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Author Topic: How are you Leveling your Bus when parked?  (Read 3586 times)
Mex-Busnut
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« Reply #30 on: January 28, 2012, 07:11:01 AM »

If you top off at the 1/2 way point your only making a 400 some pound change, about the same as a couple fatties getting in/out. I would be surprised to see much movement in ride height.

Hey  I resemble that comment!
 Grin

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Dr. Steve, San Juan del Río, Querétaro, Mexico, North America, Planet Earth, Milky Way.
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Sean
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« Reply #31 on: January 28, 2012, 08:20:13 AM »

Sean- I was wondering how you determine the neutral position on your actuators.  I

I bought actuators with position feedback, specifically a high-turns potentiometer.  The wiper position of the pot is directly related to the extended position of the actuator.

There are lots of ways to use that information to center the actuators, for example, you could just put an ohmeter on it and note the reading at the desired center location.  What I chose to do instead, because it saved a few bucks and made for a simpler-to-use system, was to build a circuit using two voltage comparators, two trimmer pots, and two LEDs per actuator.  I know the actuator is centered when both LEDs are lit; when only one is lit, it tells me if that actuator is higher or lower than center.  I can tell at a glance the status of all three actuators.



Photo of level control (sorry, it needs a cleaning, and stainless is hard to photograph) showing both front actuators "high" and rear actuator "centered."

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I imagine that the road ride height length is about the middle of the actuator travel, which gives you room to both inflate and deflate the air bags.

Yes, we deliberately installed the actuators in such a way that the middle of their travel would be approximately the factory-spec ride height, so we had adjustment available in both directions.  This system also lets me set a higher ride height for humps and swales (we have lousy angles of approach and departure) or a lower one to get under bridges with 13'0" clearance.

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
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Lin
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« Reply #32 on: January 28, 2012, 09:21:07 AM »

Sean,

That certainly is a cool looking system.  I have been thinking of doing Bob's cable system because of its relative simplicity, but haven't done anything yet.  I would guess that the centering method you use would seem less complex if I even knew what the parts were.  Thanks.
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bobofthenorth
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« Reply #33 on: January 28, 2012, 09:36:31 AM »

While I dream about having Sean's system I know I'm not smart enough to build it so we carry landing pads in varying heights.  Its surprising how rarely we need to deploy them.  They serve double duty as an entry step, as a base for the hydraulic jack and occasionally as stepping stones to get across the river at Quartzsite.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #34 on: January 28, 2012, 11:59:46 AM »

Was never a problem with us when we owned a MCI just sleep with the head up and the feet down
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Lin
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« Reply #35 on: January 28, 2012, 01:08:19 PM »

I guess you are not a bat then.
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Aussiecoach
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« Reply #36 on: January 29, 2012, 02:23:41 PM »

Hi Sean

Would you happen to have any details or pics of you actuators you have or could post and a link to the ones you have?

Thanx
glen
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mikelutestanski
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« Reply #37 on: January 29, 2012, 03:43:14 PM »

Hello.  Pete from daytona used to sell kits, but he sold his bus and may not have any more parts.    Pete Pappas.   I have one of his systems.  Works well,
Look it up should be lots of info in the old posts about that subject.

   regards.  Mike
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Mike Lutestanski   Dunnellon Florida
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Sean
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« Reply #38 on: January 29, 2012, 08:34:47 PM »

... Would you happen to have any details or pics of you actuators you have or could post and a link to the ones you have?

I used Electrak-1 actuators, because I found a bunch of lightly-used ones on eBay at a good price.  New units of this type are spendy, so you want to shop around.

Here's a photo of the installation:



The wheel is removed in this photo, but you can clearly see the actuator and how it fits in with the ride-height valve.  We had to modify the arm on the height valve because the actuator was a good deal longer than the fixed adjusting rod.

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
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Aussiecoach
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« Reply #39 on: February 01, 2012, 02:15:56 AM »

Thanx Sean
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« Reply #40 on: February 01, 2012, 07:00:43 AM »

 
  As we can all clearly see, there are many ways to skin a cat. You dont have to be an electrical engineer or have $$$ falling out of your pockets to build a "system". You can go from a simple and inexpensive mechanical setup, up to something sophisticated, to possibly even something more complex and expensive, its all up to you, your ability, needs, knowledge, wants, desires. We can be sure someone out there could even figure out how to computerize the darn thing. Keep the levelers, or throw them away, its all up to you. There is no "right" way.

  The thing is, is that with an air suspension system, we have at our disposal a built in leveling system that can work beautifully, and it affords us a plethora of ways to accomplish our goals. Just watch your ride height and youll be okay.
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mikke60
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« Reply #41 on: February 01, 2012, 12:59:02 PM »

hi, I think i am going with sean's setup. my question is,how many pounds pressure does the actuator need to have,and how many inches of throw?  Thanks, Mike
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Sean
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« Reply #42 on: February 01, 2012, 02:00:34 PM »

hi, I think i am going with sean's setup. my question is,how many pounds pressure does the actuator need to have,and how many inches of throw?  Thanks, Mike

Mike, I also got your PM on this.

I think you will find the answers to your questions in my post on this topic from 2008:
http://www.busconversions.com/bbs/index.php?topic=7632.msg74868#msg74868

I would suggest, actually, to everyone reading this thread that they go back and read that one, too, as we covered a lot of good ground there.

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
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robertglines1
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« Reply #43 on: February 01, 2012, 02:54:06 PM »

How ever you do it you are lieing to the leveling valve anchor point. It's that simple and you increase or decrease the air pressure in that air bag/bags.  You can even eleminate the levelers and use pressure guages to do that.  Do what you understand and are comfortable with. If your air system leaks down you will need a electric back up air compressor-I have one that runs 2 to 3 minutes a day to maintain above 65 lb air pressure required to bypass brake protection valve. I have it set to kick off at 90. It also keeps my air door tight.   Enjoy.    Bob
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