuel prices in Mexico were much lower than in the USA.  I know there were busnuts on this board that traveled into Mexico to buy the cheaper diesel.  People who live along the Mexico border were traveling into Mexico and buying as much fuel as they could to save money.

For me personally, I bought my bus back in 2006 when the economy was going strong and diesel was around $2.30 a gallon.  Fast forward five years and the economy is in the dumps and diesel costs over $4 a gallon.  I still have my job, but my expenses keep going up with no pay increase since 2007.  Several of my friends who have gone on trips in the past can't go as they have been unemployed for many months.

For me there is no other type of RV that could offer the same type of experience and get better MPG.  I already get 7 MPG pulling a heavy trailer and 8 MPG with no trailer.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #24 on: November 12, 2011, 12:54:41 PM »

Regular high sulfur diesel was 2.80 a gal in Sept 11 ULSD was about 3.72 if you could find it Mexico gasoline was higher than diesel it goes up a couple of cents a gal per day I noticed
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« Reply #25 on: November 12, 2011, 01:22:04 PM »

Uhhhh... Just for what it's worth, we are paying the equivalent of U. S. $2.70 per gallon for diesel fuel down here, and the price goes up a few cents just about every month. Gasoline is about 7% cheaper than diesel.

One of our problems here in Mexico (same goes for U. S.) is that we have had no new refineries built since the eighties, and are now having to export our oil to get it refined, and then re-import it.
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Dr. Steve, San Juan del Río, Querétaro, Mexico, North America, Planet Earth, Milky Way.
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« Reply #26 on: November 12, 2011, 02:33:10 PM »

It doesn't look like it is going to get better. Obama just put a hold on the pipeline from Alberta to Texas for the tar sands oil so now the emphasis in Canada has shifted to shipping it to the west coast for shipping to China. They seem to want all we can send them. You can thank the enviros for that.
If you want to see a funny interview with a Wall Street occupier (in Canada) watch this video. Its pricelss and typical.

Go to http://smalldeadanimals.com/ and scroll down to "Uccupied in Regina"
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Kubla
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« Reply #27 on: November 12, 2011, 02:49:32 PM »

Yes they do ship tankers loaded with ULSD to Europe, been happening since the EPA forced the European fuel standard on the US.
Every time the wholesale cost of diesel is a couple cents lower in the US than Europe, the brokers by a hundred million gallons on the market and load it into the tankers going back across the atantic for more crude and off load it in europe, it cost them about 1 cent a gallon to ship it back by the tanker load so with a couple of cents profit on each gallon, they are making at least $100K each time, which is why diesel stays up in price
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« Reply #28 on: November 12, 2011, 03:27:59 PM »

It doesn't look like it is going to get better. Obama just put a hold on the pipeline from Alberta to Texas for the tar sands oil so now the emphasis in Canada has shifted to shipping it to the west coast for shipping to China. They seem to want all we can send them. You can thank the enviros for that.
If you want to see a funny interview with a Wall Street occupier (in Canada) watch this video. Its pricelss and typical.

Go to http://smalldeadanimals.com/ and scroll down to "Uccupied in Regina"


Don't believe for even a second that, the pipeline was for bringing Canadian oil south,Texas is full of oil that can't get into a refinery, the big company's are building storage facility all over South Texas,for the oil that's coming up with the Natural gas, is dam ne'er a waste product for them, bought the same deal here in N. Dakota, the Chinese have invested 20 billion with a certain company in the last two years,
I am betting that pipeline is for going north more than south, they have already built a line to the west coast and been sending tar sand oil thru B.C 
Hate to say it but those enviros may have done us a favor this time.
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Box Elder,S.D.  Battle Mountain,NV


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« Reply #29 on: November 12, 2011, 04:15:09 PM »

The vast majority of diesel use is in commercial service where the buyer has no choice.  It is pay the price or go out of business.
I don't think that automobiles, RV's or pleasure boats are going to have much impact whether they buy fuel or not.

  Bowl Slobber. While the possibility of ever getting a group of Americans involved enough to do anything productive is moot, the impact would, or could be staggering. If enough systems back up it would deeply effect commercial operations.

  As a mental exercise, imagine everyone in the country stayed home Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday next week, and didnt drive anywhere, and did not buy any fuel ahead of time. In fact, imagine everyone kept their lights and TV's off as much as possible, and just sat back for those days and read a book. Maybe to really expand on this, imagine everyone fasted for 3 days. So they not only aren't going to the store or burning fuel, they aren't eating anything. Walmart is open on Monday, but nobodies there. Flying J's are open, but the only customers are truckers because everyone else stayed home. Oh wait a minute, nobody showed up for work Monday, so the only ones working at Walmart and Flying J are managers.

  By Wednesday the President would be on TV SCREAMING for people to come back to work and get out there and "buy some fuel". Oil tankers would be backing up in our ports, Semi's would be backed up at Walmart, Tanker trucks would be backed up at Flying J. Refineries would be so backed up with Gas and Diesel they wouldn't know what to do with it all. Power companies would have to ramp down their plants because demand would fall off so sharply. Natural Gas and Coal deliveries would start to back up. Congressmen and TV reporters would be analyzing the reasons and the impacts. It would be a real game changer. And once the Big boys realized the people had that kind of power, a lot of other things would change.

  But its never going to happen, because you, and I, and all those guys over there, and those guys over there, and everyone else are never going to try. Never. But we could.
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