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Author Topic: Anybody heard of a safety problem with RV propane bottles?  (Read 2021 times)
Mex-Busnut
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« on: November 21, 2011, 07:48:57 PM »

The story is here:

http://www.rvtravel.com/blog/rvnow/2008/05/rv-safety-alert-could-save-life-and.html

The link that the story mentions where they got the story does NOT work.

« Last Edit: November 21, 2011, 07:54:46 PM by Mex-Busnut » Logged

Dr. Steve, San Juan del Río, Querétaro, Mexico, North America, Planet Earth, Milky Way.
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« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2011, 10:08:37 PM »

  I have to plead ignorance, I know absolutely nothing about Meth, what it is, looks like, or how they make it. But im learning and its really aggrevating. The only reason people are doing it is because they cant have pot. If they were stoned enough they wouldnt want Meth and wouldnt have the ambition or motivation to try.

  Never heard this about propane bottles but I guess the morons will try whatever gets the job done. Another thing to have to watch.
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Brassman
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« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2011, 10:44:49 PM »

Meth ain't pot, more like the opposite. Some call 'em meth maggots. Pot heads aren't going to steal your copper wires, radiators, grave markers, etc., too much work for a stoner.
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Nusa
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« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2011, 05:07:54 AM »

Meth process aside, your subject is really about the mis-use of propane containers. It doesn't really matter WHY it was abused, only that it was abused before you got your hands on it. And, clearly, the way to completely avoid that risk is to only refill your own tanks rather than exchange them.

Anhydrous ammonia. Anhydrous means without-water, 100% ammonia (The ammonia you buy as a cleaning product would be less than a 10% solution in water), which would be a gas at room temperatures and has storage characteristics similar to propane. It's toxic, flammable, explosive and could even be used as a fuel, just a lot less energy than propane (10K vs 90K BTU/lb). Some of those large propane-like tanks you see on farms are actually ammonia tanks, obviously without brass fittings. Anhydrous ammonia would be highly corrosive to brass fittings, although it would likely last long enough for a propane tank jury-rig situation like drug dealers might use. So if it's true these containers are re-entering the market without proper inspection, the risk is there.

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robertglines1
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« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2011, 05:23:10 AM »

true;why do you think they return for fresh/undamaged-noncorroded tank.  They could care less about next user.  Been common knowledge in farm belt for many years.  You can find them along roadsides and tossed in fields.     Bob
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« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2011, 07:46:38 AM »

Because of this mentioned reason, and that there are no inspections necessary, I use chassis mount tanks.  Then I know where it came from and who (meaning me) used them.  Good Luck, TomC
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« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2011, 03:18:47 PM »

Why do you need to use chassis mount tanks to know the history of your propane tanks?  Buy new 20/30/40lb propane tanks and never exchange them.  I have three 20lb propane tanks that I bought new.

When I use the bus I almost always bring these three propane tanks with me for my outdoor stoves and grill.  I get them filled at a Flying J as they only charge for teh amount they put in it.  Most local propane places near my house have a flat rate no matter how empty the tank is.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2011, 03:40:26 PM »

I've never heard of charging a flat rate to fill a propane tank. What will they come up with next? Shocked
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belfert
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« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2011, 04:07:35 PM »

I've never heard of charging a flat rate to fill a propane tank. What will they come up with next? Shocked

It is pretty rare where I live in the Minneapolis metro area to NOT charge a flat rate for filling 20 lb propane tanks.  All of the propane distributors I have visited charge flat rate.  The gas stations that have bulk tanks for filling also charge flat rate.  There is a little place that services gas grills that charges by the gallon so I usually fill there if I can't wait until my next trip to a Flying J.

My understanding is that U-Haul charges by the gallon, but I also hear they charge well over $4 a gallon.  Flying J is currently charging between about $2.99 and $3.29 a gallon for propane depending on location.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2011, 08:33:41 AM »

The price here in Central Oregon is running about $1.65/gal to 1.79/gal. Will
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