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Author Topic: air lines for my bus garage  (Read 3475 times)
luvrbus
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« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2011, 02:37:40 PM »

If you read the on fitting it will be a DS number and PVC1 sch 40 is the thickness that is all those fittings are junk at HD and Lowes they are not rated as much as the pipe

good luck
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gus
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« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2011, 03:05:00 PM »

My guess is the quality control for PVC is not that strict since it is produced in such large quantities, so an occasional weak bad spot can sneak through. Much less likely to happen with metal of softer plastic.

Also, some water could freeze in PVC and it sure doesn't take much ice to break it since it is so brittle.
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PD4107-152
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Busted Knuckle
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« Reply #17 on: December 05, 2011, 03:11:29 PM »

Well here I go again being a bad apple! In our 3 shops we were in in Union City 2 were plumbed for air in PVC before we rented them! The 3rd I plumbed myself and used PVC as well.
The shop we bought here in Huntingdon, TN was already plumbed when we moved in. Guess what it's plumbed in with?
So I know for a fact I've been using air systems plumbed with PVC for 12 yrs and ain't no tell'n how long any of the shops had been that way before I used them.

I see no problems with it as long as the pressure is kept @ 150 or so. (really why would any of us need more than 150psi anyway?)
Grin  BK  Grin
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
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« Reply #18 on: December 05, 2011, 03:38:03 PM »

I agree with Brian.  In '97 I built a new 10k sq ft bus shop and plumbed the air system with OSHA approved plastic pipe and fittings from Harrington Industrial Plastics, Portland.  Sailed right through the inspections and was real easy to work with.  Don't remember much about the pipe except it was green and I believe a type of ABS.  Check out www.harringtonplastics.com for all the industrial air piping and tubing stuff.  If I was not concerned about meeting regs and codes, or possible exposure down the road, I would use black iron pipe if it was cheaper. Just IMO.
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David Anderson
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« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2011, 03:58:04 PM »

Thanks for the replies.  I'm not afraid of PVC since I've had it below grade under my house slab for 16 years and I use it at my car wash business above grade for 26 years, so it does work and work well.  However, I fight the moisture problems.  It gunks up my solenoid valves at the car wash.  I've tried installing drip legs, etc. and it does help, but still annoying.

David
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neverlearn
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« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2011, 04:49:25 PM »

I am on year 5 of soldered copper in my garage with a constant 175 psi in it.  I mounted mine overhead, on a pitch, with low-point traps and drain valves.
After going through all the work of copper, I saw a city maintenance garage using flexible plastic (of some sort) lines with push-in fittings.  The lines and fittings looked like a larger version of that which came with my kenmore reverse osmosis under-sink water filter.  I bet it took them less time to run air in that entire maintenance facility than it took me to hook up my residential garage.
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busguy01
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« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2011, 05:17:36 PM »

Built my "toy barn in 2002. Poured a slab outside and put a shed up with compressor inside of it. Ran a 2" flex line to building. Installed 2" sched 80 PVC in floor to many/several places. Still working good with no moisture issues. Also all the noise is outside! Did NOT connect shed Slab to shop slab.
Just my way -- your mileage may vary
JimH
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fraser8
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« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2011, 07:17:37 PM »

I got a bunch of part rolls of PEX pipe from a local plumber who does hot water in floor heating. It works great for air and handles the pressure, I have two runs that are almost a 100'. PEX fittings and and squeeze rings fit tight. Works for me and it was almost free.
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Fraser Field
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JackConrad
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« Reply #23 on: December 06, 2011, 05:10:17 AM »

I plumbed our shop using schedule 80  PVC (rated for 300 PSI) about 15 years ago, no problems so far. Main line is overhead with several drops attached to the walls. Each drop has a moisture trap about 12" below the quick connect fitting. Also a moisture drain on the storage tank which started it's life as an air starter tank on a NJ Eagle.  My compressor kicks out at 130 PSI.  Jack
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« Reply #24 on: December 06, 2011, 11:16:07 AM »

Looks like moisture traps around the fitting ends are the way to go.  Thanks for the ideas.

David
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neverlearn
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« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2011, 07:25:27 AM »

Just saw this today.  It looks very similar to what I saw in use in that City maintenance facility:

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200367525_200367525?cm_mmc=Housefile-_-cm_cat=3DAY2FGC_121211-_-cm_pla=STANDARD-_-P20

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Anything worth doing, is worth OVERdoing.
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kaptar
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« Reply #26 on: December 12, 2011, 10:28:11 AM »

Stay with the line rated for air. Schedule 80 pvc can hold the pressure but if it ever does blow due to impact of weak fitting it will throw shrapnel like a grenade. Be safe and follow the codes to protect yourself.
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junkman42
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« Reply #27 on: December 14, 2011, 06:20:59 AM »




there is a pvc material that is grey in color I do not remember the designation but is normally used with threaded fittings it is impervious to oil and does not degrade from most chemicals.  I used flex dot tubing like many of our buses use and I can tell You that the mice eat it faster in my shop than in the coach!  I also found that squirrels eat it also.  I plumbed air out to My pole barn and noticed the compressor running one day and discovered the lines or drops on the supports had been eaten!  Maybe I need a life time supply of dryer sheets!  Just My take.  John L
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RJ
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« Reply #28 on: December 14, 2011, 08:15:09 AM »

. . .there is a pvc material that is grey in color. . .

John -

The grey stuff I use is called CPVC, and is Schedule 80 rated.

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink
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RJ Long
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« Reply #29 on: December 14, 2011, 08:21:12 AM »

Our shop is 15k sq. ft. When we built it we ran air and power under the slab. As far as I know EVERY ONE of those have either been broken off at the floor, dragged, or bent flat by forklifts or what ever device of mass destruction the guys choose. I have everything overhead now.
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