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Author Topic: First mini-split is installed  (Read 3551 times)
Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2012, 10:05:38 PM »

  (snip)  At one of the BCM rallys MAK held back in the 90's, one of the busnuts who sat at my table during dinner was commenting on how he had to open the bay doors while parked so his mini-split's outside units wouldn't overheat in the summer.  No problem on the road.

       There's got to be a spec for clearance, air flow, heat movement, etc. on these things.  If you're OK on the specs, they should work OK, right?
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
Mex-Busnut
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« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2012, 10:20:42 PM »

... he had to open the bay doors while parked so his mini-split's outside units wouldn't overheat in the summer.  No problem on the road.

I am no expert, but I wonder if he vented the units both on the bay door and the floor?
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Dr. Steve, San Juan del Río, Querétaro, Mexico, North America, Planet Earth, Milky Way.
1981 Dina Olímpico (Flxible Flxliner clone), 6V92TA Detroit Diesel
Rockwell model RM135A 9-speed manual tranny.
Jake brakes
100 miles North West of Mexico City, Mexico. 6,800 feet altitude.
eagle19952
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« Reply #17 on: May 29, 2012, 10:00:50 PM »

here is my outside unit, (240v) installed in my center bay,will make 64* in TX and SW FL.
since i have owned it I have replaced the squirrel fan blower motor and the compressor cap/run/start.
and the time delay on the air handler.
But thats the way i use my coach.

« Last Edit: May 29, 2012, 10:06:37 PM by eagle19952 » Logged
Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #18 on: May 30, 2012, 09:01:41 AM »

  here is my outside unit, (240v) installed in my center bay,will make 64* in TX and SW FL.   (snip)

    Nice install!  What's the size of the grille in the door?  And it looks like you exhaust into a plenum behind it that ducts out under the bus - is that correct?  What are the dimensions of that exhaust duct?  Thanks,  Bruce H,  NC  USA
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
eagle19952
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« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2012, 10:37:10 AM »

No...The AC unit was made in Dallas TX,the enclosure is as you see it with the only "opening"as you see it,(the back,sides,top,and bottom are all sheet metal), that which is behind it is my black tank and one fresh water tank,which at the time of the photo were clad with plywood fabriced with boat fiber carpet.<Thats what I call it.. Grin
The wooden exhaust "channeling device" is zero clearance when the bay door is closed to prevent hot air from escaping into the baggage bay.It fits very snug to the expanded metal.
There is an air intake grill of expanded metal,below the hinge exhaust above.
The safety triangle box gives a relational idea of the units size.
the intake air grill is (lower<below the split piece) is about 16x10 and the upper grill isabout 20x23< too large..perhaps but works well parked or moving.
the exhaust "containing/directing" diverter is made of 1x4 pine because sheet metal would wear and rattle...It is 9"by 4 1/2" inside dimension.
This is the best pic i have (online) showing the grills.

Now my gen set does exhaust the radiator fan out the bottom of the baggage bay. the hole in the floor is only about 8x16 but again the radiator is completely "shrouded" again to prevent excess radiator fan air from escaping into the bay/enclosure.
I have made 'improvements from the original design. It all works very well.For me>i have spent LOTS of summers in FL AZ and TX and no heat "damages" to my set-up has happened.
Having said that I do not use my gen every day,but I did in Death Valley.
PS I have a custom built gen exhaust sys that is capped with a stock muffler from a 2006 Harley Davidson FLH.it goes about 20 inches over the top of my coach...but I only use it if the neighbor sticks around.... Roll Eyes


 here is my outside unit, (240v) installed in my center bay,will make 64* in TX and SW FL.   (snip)


    Nice install!  What's the size of the grille in the door?  And it looks like you exhaust into a plenum behind it that ducts out under the bus - is that correct?  What are the dimensions of that exhaust duct?  Thanks,  Bruce H,  NC  USA
« Last Edit: May 30, 2012, 10:59:12 AM by eagle19952 » Logged
Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2012, 10:55:33 AM »

No...The AC unit was made in Dallas TX,the enclosure is as you see it with the only "opening"as you see it,(the back,sides,top,and bottom are all sheet metal), that which is behind it is my black tank and one fresh water tank,which at the time of the photo were clad with plywood fabriced wiith boat fiber carpet.
The wooden exhaust "channeling device" is zero clearance when the bay door is closed to prevent hot air from escaping into the baggage bay.It fits very snug to the expanded metal.
There is an air intake grill of expanded metal,below the hinge exhaust above.
The safety triangle box gives a relational idea of the units size.
the intake air grill is (lower<below the split piece) is about 16x10 and the upper grill isabout 20x23< too large..perhaps but works well parked or moving.
the exhaust "containing/directing" diverter is made of 1x4 pine because sheet metal would wear and rattle...It is 9"by 4 1/2" inside dimension.   

    Thank you for this info.  I see now how it works.  I'm glad to hear this -- it appears that you can pass enough air with a grill that's a good bit smaller than the actual matrix material of the coil -- and that's good news for those of us with limited install room.
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
eagle19952
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« Reply #21 on: May 30, 2012, 11:00:59 AM »

SEE EDITS ABOVE>>>> Roll Eyes Shocked Huh Shocked Smiley
PS, THE LAST BAY ,, rear.....has been completely re-designed, it has little resemblance to that picture. Grin
« Last Edit: May 30, 2012, 11:11:39 AM by eagle19952 » Logged
eagle19952
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« Reply #22 on: May 30, 2012, 11:26:50 AM »

in this photo you can see the door/closet that contains my AC/Heat air handler unit,similar to one that you might find in a mobile home or often used in a vertical space vs one that would be horizontally installed in an attic space....
The handler intake is at the floor and you can see two AC/heat outlets
there is also "duct work" integral to the kitchen cabinets....the slide out is a pantry.
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eagle19952
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« Reply #23 on: May 30, 2012, 11:45:09 AM »

and here are the remaining air outs...all are "ducted" thru the "furniture" so to speak...and no we did not use my "check booK" the interior remodel was part of a llease return "contract". I was just fortunate enuff to locate and purchase it .


PS sorry to have semi Hi jackt this thread, I would still like to see the mini splits.
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dukegrad98
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« Reply #24 on: May 30, 2012, 11:57:53 AM »

I'm still following!  And I'll still get some photos when I get a chance to get over and check out progress.  I think the second mini-split (unit in the driver area) is being installed today. 

The existing outdoor unit is in a vented basement bay, which I think I've said before.  Basically the outer skin of that bay door is slotted.  The last couple of days have been in the mid-90s, and the unit is working fine even with the bay door shut.  It does run a lot, but of course it is inadequate for a 40' bus.  It cycles properly at night (set to 68 degrees) when outdoor temps are down a little bit and it's not fighting the whole bus roof in the sun. 

I'll snap a picture or two next time I am there.  The available sizes and specs are all easy to find online.

Cheers, John
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Midwilshire
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« Reply #25 on: May 31, 2012, 12:48:41 PM »

Can anyone recommend a good 9k or 12k btu INVERTER, precharged mini-split?
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Michael & Gigi
1978 MCI-5C "Silverliner"
Tampa, FL
Midwilshire
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« Reply #26 on: May 31, 2012, 01:16:05 PM »

All the soleus units I have installed came precharged.

Evacuate --- check for leaks and open the valve.

Melbo

How does one evacuate these things?  What sort of tool is required?  And I assume soapy water will suffice for leak checking?
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Michael & Gigi
1978 MCI-5C "Silverliner"
Tampa, FL
dukegrad98
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« Reply #27 on: May 31, 2012, 01:47:00 PM »

How does one evacuate these things?  What sort of tool is required?  And I assume soapy water will suffice for leak checking?

Vacuum pump with a gauge to tell you when you've pulled a full vacuum.  One more reason I outsourced that part of my install and left it to the pros.  With two units in, I've got 30+ feet of copper line in the bus now.  One unit to go. 

Cheers, John
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Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #28 on: May 31, 2012, 02:37:37 PM »

  Vacuum pump with a gauge to tell you when you've pulled a full vacuum.  One more reason I outsourced that part of my install and left it to the pros.  (snip) 

     OK, it's obvious that they teach "good judgment" at the University of New Jersey at Durham!  That's careful, conservative planning, John -- and careful, conservative planning has prevented many a busnut's mishap.  You're correct that a sophisticated vacuum pump (with precision readouts) is needed.  There are two leak tests; 1) you pull the system down to absolute vacuum (OK, as reasonably close to absolute vacuum as you'll get outside a multi-million-dollar physics lab), stop the pump and let the system sit for a while (usually 20-30 minutes) - the vacuum readout must show NO increase,  2) pull a vacuum on the system and put in a small amount of the coolant (often called 'freon') and use a sensitive "sniffer" machine to check all connectors and any other possible sources of leaks.  Both of these require service machinery that's not practical for most of us to own, so another vote for a professional doing this part of the work.

(PS Midwil - The reason that you have to evacuate the system is that the chemical components of air (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and the "fractional percentage" chemicals) will interact over time with the coolant fluid and the lubrication oil that are in the system.  A more immediate contaminant is water vapor -- even in Arizona, there will be enough water in the air to gum up the works of an air conditioning system if it's not removed during the complete evacuation of the system.  There is a "receiver/dryer" in the system that filters the coolant fluid during use and removes water but it's made to cope with the tiny bit that may leak into a system - not the big slug of water that's left in a system that's not properly evacuated.   John is right - unless a bus owner has extensive training, experience, and the correct equipment, leak detection and evacuation is best left to pros.)
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
Midwilshire
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« Reply #29 on: June 01, 2012, 07:50:15 PM »

Thanks for the info.  Are you saying that those vacuum pumps from harbor freight wouldn't cut it? 
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Michael & Gigi
1978 MCI-5C "Silverliner"
Tampa, FL
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