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Author Topic: Are Webasto/Espar/AquaHots Really Worth It?  (Read 4631 times)
lostagain
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« Reply #30 on: November 27, 2011, 07:28:24 PM »

Had the Webasto 2020 on the hockey team's D3 with S60. Factory installed because the S60 doesn't warm up untill it is worked hard, and will cool off fast if iddled for any lengh of time. There is a " Heater on " light on the dash that shows when it comes on by itself. Run it for 1/2 hour to an hour in the morning while having  breakfast, then the engine starts like on the 1st of July, with no smoke because it is  warm. Don't have to park near an electrical outlet behind the hotel while on the road.   I would come out and turn it on after the 2nd period so at the end of the game the bus was again nice and warm. If maintained properly, it isn't any more trouble than anything else.  

Best invention since buses were discovered, lol.

JC
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JC
Invermere, BC
1977 MC5C, 6V92/HT740
buswarrior
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'75 MC8 8V71 HT740




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« Reply #31 on: November 27, 2011, 08:46:25 PM »

The problems we hear on bus boards about failing equipment have far more to do with busnuts inheriting, or self inflicting, used up, worn out, preventive maintenance deprived boilers, than there being a problem with the boilers themselves.

It will be difficult for a busnut to wear out a new Webasto, or a Webasto that has been carefully refurbished, provided it is installed into a properly sized system, and a little maintenance is performed, mostly an annual cleaning, filter and nozzle.

My coach came from the previous owner with an oversized Webasto DBW 300, and being from the Great White North, I love that I can get the temp needle for the engine to climb towards the 160 degree limit in under 20 minutes when it is sub zero. Using bypass switches, the coach interior may be heated by the Webasto via the stock HVAC,the same as going down the road.
With this quick preheat, pretty much three 9 volt batteries in series will start the 8V71.
Now, to be fair, the DBW 300 will drink 4 litres/1.05 US gallon of diesel per hour, making that 104 000 BTU, so my example is not one to enter into the fuel economy discussions.

Would I consider including a fuel fired boiler in the design of another bus conversion?

Yes. (but a smaller one than this one!)

happy coaching!
buswarrior

 
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Frozen North, Greater Toronto Area
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« Reply #32 on: November 27, 2011, 09:05:54 PM »

  Has anyone ever calculated heat loss on a Bus with any real accuracy? At the least, many have 3 1/2 inch worth of fiberglass R value in the walls. Many have much better than that, 3 inches of foam could easily exceed R-20. The 40 footers are only 320 square feet, it shouldn't take 100K btu's per hour to stay warm. The fact many of you claim two 1500 watt heaters are usually more than enough would suggest less than 10K BTU heat loss at whatever temperature those can maintain comfort at. IOW, two 5000 BTU heaters running continuously to maintain 70*F would suggest 10K BTU heat loss at that outside temperature.

  Our Bounder is 32 feet long. The cab area firewall, cab walls and entire floor all the way back is uninsulated plywood. It has a 20K output Suburban and has never had any trouble keeping it warm almost down to 10*F on the highway (the cab heater is a joke), and much colder when parked. Except those time when it didn't work at all. In any case, I have never seen it run continuously, which would suggest 20K BTU would be more than sufficient if it were better insulated.
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buswarrior
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« Reply #33 on: November 27, 2011, 09:32:15 PM »

Search the archives, some winter not so long ago, I did an overnight experiment, to remove the solar variable, with a stock coach using a few electric heaters with the ambient temps down near 0 degrees Fahrenheit.

No, you don't need 100 000 BTU, unless you want to keep sucking outside ambient air in with the stock HVAC...

I don't remember if anyone contributed any rough calculations to my less than scientific observations.

I sure miss the smart folks who haunted the boards a decade ago, they did that stuff in their heads, or had work experience in the field.

The archives on BNO go back further.

happy coaching!
buswarrior

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Frozen North, Greater Toronto Area
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