Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
October 31, 2014, 02:31:36 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: You will not have to go out in the rain, sleet, hail, or snow to retrieve it.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1] 2 3  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Roof top AC  (Read 3158 times)
Gerry H
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 95


1992 Prevost LeMirage XL-40 8V92 740 Allison




Ignore
« on: July 02, 2012, 03:29:40 PM »

It's getting near time to add some roof top AC's to my conversion. Been thinking I would go with 2 Dometic Penquin 15K btu (low profile) units to start and possibly add a portable 12K inside to supplement. Thoughts and experience tips welcome. I've only found one place so far that sells them, so I could use some tips on where to buy also. Thanks Gerry H
Logged

Forest Lake, Minnesota
Land of 10,000 mosquitoes and a few cool buses
Bill B /bus
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 267





Ignore
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2012, 07:24:33 PM »

Searched the internet and bought from an outfit in Tennessee. No, I can't remember the name. Friendly people to deal with and the price was about the lowest. Came down to shipping cost. Which something to watch. Get a delivered price.

We're running two 13.5 Penguins in  a 40' without a problem at 95-100F and high humidity with comfortable temperatures inside the coach.

Bill
Logged

Bill & Lynn
MCI102A3, Series 50 w/HT70
Lin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4575

1965 MC-5a




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2012, 07:48:55 PM »

I do not know your setup.  Are you using the rooftops to cool you as you travel?  If so, you want the biggest unit you can get as far forward as it can go.  The bedroom, on the other hand can probably do quite well with a smaller unit.
Logged

You don't have to believe everything you think.
Barn Owl
Roanoke, VA
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2049


PD4106-1063 "Wheezy Bus"




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2012, 08:18:27 PM »

Quote
If so, you want the biggest unit you can get as far forward as it can go.

I second that. The biggest mistake I see in conversions, is placing the front AC to far back to do the driver any good. Build a platform five feet out over the front of your bus, mount the AC way out there, and pipe it back so it hits you in the face. This cools you in two ways, you would have the biggest sun blocking visor ever, and you get to enjoy the cold air before it gets sucked out of the bus. "One of these days" I am going to move mine as far forward as practical. It looks good where it is aesthetically, it just is not as effective as it could be.
Logged

L. Christley - W3EYE Amateur Extra
Blue Ridge Mountains, S.W. Virginia
Itís the education gained, and the ability to apply, and share, what we learn.
Have fun, be great, that way you have Great Fun!
Gerry H
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 95


1992 Prevost LeMirage XL-40 8V92 740 Allison




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2012, 05:45:31 AM »

I still have the OEM AC for while underway. Roof tops for parked. Roof not raised, so will mount one between living room area and kitchen and the other between bedroom and bath with a portable (to add) in the bedroom. Only seem to find the 13K size for sale and not the 15K Why is that??? Would like to pickup units rather than pay freight. Gerry H
Logged

Forest Lake, Minnesota
Land of 10,000 mosquitoes and a few cool buses
boxcarOkie
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1452





Ignore
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2012, 06:05:15 AM »

Only seem to find the 13K size for sale and not the 15K Why is that??? Would like to pickup units rather than pay freight. Gerry H




Both of mine are low profile Gerry and they are out there.  15K with heat pumps.  Check around some more.  One word of caution, if you have not pre-wired as of yet.  Put each unit on a separate feed and fuse (circuit) you will be glad you did this in the end.  This will ensure you can run BOTH units at the same time (when they cycle, they demand a lot of juice).  If you do not do this, then you are going to be in a "zone mode" the majority of the time.

Hope this helps.

BCO
« Last Edit: July 03, 2012, 02:25:46 PM by boxcarOkie » Logged

John316
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3261

MCI 1995 DL3, DD S60, Allison B500.




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2012, 06:08:51 AM »

I don't know what things are like for you, but here is what we have.

When it was 105, the other day, rolling down the road, three airs was really struggling to cool our bus (we have a total of five). Stopped two does just fine (even up to 110, and over). The problem comes in driving. We have the 15K low profiles, like you are looking at. So far they have worked well, and we like them.

I just read that you have the OEM AC for OTR. That is really good, and just about the only AC system to really cool running down the road. In some ways I wish we would have kept ours, but that is why they sold our bus in the first place. AC was not working (it was an old Peter Pan bus out of the NE). We spent several thousand working on it, and couldn't get it going. We figured that if they could get it fixed at Peter Pan, we should pull it out. It had a bunch of leaks and they had mixed charges, etc...but enough about that. I am glad you have the OTR air.

When stopped, we usually have on air running in the front and one in the back. Usually does just great. I think you will like the two 15K's.

I agree with BCO (our posts just crossed). We have a separate 20 amp circuit to each of ours and haven't regretted it.

FWIW

John
Logged

MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
David Anderson
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 844


South Texas in the Eagle Ford Shale area




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2012, 01:24:54 PM »

Coleman low profile 13.5k btu for me.  I have 3.  I ducted mine and put a Danhard 3 speed blower to suck the air from the plenum and dump it in the cockpit.  It works very well for me going down the road, and it also doubles as a window defroster Wink  My units are 11 years old, replaced one fan capacitor and one Coleman t-stat in that time span.

David
Logged
buswarrior
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3571


'75 MC8 8V71 HT740




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2012, 07:27:57 AM »

Absolutely, run a separate and dedicated circuit to each and every roof air.

If the power is available, you can CHOOSE to run 'em all!

Largest load in most conversions, by far, is the air conditioning.

Last place you want any warm wires or voltage loss, go up a wire size to 12 gauge at least.

I'll start a new thread about a dash air conversion kit.

happy coaching!
buswarrior



Logged

Frozen North, Greater Toronto Area
gus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3529





Ignore
« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2012, 04:38:33 PM »

You won't need more than two, one might even do it since you have the original for driving, that is the hardest time to cool when the sun is beating down on the driver. Most rooftop AC problems are because of this so you have it made.

Don't put one close to the bedroom or bath, you won't need it once stopped and you won't like the noise.

I would put one midway to partly forward and see how that works before installing two. Of course it is nice to have one up front in case the original fails.

I can't emphasize too much how one is not desirable in the bedroom or too close to it. This is a really common mistake made by most converters, that and not placing  one as far forward as possible.
Logged

PD4107-152
PD4104-1274
Ash Flat, AR
chev49
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 763




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2012, 07:12:44 AM »

i put ac by bed in my first bus 25 or so yrs ago, and in all the other 4.
but even with central heat/ air in the house, i have a window ac next to bed and have it on all night...winter or summer..
unless its like 30f or below that.
did discover in ak that if you leave window open all nite in bedroom at 15 or so below, the pipes in your master bedroom will start to freeze... Grin
Logged

If you want someone to hold your hand, join a union.
Union with Christ is the best one...
John316
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3261

MCI 1995 DL3, DD S60, Allison B500.




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: July 05, 2012, 07:36:16 AM »

I am going to disagree with Gus here (sorry Grin). We wouldn't have a bedroom without air in there. There are times when you really like the noise. Depending on where you are staying, it can be a little noisy outside. Turn that air on, and it is just enough fan noise to not hear the outside. Personally, I like to be able to feel cool air as I sleep. If you don't like it, you can turn it off. My theory is I would rather be over cooled then under cooled.
Logged

MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
Oonrahnjay
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1525





Ignore
« Reply #12 on: July 05, 2012, 08:24:02 AM »

 I am going to disagree with Gus here (sorry Grin). We wouldn't have a bedroom without air in there. There are times when you really like the noise. Depending on where you are staying, it can be a little noisy outside. Turn that air on, and it is just enough fan noise to not hear the outside. Personally, I like to be able to feel cool air as I sleep. If you don't like it, you can turn it off. My theory is I would rather be over cooled then under cooled.

     Yeah, that "white noise" from a fan can be a big help (depends on the situation, though).  And I agree with your theory.  (But I have to tell you that I'm in favor of automatic/ thermo systems that keep the temp where you want it -- I HATE being woken up at night for anything ... door bell, dog wanting to go outside to pee, *me* wanting to go outside to pee, alarm system, getting another blanket/taking a blanket off the bed, etc.)
« Last Edit: July 05, 2012, 08:30:23 AM by Oonrahnjay » Logged

Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
Lin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4575

1965 MC-5a




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: July 05, 2012, 12:18:43 PM »

We have two 13500 units.  One in the living room and one in the bedroom.  As mentioned before, the way I would do it different now is to have a bigger living room unit and put it as far front as I could.  I would still have one in the bedroom, but make it a small unit.  There is just not that much need for high capacity in that small room.  I do not like the fan noise at all, so most of the time when sleeping, we leave the bedroom door open and only put the front unit on.  However, there are times when you may want to close the door.  Having a separate unit makes that possible.  Also, after a days driving, there can be heat migrating up from the engine.  The bedroom unit helps deal with that.

I have added a deflector to the bottom of the front unit that blows all the air to the front.  This seems to work for us on the road since we are generally fine at around 80 degrees.  Therefore I think that another 1000 BTU's up front would be enough if we wanted to upgrade a bit.  We could put another rooftop unit in, but sometimes I consider getting one of those portable units and having it sit upfront with us. 
Logged

You don't have to believe everything you think.
Oonrahnjay
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1525





Ignore
« Reply #14 on: July 05, 2012, 12:36:48 PM »

  (snip)  sometimes I consider getting one of those portable units and having it sit upfront with us. 

    Lin, would you please post what you find if you look into the "portable" A/C units?  I considered one but all the ones I could find were low output (~7K BTU - i.e. about half the output of your roof airs), they were pretty bulky, besides dealing with the exhaust tube there was no way that they didn't pull in air that you'd already paid to cool to cool the condenser and then pump it overboard, they weren't cheap, didn't seem to look as if they'd like being permanently installed, and other issues that just made me think that they wouldn't work very well in a converted bus.  If you find different, please keep us informed.

Thanks,  Bruce H   NC   USA
Logged

Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
Pages: [1] 2 3  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!