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Author Topic: Engine preheat  (Read 4893 times)
Chaz
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« on: November 06, 2006, 06:54:13 AM »

Here's another one for ya:  Roll Eyes    Engine preheater.

   While I am going to use a Webasto or comperable aux. heater to do this, a mechanic friend suggested also having a plug it type engine heater as a backup also. Seems like a good idea. (?) I understand they aren't all that much money and could possibly get me out of a jam sometime if the aux. fails. 
  What do you all think? And, what type? I understand there are oil as well as water heaters.

  Thanx for the help,
     Chaz
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RJ
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« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2006, 07:17:02 AM »

Chaz -

Engine block heaters are far easier on that big old Detroit than trying to start it with ether when it's less than 40o outside.

Pick up the phone and call Luke (1-888-262-2434) and he'll have the correct one  on it's way to you today via UPS.

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink
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RJ Long
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larryh
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« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2006, 07:33:18 AM »

Good info Russ gave you if you never have to use it it is still worth the money  not that bad a price either

LarryH
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Quartzsite,
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« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2006, 07:34:47 AM »

Like usual, Russ is dead-on. A recent thread on a block heater part mismatch (and mishaps) tells me Luke is the one to buy 'em from.

The block heater that heats the coolant is the one you want... four bolts, and just little mess with the coolant to install. A pan or oil heater won't do it as well as heating the coolant. Mine uses about 1500 watts. Although my DD can easily start when it's marginal (30-40), I plugged in the block heater for an hour before I started her in Iowa and St. Louis last week when the temps dropped below 40. It makes this nice ticking sound as the big mass of iron heats up, and the front of the block gets warm to the touch... my DD said, "Ahhhhh... warm oil starts... thanks!"

HTH,
Brian B.
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Brian Brown
4108-216 w/ V730
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« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2006, 09:01:54 AM »

Echoing everyone's advice to get a recirculating heater rather than an oil pan heater.  Try pouring straight 40 oil at temps below 40 F and you will see why a little heat is important.  These old girls sure like to have just a little heat to get them going.

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Jerry Liebler
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« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2006, 09:27:43 AM »

Chaz,
     With a Webasto plumbed to do engine preheat the addition of an electric preheater is simply not needed.  There are so many other places where a back up system is more likely to be needed.  The Webasto will preheat the engine at least 3 times as fast as an electric heater and it's a pretty reliable and dependable system.
Regards
Jerry 4107 1120
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RJ
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« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2006, 04:43:47 PM »

Jerry -

Good point.

However, IIUC, Chaz wanted something for the time being, until he got his Webasto system up and running.

I think. . .

 Wink
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RJ Long
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Chaz
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« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2006, 05:33:03 PM »

 Your right Russ, but my buddy brought up the idea that it's not a bad idea to have a back up in that dept in case the aux heater should fail or there is some sort of problem. (read Murphy's Law)
  I'm hoping I don't have trouble, but what do you think? Is there much to worry about there? It was instilled in me in the NAVY to "C.Y.A."   Wink

  Thanx guys.
     Chaz
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« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2006, 05:56:49 PM »

I guess it depends on what you plan on doing with the bus this winter. The block heater is something you could install in a few hours. A diesel-fired heater might take awhile to get plumbed in and operational, and if you need to use the bus in the interim the block heater could get you fired off.

Or, depending on your usage, you might decide to save $ and go with a propane RV furnace or something. We're presently using electric heat when parked and plugged in, which is maybe 75% of the nights. A 1500 watt oil-filled "radiator" in the back bedroom and a 1500 watt squirell-cage heater in the front has kept us toasty and still under 30A of power. We only use the propane furnace when between the poles or if it gets REALLY cold.

Diesel-fired radiant heat is obviously much nicer, but our winter usage is fairly minimal, except for the occassional skiing daytrip.

Anyways, look at your usage and plans for this winter and then decide.

HTH,
Brian B.
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Brian Brown
4108-216 w/ V730
Longmont, CO
Ross
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« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2006, 07:50:24 PM »

Im not putting an engine loop on the Proheat system because the electric block heater works just fine.  Adding the engine loop also means more pumps and/or valves which means more money.  If I need to start the bus in the dead cold, the block heater heats it up enough in about an hour or so.

Ross
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gumpy
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« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2006, 04:55:29 AM »

Im not putting an engine loop on the Proheat system because the electric block heater works just fine.  Adding the engine loop also means more pumps and/or valves which means more money.  If I need to start the bus in the dead cold, the block heater heats it up enough in about an hour or so.

Yeah, but what if you have to get outta Dodge in a big hurry. Say the cops are hot on your trail; the hounds are barking at your heels. You just don't have time to wait for that slow electric element to do it's thing. You gotta have the quick start!!  Plumb an 80K BTU Webasto into that engine loop and it'll warm her up to starting temps in under 8 minutes!! You won't even have enough time to pull your sewer and water hoses and coil up the electric cable. Just get in and go!
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Craig Shepard
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Ross
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« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2006, 05:32:51 AM »

If I gotta get out of dodge in that big of a hurry, I won't be taking the bus. Smiley
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Chaz
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« Reply #12 on: November 07, 2006, 05:45:35 AM »

LOLOLOL The comedy team of Ross and Gumpy! lol

  I'm really just doing it as a back up. It seems like cheap insurance and if it gets me out of a jam one time, it would be worth it.

  Ross is right tho, if I have to "beat feet" that quick, I have some fast cars that would probably be a better bet!  Grin Grin Grin

  Chaz
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DrivingMissLazy
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« Reply #13 on: November 07, 2006, 06:25:01 AM »

You can spend your money much more wisely than on a pre-heat back up. In fact a can of starter fluid would do that. Remember you can not back up everything and the reason people convert these monsters is due to reliability and no requirement to back up everything.
Richard
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Chaz
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« Reply #14 on: November 07, 2006, 06:40:43 AM »

Quote
the reason people convert these monsters is due to reliability

  Yeah, that is my opinion also, but starting fluid won't start her when it's cold out.
 
   That reminds me........... time to post yet another question!  Grin  "I got a million of 'em"!!  lol

Chaz
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Pix of my bus here: http://s58.photobucket.com/albums/g279/Skulptor/Motor%20Coach/
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"Imagination is more important than knowledge". Albert Einstein
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