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Author Topic: Furnace idea...  (Read 590 times)
travelingfools
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« on: December 06, 2011, 07:57:02 AM »

I just purchased a brand new propane 60,000 btu furnace for my camp for $460. It's footprint is 36 x 18 and has zero clearance on all sides. I don't remember the exact height but its around 30 inches and vents through a 4 inch pipe. It can be mounted in any direction be switching the direction of the exhaust blower. Can anyone think of any reason I would not want to put a 40,000 btu version of this in my bus ? Ive done all the measurements and it will fit in a bay with room for a plenum. The only downside I see is the 110 blower motor but me genset would handle it nicely and it would be used 90 percent of the time while parked with shore power. Comments / concerns ?
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John P, Lewiston NY   1987 MC 9 ...ex NJT
Lin
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« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2011, 08:06:55 AM »

I think you bring up your own reservations.  Even if you have shore power 90% of the time, you will need alternative heat for that other 10%.  Further, you will find yourself making camping decisions based on your heating needs.  Of course, you could run that heater through an inverter.  Anyway, why would you consider this unit better than an RV unit of equal output?
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bevans6
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« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2011, 08:10:04 AM »

It would probably work fine.  Issues are vibration resistance, servicability.  Probably the main difference to an RV furnace is the motor.  If you analyze your install and runs, you may be able to downsize the motor power and save electricity when running on the inverter.  Duct work is key to how these things work out - cold air return and hot air output both critical.

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
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TomC
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« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2011, 08:27:58 AM »

How much is the 40,000btu version?  I bought through J.C.Whitney a 40,000btu Atwood propane furnace for less then $600.00.  The advantage-very compact (measures 16.5" wide x 9.125" tall x 23.5" deep), made for the vibrations of mobile travel, runs on 12vdc, can get replacement parts or whole new unit just about anywhere RV parts are sold.  Disadvantage-a bit on the noisy side. Suburban makes a 40,000btu version with a very small (2x6) exterior vent remote mounted (up to 3ft) of the furnace (about the same size as the Atwood).  Personally-would NEVER install a household furnace in a bus-just because of the vibration and movement not designed into the unit.  But-you'll do it your way. Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
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