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Author Topic: Can I use this foam for insulation  (Read 872 times)
topfrog007
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« on: February 12, 2012, 08:24:50 AM »

Hi Guys,

Saw somebody trying to get rid of a bunch of this stuff. He claims you can use it as insulation. It is like Hard StyroFoam board

Would save me a bunch of money if it would work.

Let me know what you think,

Thanks!
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Preston - Dothan Alabama - 1986 MCI 102A3
TomC
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« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2012, 08:32:37 AM »

Yes you can-but have the risk of rubbing and squeaking.  Cut for a tight fit, then fill in cracks with spray foam. 

On my bus, I installed 1x2 fir strips longitudinally over the frame (screwed in).  This allows for attaching both the furniture (can use hardwood for better strength in these spots), allows the insulation to be sprayed over the metal frame making for no exposed metal inside, and for 2.25" of insulation.  They make self spray kits-but this is one job I'd highly suggest you get done professionally-it is REALLY messy.  Granted it is around $2,000.00, but will be one of the most worth while investments having a freezer quality insulation in the years to come.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
johns4104
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« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2012, 09:31:52 AM »

I agree with Tom,
I bought the do it yourself kits had over $1500.00 in material and had to do it myself, messy is all i can say!

YMMV John
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PD4104-1859
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Jeremy
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« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2012, 11:17:56 AM »

Spraying foam into an empty shell is no doubt the ideal scenario, but not really feasible for people such as myself doing a conversion in stages. Different parts of my bus will always be at different stages of advancement because my bus is outside, so I have to (for instance) complete one slide-out before starting on the next one.

I do think that insulating with foam blocks or sheet can be entirely satisfactory though; I would suggest doing the opposite of what Tom said and deliberately leaving big gaps (1" or more) around the sides of (and possibly above) each block, into which aerosol foam can be injected. The aerosol foam expands like crazy, especially in a damp atmosphere, and a single can will bond in a lot of foam blocks. Once it's expanded and cured you'll be left with a completely homogenous layer of foam which can be trimmed back to the required depth just as you would with spray foam - but you can do just a few square feet at a time if you wish, not the whole bus.

Jeremy
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fraser8
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« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2012, 01:30:21 PM »

You can use the foam panels, but I would use some foam or other adhesive to keep the panels from moving. I worked out of an older van style ambulance for a couple of years that was insulated with panel insulation and one was loose, the squeak could drive you crazy enough to buy a bus in later years. 
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Fraser Field
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FloridaCliff
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« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2012, 02:03:28 PM »

When I put my foam board in(standard 4X8 builders panels 3/4 thick X 2), I put some construction adhesive on each piece to hold in place and then foamed all gaps, joints as others said.

No squeaks!

Good luck on your project,

Cliff
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gus
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« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2012, 06:39:13 PM »

My 4104 is insulated with piles of blue building foam and it works great. The engine makes so much noise I couldn't hear it if it squeaked anyway!!

My only concern is in case of fire it will make one heck of a smoke scene. Of course there is so much rubber and oily stuff it might not make much of a difference!
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PD4107-152
PD4104-1274
Ash Flat, AR
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