Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
September 21, 2014, 05:13:01 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an E-Mag Subscription: By clicking on any ad, a hotlink takes you directly to the advertiser’s website.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How often should wheel bearings be repacked or checked?  (Read 3683 times)
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5440




Ignore
« on: March 25, 2012, 10:14:32 AM »

How often should wheel bearings be repacked or checked?  I have grease on the tag and steering axles.  I had all of the bearings replaced when I first got the bus, but that was six years ago and perhaps 28,000 miles ago.  The manager of the bus garage said I was lucky I hadn't lost a wheel due to bearing failure.  He showed me a bearing they had removed that fell apart when it was removed.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
wg4t50
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 790





Ignore
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2012, 10:41:29 AM »

Timkin Bearing will tell you, using new bearing, proper preload adjustment, running in synthetic oil will not need attention for 500K miles.  That said, most folks no longer pack wheel bearings with grease.
Everyone does what the know and understand.
I recommend going to Timkin bearing webpage for current info on this subject.
Seems there are at least 15 versions of proper bearing adjustment, depending on who you ask. I find it best to learn from the folks that know.
Cheers
Dave

Google  timpin.com and dig into from there.

« Last Edit: March 25, 2012, 11:08:33 AM by wg4t50 » Logged

MCI7 20+ Yrs
Foretravel w/ISM500
WG4T CW for over 50 wpm for ever.
Central Virginia
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5440




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2012, 11:10:09 AM »

For some reason my bus had grease for tag and steer axles when I got it.  I saw no reason to spend the money to convert to oil.  The only other running Dina bus I have seen up close has oil bearings.  I don't know if my bus came originally came with grease or oil.

Is the lifespan reduced with grease versus oil?  I believe the mileage on my bus is around 400,000 miles so the first set of bearings was completely shot in under 500,000 miles.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
wg4t50
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 790





Ignore
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2012, 11:17:23 AM »

Yes, My MCI came with grease front and tag bearings, I changed to oil hubs and never had any issues in the 20+ years.
YOU need to  do what ever you feel comfy with, either way its yours.
Me, I want the max longevity and least problems, but that is just me.
Everyone will tell you something different, so find someone that likes your method and smile.
Dave
Logged

MCI7 20+ Yrs
Foretravel w/ISM500
WG4T CW for over 50 wpm for ever.
Central Virginia
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5440




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2012, 12:51:43 PM »

Isn't one of the issues with oil that the upper part of the bearing isn't bathed in oil when the bus is parked?  My bus generally stays parked from November through April or so.  It has been a really mild winter so I did have it out in February this year for a short run.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12504




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2012, 01:29:11 PM »

Oil or grease Timken doesn't care use a soap base grease for wheel bearing but oil will carry the contaminates away from the needles better that grease IMO then the down side to oil are the leaks a good wheel bearing pack should last a 100,000 miles using the right grease.

The story about the upper part of the bearing is a myth the bearing stays coated if not you would have the same problem with all bearings transmission,differential on the bus including your engine    

good luck
« Last Edit: March 25, 2012, 06:47:28 PM by luvrbus » Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
Seayfam
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 453





Ignore
« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2012, 01:32:00 PM »

Isn't one of the issues with oil that the upper part of the bearing isn't bathed in oil when the bus is parked?  My bus generally stays parked from November through April or so.  It has been a really mild winter so I did have it out in February this year for a short run.

Not to argue this point, but I have never been able to understand why so many people are worried about that. The way I look at it is...the upper half of your drive axle bearings are not sitting in oil when parked nor is many other parts of the drive train that are lubed with oil. Personally, I prefer the oiled bearings, gives me peace of mind out on the highway knowing all I have to do is look and see if it is full.

Sent from my GT-I9100 using Xparent Green Tapatalk
Logged

Gary Seay (location Alaska)
1969 MCI MC-6 unit# 20006
8V92 turbo 740 auto
more pics and information here     "  www.my69mci-6.blogspot.com  "
Seayfam
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 453





Ignore
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2012, 01:40:03 PM »

Sorry about that Clifford, I must have been typing while you were posting. Smiley
Tapatalk won't tell me if someone just posted.

Sent from my GT-I9100 using Xparent Green Tapatalk
Logged

Gary Seay (location Alaska)
1969 MCI MC-6 unit# 20006
8V92 turbo 740 auto
more pics and information here     "  www.my69mci-6.blogspot.com  "
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5440




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2012, 01:44:59 PM »

I've still got a ways to go then if grease only needs repacking every 100,000 miles.  I won't wait that long because I would be at 15 years or more to hit 100,000 miles.  I know that the bearings on my trailer like get water in them over time, but the bus bearings I'm sure are better sealed.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
bevans6
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4640


1980 MCI MC-5C




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2012, 02:14:17 PM »

You can check the adjustment easy enough any time the wheel is off the ground - just give it a push-pull to feel for looseness.

Brian
Logged

1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
Vintage race cars -
1978 Lola T440 Formula Ford
1972 NTM MK-4 B/SR
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5440




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2012, 02:45:22 PM »

Unfortunately, I don't have a jack big enough to lift the bus.  I take the bus to C&J Bus Repair every year for oil change, lube, and inspection.  They place the bus on a lift so I could have them check for loose bearings easily enough.  Every time I think about getting a jack big enough for the bus I decide it isn't worth spending the money.  I did just buy a torque wrench so I can check the lug nuts before trips.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Mex-Busnut
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1135





Ignore
« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2012, 06:29:58 PM »

A good thread!

I once had a wheel bearing on a truck fail and weld itself to the hub. That was expensive! So I would highly recommend anybody acquiring a second-hand bus make this a priority. Disassemble all four corners, and check brakes, clean and repack wheel bearings, and KNOW FIRST HAND what you are starting with.

In our case, the PO said our bus had great brakes. Our diesel mechanic discovered the rear brakes were plenty thick, and yet "crystallized", whatever that means. The front ones were in great shape.

So while the mechanic was at it, he pulled out all wheel bearings, and thoroughly cleaned them. Two required replacement. All were then packed with good-quality grease. 

It is usually cheaper and less thrilling to do preventive maintenance in a shop, than in the middle of nowhere on a lonely highway in the middle of the night.
Logged

Dr. Steve, San Juan del Río, Querétaro, Mexico, North America, Planet Earth, Milky Way.
1981 Dina Olímpico (Flxible Flxliner clone), 6V92TA Detroit Diesel
Rockwell model RM135A 9-speed manual tranny.
Jake brakes
100 miles North West of Mexico City, Mexico. 6,800 feet altitude.
RnMAdventures
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 408





Ignore
« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2012, 06:53:35 PM »

It is usually cheaper and less thrilling to do preventive maintenance in a shop, than in the middle of nowhere on a lonely highway in the middle of the night.

Where's your sense of adventure? Huh

Good post Doc, I agree. I have done the "middle of the night in the middle of now where" thing. Now having had that fun, I try to avoid that fun now.
Logged

Mike & Rosemarie
1964 PD4106-2626
DD8v71 & Allison v730
Oonrahnjay
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1425





Ignore
« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2012, 08:40:49 PM »

(snip)  in the middle of nowhere on a lonely highway in the middle of the night.

    You forgot about the "pouring rain" part.
Logged

Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
Mex-Busnut
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1135





Ignore
« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2012, 09:13:07 PM »

Good comments, everybody!

 Grin

By the way, while you are at it, when was the last time the oil in the bus's rear end (differential) was changed? In our case, the oil was milky white, so contaminated with water. And the transmission oil?

When I get any used vehicle, I like to start with:

    1. Wash everything carefully, including engine and under body.
    2. Change all oils and check for leaks.
    3. Change all hoses and belts.
    4. Get the radiator thoroughly checked out. (Ours was rotten!)
    5. Carefully check out all brakes.
    6. Check out alternator, starter and batteries.

Keep a log (diary) of what you do or have done, with date, mileage and exactly what was done.

Most problems on the road can be avoided this way.
Logged

Dr. Steve, San Juan del Río, Querétaro, Mexico, North America, Planet Earth, Milky Way.
1981 Dina Olímpico (Flxible Flxliner clone), 6V92TA Detroit Diesel
Rockwell model RM135A 9-speed manual tranny.
Jake brakes
100 miles North West of Mexico City, Mexico. 6,800 feet altitude.
buswarrior
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3571


'75 MC8 8V71 HT740




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2012, 12:49:54 PM »

The other problem that a low mileage busnut will run into referring to the commercial duty cycle...

the axle seals.

Nobody in the real world can predict how age will come into play on our low mileage and long sitting situations.

And, you want to inspect and do maintenance on the brakes periodically. So a tear down of the wheel end for a variety of preventive maintenance reasons on some cycle would be good, and be earlier than some of the bits and pieces could go.

Also, for those who park the coach for months over the winter season, have some way to block the parking brakes so that the shoes don't rust to the linings. Or, air it up and move it a half wheel turn periodically through the off season.

happy coaching!
buswarrior
Logged

Frozen North, Greater Toronto Area
Busted Knuckle
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6447


6 Setras, 2 MCIs, and 1 Dina. Just buses ;D


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2012, 12:58:14 PM »

Brian trust me on this I can assure you your bus had AT LEAST a million & 400,000 on it when you bought it!

Trust me on this, I know commercial vehicles and can garuntee it had way over 400,000 when you bought it.
Grin  BK  Grin


That is unless it sat on Bobby's lot 5 or 6 yrs before he sold it to you!
Logged

Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
Zeroclearance
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 523





Ignore
« Reply #17 on: March 27, 2012, 01:27:47 PM »

If it has 1.4 million on it, he should get the repair history on the bearings or "just" replace them.
Logged
Busted Knuckle
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6447


6 Setras, 2 MCIs, and 1 Dina. Just buses ;D


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #18 on: March 27, 2012, 01:55:07 PM »

If it has 1.4 million on it, he should get the repair history on the bearings or "just" replace them.

He bought it from Bobby Easter of Easter's Bus Sales ..................

Need I say more? I can assure you there are/were no records. But he knows the history of them since he had C&J do all that when he brought it home.
Grin  BK  Grin
Logged

Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
Zeroclearance
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 523





Ignore
« Reply #19 on: March 27, 2012, 02:38:33 PM »

Hopefully his Series 60 been inframe'd.   I would be checking the bullnose assy for backlash.  Brian checked mine this past summer at 240K,  when I installed a aux drive gear and updated my Jakes, new updated turbocharger, and radiator.
Logged
dolson
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 86



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #20 on: March 27, 2012, 02:51:11 PM »

I do not want to get this thread off topic but this seams somewhat relevent.  I have replaced all of my wheel bearings about 4K miles ago.  My front drivers side has started making a clicking sound more noticeable at low speed.  Not sure this is the bearing, but its not a rock in my tire.  Could this indicate too loose or too tight of a adjustment? Does not do it when it is off the ground and adjustment feels good.
Logged

Doug Olson
Langley, OK
1992 MCI 102C3, 6V92, HT740
http://www.dwolson.com
Busted Knuckle
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6447


6 Setras, 2 MCIs, and 1 Dina. Just buses ;D


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #21 on: March 27, 2012, 03:10:04 PM »

It could mean that Doug. Or it may just be an improperly torqued aluminum wheel!
Grin  BK  Grin
Logged

Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
buswarrior
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3571


'75 MC8 8V71 HT740




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: March 27, 2012, 03:13:07 PM »

The bearing people have fairly exacting standards for bearing installation.

Another one of these things where many in industry keep using and promoting antiquated methods.

Here's a two page industry best practices technical guide from Stemco. The first page is general bearings, the second page is for their Pro-Torq brand.

These were arrived at by the Technical and Maintenance Council of the American Trucking Associations.

http://www.todaystrucking.com/images/740-wheel_bearing_adjustment.pdf

http://www.trucking.org/Federation/Councils/TMC/Pages/default.aspx

happy coaching!
buswarrior
 

Logged

Frozen North, Greater Toronto Area
Ed Hackenbruch
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2403




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: March 27, 2012, 06:01:32 PM »

 Like BK says, check your lug nuts. Sounds like one or more is loose to me. Grin
Logged

1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5440




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: March 27, 2012, 06:05:11 PM »

That is unless it sat on Bobby's lot 5 or 6 yrs before he sold it to you!

Bobby actually had the bus on his lot for at least three years.  The title to the bus was in the name of Easter bus sales.  The title had been issued to Easter's three years before they handed the title to me.  I suspect the bus had been repossessed based on the condition of brakes and such, plus it appears the operator had gone out of business before I got the bus.  The bus issn't in nearly as bad of condition as some other Dinas I've seen up close with lots of miles which leads me to my mileage estimate which could be way off.

I have no service records from before I got the bus, but I had all of the bearings replaced when I got the bus home.  I changed the transmission fluid/filters and coolant for the second time this past summer.  The rear differential fluid has been replaced at least once since I've had the bus.  Brake shoes and drums were replaced when I first bought the bus.

I really have no idea how often greased bearings should be repacked when in RV service instead of commercial service, but I suspect 100,000 miles is way too long when it will take me over 10 years to accumulate 100,000 miles.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6785





Ignore
« Reply #25 on: March 30, 2012, 08:55:41 AM »

Virtually all trucks have oil bearings on the front axle.  Most trailers do also, although there are permalube grease bearings available for semi trailers now.  The first thing I had done to my bus when I bought it-before bringing it home from Portland, Or was to have the front axle bearings changed to oil.  In over 35,000miles and 18 years, have never had a leak-the bus is parked indoors also.
If I still had greased bearings, I would pull the wheels and repack every year before your big trip of the year.  I personally don't like greased bearings-and neither do the truck manufacturers.  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
edroelle
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 351


1998 Royale Prevost




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: March 30, 2012, 03:36:05 PM »

I have changed many bearings.  Being a bearing engineer for a number of years, and understanding the reliability of various sources, I always select Timken bearings.   (Although their quality may have changed, that is the best information I have.)

I have gradually changed from oil filled to grease on my bearings.   Our coaches have relatively little use.   Thus, I have gone by Luke's recommendation and rationale.  Seals age and spindles may have some wear.   The grease is more forgiving.     Just my 2 cents.

Ed Roelle
Flint, MI
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!