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Author Topic: Converting MCI J4500  (Read 4581 times)
Boomer
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« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2012, 09:07:22 AM »

When you buy a new bus(s) you are not just buying the bus.  You are buying the support, service and parts availability, warranty and how it's honored, financing, and residual value in 5-10 years plus a host of other important items.   Prevost is head and shoulders above the rest in these areas.  Best mfg in the biz IMHO.
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'81 Eagle 15/45
'47 GM PD3751-438
'65 Crown Atomic
Vancouver, WA USA
PCC
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« Reply #16 on: May 25, 2012, 10:06:56 AM »

On one of my conversions, I was working with a shipright. his scribing lines, and perfect mating with wood could mean this will be a beyond awesome finish job.

I hope I get to see that workmanship some day.

Welcome singlebarrel

PCC
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For some, patience is a virtue.
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Kevinmc5
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« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2012, 04:25:19 PM »

Hope to see his work. singlebarrel will be capton of the black top Grin

Kevin
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Geoff
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« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2012, 05:46:46 PM »

I think I'll stick to my MUI 6V92TA @ 350HP in my '82 RTS.  I can fix anything that goes wrong with it and getting parts is not a problem.  I'm not a check-book converter.

--Geoff
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Geoff
'82 RTS AZ
Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #19 on: May 25, 2012, 05:50:31 PM »

I think I'll stick to my MUI 6V92TA @ 350HP in my '82 RTS.  I can fix anything that goes wrong with it and getting parts is not a problem.   (snip)

     Yeah, but it would be heaven to not have to deal with dirt, corrosion, and damage before I do *anything*.  But not in this lifetime.   I guess I could be a checkbook converter but the bus would probably end up as flat as my checkbook.  Not good ...
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
Geoff
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« Reply #20 on: May 26, 2012, 07:41:37 AM »

My bus is from California and had no corrosion, dirt?- yes.  But the frame and stainless steel looked almost new.  One thing (besides the electronics) I don't like about the newer buses is the non-opening windows.  You spend a fortune just getting started buying windows!


I think I'll stick to my MUI 6V92TA @ 350HP in my '82 RTS.  I can fix anything that goes wrong with it and getting parts is not a problem.   (snip)

     Yeah, but it would be heaven to not have to deal with dirt, corrosion, and damage before I do *anything*.  But not in this lifetime.   I guess I could be a checkbook converter but the bus would probably end up as flat as my checkbook.  Not good ...

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Geoff
'82 RTS AZ
belfert
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« Reply #21 on: May 26, 2012, 11:32:09 AM »

If one buys a new conversion shell they'll put in whatever windows you want.  Coach buses haven't had opening windows since what, the 70s?  You can still get brand new transit buses with opening windows although some are ordering them with frameless windows now.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
RJ
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« Reply #22 on: May 26, 2012, 03:50:44 PM »

My bus is from California and had no corrosion. . .

Geoff -

I'm having a senior moment right now. . . I seem to remember that your RTS is an ex-GGT coach?

 Huh
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RJ Long
PD4106-2784 No More
Fresno CA
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« Reply #23 on: May 26, 2012, 03:57:59 PM »

Geoff define "check book converter"lol it took a check book to convert my Eagle I got sick of pay Dick Wright and others
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« Reply #24 on: May 26, 2012, 04:10:21 PM »

I am sure that this could turn out to be a spectacular conversion.  Obviously, it is not for everyone.  Cost is one factor, the joy of tinkering is another.  It all depends on what you are looking for.  I, like some here, would be uncomfortable in a vehicle that is too impressive even if I could afford it, which is not to say I can not appreciate the innovation and craftsmanship that can be done.  I do enjoy looking at them.  There are just different ways of looking at the world though.  For example, my 5a has wood grain laminate on the walls.  There are some here that would feel that laminates are tacky enough and would ridicule the idea of trying to make plastic look like wood.  I, on the other hand, think that laminates can be amazingly durable and just happen to like the wood grain appearance.   Taking it from a different perspective, I have seen some wonderful craftsmanship in wood, particularly in pictures of yachts.  The funny thing is that those crafts have been developed to such a level of fluidity that it often seems that they are trying to make wood look like plastic.  Accomplishing this wood-to-plastic transformation is a terrific skill and demonstration of virtuosity.  If you like it, can do it or pay for it, and take pleasure in that result, go for it.  However, if you are of the opinion that lack of a very finite budget and various other rules of engagement would seem like playing tennis without the net, than play the game as you want.  It's all good, man.
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Geoff
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« Reply #25 on: May 26, 2012, 04:40:55 PM »

Geoff define "check book converter"lol it took a check book to convert my Eagle I got sick of pay Dick Wright and others

A "checkbook converter" is a person who converts a bus by paying others to do all the work and then takes credit for "his conversion" by acting like he did the conversion. 
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Geoff
'82 RTS AZ
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« Reply #26 on: May 26, 2012, 04:52:17 PM »

He is going to convert his own he is lucky he has employes what's wrong with paying someone to do things you have no idea on what you are doing

 I have paid before most of the time twice including the first time I screwed it up lol 

 Me I think it is neat a guy that can afford a 6 figure shell to convert his way ever since I knew him it was a dream for him to build his own bus now it looks like it is going to happen
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Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #27 on: May 26, 2012, 05:04:10 PM »

(snip)  ever since I knew him it was a dream for him to build his own bus now it looks like it is going to happen

     The "dream" is the thing ...
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
Geoff
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« Reply #28 on: May 26, 2012, 05:22:10 PM »

He is going to convert his own he is lucky he has employes what's wrong with paying someone to do things you have no idea on what you are doing

 I have paid before most of the time twice including the first time I screwed it up lol 

 Me I think it is neat a guy that can afford a 6 figure shell to convert his way ever since I knew him it was a dream for him to build his own bus now it looks like it is going to happen

Yes, I understand that completely.  But I was talking about taking credit for other people's work.  For instance, if you watch the car restoration shows on TV they always give credit to the people they call in to help them.  What I have a problem with is people that show off their conversions and act like THEY did all the work when they actually paid other people to do the work.  I have no problem paying skilled people to do work for you, just don't steal their work as your own.

--Geoff
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Geoff
'82 RTS AZ
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« Reply #29 on: May 26, 2012, 06:30:35 PM »

The stuff I've paid for labor on mine is pretty minimal.  Probably 2/3 of the mechanical work I paid for, but I did the rest.  I paid a friend $100 to help with his forklift to install the generator, but I was there and bolted it in, and I prepped the generator space beforehand.

The interior I did 100% myself except the flooring.  Well, I did have friends help with the interior, but their only pay was lunch or dinner.  I was there working right beside them the whole time.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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