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Author Topic: extra on board air compressor?  (Read 2606 times)
BRUISER
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« on: November 29, 2011, 06:24:10 AM »

I have a small air compressor that i have no need for in my garage and I was thinking I could install it in back of bus. not sure on size of compressor but it looks like this one


My thought was I could use this to help air up bus, air up kids toys, unlock bay doors, etc... without having to start up bus..

what size compressor does it take to air up this buses? will a small one work or will it take forever to air it up.. I know I can just go out there this weekend and try it but figured someone have have some experience on here..

thanks
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iMPAKS.com
Raleigh, NC
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Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2011, 06:32:30 AM »

What's the rating on this compressor?  What is max pressure that the governor allows and what's the Cu feet/ minute?  I'm going to guess that one this size would take a good bit of time to air up a bus system but that's only a guess.
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
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Jriddle
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« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2011, 06:34:55 AM »

I carry one also. It takes a while to air up but better than running the bus smoking out everyone in the camp ground. This topic is like oil and antifreeze LOL.


John
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If It Can't Be Grown Then It Has To Be Mined
John Riddle
Wells NV
1984 MC9
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« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2011, 06:41:36 AM »

I have that compressor. It takes about ten minutes to sit up the 4104
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Scott
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bevans6
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« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2011, 07:08:52 AM »

I have a 5 cfm rated compressor and it takes about 15 minutes to bring my MC5 all the way up.  You have to set the max pressure lower than the cut-out pressure on the air governor, so you don't have it cycle and dump all your compressor air out the purge valve if you are adding air near the ping tank.  Which I recommend so the air goes through the air dryer.

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
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Joe Camper
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« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2011, 07:11:00 AM »

Aux air compressors and pneumatic accessories...one of my pet peeves.

If I were starting from scratch or adding one where it currently does not exist It would be a/c powered not d/c,  it would ABSOLUTLY have its own tank and I would isolate it from the chassis air with a valve of some sort so under normal opporation it would be closed. I would also run any and all of the pneumatic gadjets directly off that tank not the chassis. And then Id run it off inverter.

Most motorhomes have compressors without tanks that supposily "simply" keeps the bus air up but what ends up happening is when all the additions develop leaks, or the chassis too for that matter, it makes it more difficult to identify the source of the leaks. Also helps when camping the thing will not have the burdon of keeping a leaky chassis system up in order to provide the air you need for the house.

On a side note if you do have a compressor without its own tank that supplies air to one of the chassis tanks somewhere in that line there will be a 1-way check valve. That 1-way valve is notorious for leeking and you will not hear or see it because it will push back thru the air intake on your aux compressor.

I would be willing to bet if yours is like this and has any age it is leaking there. Remove the plumbing between the aux compressor and that 1way valve and spray the backside of the valve with soapy water. Sometimes that valve is very hard to identify some of them simlpy look like a inline brass coupler

« Last Edit: November 29, 2011, 07:31:16 AM by Joe Camper » Logged

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Iceni John
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« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2011, 07:56:17 AM »

I have one of those generic 120 VAC "2 HP" twin-tank direct-drive oil-type compressors that are available under a variety of names from different vendors.   It's connected to the bus's accessories tank that is isolated from the rest of the bus air system by a PR-3 valve  -  this way it will not affect the brakes' air supply.   In an emergency I can also connect it directly to the wet tank and air up the entire bus in less than ten minutes.   I chose the twin-tank style of compressor because it's lower than most others and it fits neatly in the luggage bay under the frame rails.   I also put three air outlets around the bus, good for inflating tyres and using air tools.   So far so good.

John     
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1990 Crown 2R-40N-552:  6V92TAC, DDEC II, HT740, Jake.      Hecho en Chino.     
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« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2011, 08:14:25 AM »

  Two years ago I installed an axillary electric compressor. My Bluebird has a ton of air-operated accessories like the step, the generator slide draw, seats, vents, etc. The aux compressor also allows me to air the coach up prior to starting the CAT for an early morning departure from a campground.

   I purchased a small Makita unit and mounted the compressor in an available space in an open-to-the-air bay. I used a one way valve and a pressure protection valve so I could connect an air hose at the compressor if I wanted. The pressure protection valve is there to protect the coach air system in the event of a leak or failure of the aux compressor. The one way valve is needed because the pressure protection valve blocks air flow in both directions if the coach side drops below 75. Without it the aux compressor would not be able to fill an empty system. Originally I piped it to the wet tank, but it produced a lot of condensation so I re-routed it to the air dryer input.

  It has served me well.
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Gardner
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« Reply #8 on: November 29, 2011, 08:34:21 AM »

Moisture is one thing to think about if you bypass the air dryer going into the bus system.  If you connect directly to the aux system I might think about an external air dryer.  These little things can throw a ton of water if the weather is humid.

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
Vintage race cars -
1978 Lola T440 Formula Ford
1972 NTM MK-4 B/SR
belfert
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« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2011, 09:21:04 AM »

I hope these compressors you guys are using are quiet.  My father has a direct drive oil free compressor that could wake the dead.  Your neighbors would probably rather you start the engine than use a compressor like my dad has.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2011, 09:50:53 AM »

I had to put mine in what amounted to an insulated sound box, and it was still noisy, but OK.  I wish I could find a really quiet one that didn't cost three times what a normal one does.

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
Vintage race cars -
1978 Lola T440 Formula Ford
1972 NTM MK-4 B/SR
robertglines1
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« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2011, 10:14:54 AM »

set mine to kick in at 70lb and out at 90 lb.  runs about 4-5 minutes once a day. Find it no more noise than other peoples lp hot water heaters or furnaces. Is mounted in closed insulated bay/seems to get enough air. Keeps air door and leveling system working just great.We sit for up to two months at a time in winter(Florida) without starting bus. Put in in 1997.   Bob
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Iceni John
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« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2011, 11:01:34 AM »

I hope these compressors you guys are using are quiet.  My father has a direct drive oil free compressor that could wake the dead.  Your neighbors would probably rather you start the engine than use a compressor like my dad has.
Most oil-free compressors are noisier than most oil-lubricated ones.   Another thing to do is make a simple muffler / filter for the incoming air if it doesn't already have one  -  this can slightly quieten it.

John
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1990 Crown 2R-40N-552:  6V92TAC, DDEC II, HT740, Jake.      Hecho en Chino.     
Behind the Orange Curtain, SoCal.
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« Reply #13 on: November 29, 2011, 11:03:48 AM »

I have one of those generic 120 VAC "2 HP" twin-tank direct-drive oil-type compressors that are available under a variety of names from different vendors.   It's connected to the bus's accessories tank that is isolated from the rest of the bus air system by a PR-3 valve  -  this way it will not affect the brakes' air supply.   In an emergency I can also connect it directly to the wet tank and air up the entire bus in less than ten minutes.   I chose the twin-tank style of compressor because it's lower than most others and it fits neatly in the luggage bay under the frame rails.   I also put three air outlets around the bus, good for inflating tyres and using air tools.   So far so good.

John     
My words and thoughts exactly. I mounted mine beneath the driver's compartment since I don't carry a spare. Will
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Bill 340
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« Reply #14 on: November 29, 2011, 01:24:07 PM »

Don't know if it is supposed to or not, BUT  It worked for us. We were 15 mi from home and we sprung a air leak in a major air line, my bus compressor could not quite keep up so I plugged this same compressor you have into our aux connection, and it gave me enough extra air to get home and then to the garage the next day, Also blow up golf cart tires and bicycle tires for other folks at campground, kinda takes some of the fear away for them, they get to see we are really human.( Bus people that is), you have to decide, some say it wont work some of us just don't care if it's supposed to, try it then decide, I f we all liked or did everything the same as each other, Life would be boring...........................
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Bill & Brenda Phelan
Lakeland florida..........Host of the ARCADIA RALLY
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