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Author Topic: Roof paint.  (Read 1208 times)
Dave5Cs
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1979 MCI MC5Cs 6V-71 HT-740 Allison, Roseville, CA




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« Reply #15 on: October 02, 2014, 07:11:38 AM »

eagle,  when it gets old it does get powdery and white may just be the over coat of whatever the sun over time does to the ZC, But yes it is a weird light green color when it goes on. Can't get it here either in Cali anymore but there are a lot of paints you can't get here anymore. I am surprised paint doesn't just fall off cars here because of all the things they have taken out of it here. LOL Grin
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Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2014, 07:56:28 AM »

  eagle,  when it gets old it does get powdery and white may just be the over coat of whatever the sun over time does to the ZC, But yes it is a weird light green color when it goes on. Can't get it here either in Cali anymore but there are a lot of paints you can't get here anymore. I am surprised paint doesn't just fall off cars here because of all the things they have taken out of it here. LOL Grin

      Dave, I don't know if zinc-chromate was developed for aluminum airplanes in the 1930's-40's, but if not, it was sure adopted widely by then (and continues to be used).  I don't know if it's still "the gold standard", but it was surely the best thing available for many decades.  And, yeah, the color is about the weirdest you'll ever see.
      And you don't need paint in California!  You just move your painting stuff offshore to another place in the world and let them put the volatile stuff in the atmosphere.  The fact that the industry, economy, jobs and money in circulation also go offshore -- that's OK, some environmental group said it would be a good thing so ARB and the politicians are all over it!
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
yvan
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« Reply #17 on: October 02, 2014, 08:22:44 AM »

What about EDPM sheets VS paint, advantages one over the other?
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Yvan Lacroix, Father of 3, grand father of 8, detailer of anything, and GMC 5302 driver, Granby Quebec.

Feel free to follow along the renovation here http://s144.photobucket.com/user/repare-brise/library/bus
sparkplug188
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1979 Model 5 Eagle - 45/102 8v92 HT740




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« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2014, 06:00:00 AM »

Liquid EPDM is the way to go.  It needs to be mixed in batches and troweled on 3/16" thick.  It flows into every crevice and self levels as it cures.  It is so thick, you won't be able to see the rivets or layers of aluminum on the roof.  The higher upfront cost is justified when you consider its proven 15 to 20 year lifespan.  On my previous RVs, I have tried to save money by using the cheap hardware store coatings. They roll on like water and peel every 1 to 2 years.  It was just miserable having to scrape the loose coating and constantly redo the roof with the cheap stuff.

http://www.epdmcoatings.com/

yvan - EPDM sheets or Liquid EPDM will seal leaky rivets and seams.  Paint will not seal a leaky roof.  My bus roof was painted by the previous owner.  The paint around every rivet had a circular crack and every seam had a straight crack.  Paint is more resistant to UV damage than EPDM, but can't be trusted to seal anything.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2014, 06:22:10 AM by sparkplug188 » Logged
mung
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« Reply #19 on: October 05, 2014, 12:11:03 PM »

I wonder how Plastidip would work on a roof?
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Vern in Central Florida
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eagle19952
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« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2014, 12:12:04 PM »

I wonder how Plastidip would work on a roof?

seriously ?
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Donald PH
1978 Model 05 Eagle w/Torsilastic Suspension,8V71 NA, DDAllison on 24.5's 12kw Kubota.
Wants Paint Smiley
Previously owned by Wee Willie Ent.
mung
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« Reply #21 on: October 06, 2014, 05:38:38 AM »

Yes, seriously.  There are a HUGE group of people who are doing it to their cars.  Makes a nice coating that can be pulled off easily if you want to change it out.
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Vern in Central Florida
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sparkplug188
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« Reply #22 on: October 06, 2014, 08:31:38 AM »

Why bother?  You will need about 5 gallons of Plastidip to build up a layer thick enough to be waterproof and durable.  5 gallons of Plastidip costs about $300 and has to be sprayed on in many coats.  It could be a costly waste or it might work just fine.

It would be wiser to spend the $300 on a purpose made roof coating.  With only 350sq/ft to cover, $300 will get you the best that money can buy.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2014, 08:39:35 AM by sparkplug188 » Logged
mung
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« Reply #23 on: October 06, 2014, 08:39:28 AM »

It was just a thought because of being able to peel it off if need be.
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Vern in Central Florida
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yvan
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« Reply #24 on: October 06, 2014, 03:55:57 PM »

I plastidip cars in my business, and will more then likely end up doing the sides of James( not enough time to paint for now). I wouldn't even think of it for the roof though, application on horizontal surfaces is a real pain.
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Yvan Lacroix, Father of 3, grand father of 8, detailer of anything, and GMC 5302 driver, Granby Quebec.

Feel free to follow along the renovation here http://s144.photobucket.com/user/repare-brise/library/bus
krank
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« Reply #25 on: October 06, 2014, 07:32:00 PM »

I was thinking of having the same material they use for lining truck boxes applied to the roof. I don't think I would use the DIY kits but rather have it professionally done. I am thinking it may reduce heat transfer and it should substantially reduce the noise level. Thoughts on this?
Sorry for the thread jacking....
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Jim Eh.
1996 MC12
6V92TA / HT741D
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Winnipeg, MB.
yvan
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« Reply #26 on: October 06, 2014, 07:40:48 PM »

We apply SEM Protex in my shops, enough to do the roof of a bus would run around $1000. Again application would be an issue. as well as prep. Good idea, but best stick to conventional, proven products.
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Yvan Lacroix, Father of 3, grand father of 8, detailer of anything, and GMC 5302 driver, Granby Quebec.

Feel free to follow along the renovation here http://s144.photobucket.com/user/repare-brise/library/bus
MightyThor
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« Reply #27 on: October 06, 2014, 09:22:42 PM »

I was thinking of having the same material they use for lining truck boxes applied to the roof. I don't think I would use the DIY kits but rather have it professionally done. I am thinking it may reduce heat transfer and it should substantially reduce the noise level. Thoughts on this?
Sorry for the thread jacking....

The bed liner is an interesting option with pro's and Con's.  Pro would be the fact that the material is created to withstand weather and is pretty durable.  Preparation of the bus is important for good adhesion. Also, it is waterproof.  Con might be weight.  The stuff, when applied to speck is actually fairly heavy compared to some other materials.  Speck usually calls for 1/8 or more in thickness.  Colors may also be limited, but seems like there are more options recently.  also, the coating is not color fast and will fade with exposure and there really is no effective long term way to bring the color back.  Finally, if you put bed liner on, you will not get it off again without damage to the metal. 
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Dave5Cs
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1979 MCI MC5Cs 6V-71 HT-740 Allison, Roseville, CA




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« Reply #28 on: October 06, 2014, 09:27:56 PM »

Some of the problems with the roof is lay over panels and rivets as well as fans and AC units etc. to go around that will leave an edge. The roof for most of these rubberized coatings has to be really clean and de-greased, the powdery residue has to be stabilized. If these things are not done they will eventually get air under them and pieces will start to lift and when water gets in it will be a mess.

Bus Kote is not cheap but done right will give good results. Or painted with a good sealer and Automotive paint. House paint will peel might last a little while. Just some thoughts.
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