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Author Topic: Where is a fire most likely if one were to have one?  (Read 1720 times)
buswarrior
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'75 MC8 8V71 HT740




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« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2012, 09:09:07 PM »

As noted...

Once there's a fire, you've already blown it.

Fire prevention lies squarely in keeping up preventive maintenance and proper electrical design of additional systems.

Who hasn't torn down the wheel ends lately for inspection, cleaning and fresh lube? Greased the S cam tubes?

Cleaned the flues on the propane appliances?

How old are the external fuel lines on that Detroit?

When were the big electrical cables ruthlessly inspected, absolutely every inch? That old stock heavy cable from batteries to starter, lurking, tucked into the engine frame rail on your older MCI.... rubbing against??

Every circuit protected? Including the big cables? What hot bus bar is the stereo wired into with no fuse?

Nobody can carry enough extinguisher or water to put out a tire fire,
and many engine fires are beyond control into the other materials by the time you can get into a position to bring all of your arsenal into play.

Those who define prevention by maintenance and good design are the ones who sleep soundly.

And one lung full of good coach burning smoke... you might not be here to tell us about it.

Install smoke and CO detectors for lives.

When they alarm, get out.

Purchase insurance for the property.

happy coaching!
buswarrior



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Frozen North, Greater Toronto Area
luvrbus
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« Reply #16 on: July 26, 2012, 10:08:49 PM »

I think your chances of saving your bus are a lot better in a bus with metal siding  

I have saw the H Prevost and the new MCI J and E on fire, once they get going they burn to the ground it's almost impossiable to stop when the siding starts to burn fire depts just watch because of the toxic smoke produced by fiberglass.

We loose tour buses in valley here quite often I think the 115 degree heat helps with the burning not for sure but it seems like not as many lost in the winter months 

There was a 45 ft Monco burn down a couple of weeks ago that started from a tire it was gone in 8 mins the fire dept told me 

The owner suffered some 3rd degree burns he was trying to ext the fire with a cheap ext that came with the coach and the tire blew out covering him with hot burning rubber it started a huge fire on a piece of vacant land also.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2012, 10:27:28 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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happycamperbrat
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« Reply #17 on: July 28, 2012, 01:03:29 AM »

Dang! Thanks for all the warnings and horror stories..... wow!
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The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
Eagle
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« Reply #18 on: July 28, 2012, 06:31:32 AM »

The Dometic and Norcold RV Refrigerators are a BIG source for RV fires.  I know this first hand as this past September my neighbor woke me at 2:30AM on a Saturday and said Mr Barnett your Bus is on fire.  By the time I got some clothes on and got out the back door of our home the local fire dept was waiting on me and the fire was exiting the roof of the bus above the fridge.  The heat from the plastic burning in the fridge was so hot it burnt a hole in the roof of the bus about 3 feet in diameter.  If this had been a SS coach it would have burnt to the ground with all of the fiberglass in those units.  With a bus and all of the metal the fire dept was able to save the coach where it was still drivable but thanks to National Interstate Insurance Company they totaled it due to the structural damage, water and smoke damage.  Check out the www.copart.com web site and look at all of the RV's they have on there and most are from fires.  (It only took the fire dept 2 minuets to be on the scene after they received the call)
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happycamperbrat
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« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2012, 11:39:56 AM »

I know there are some kind of fires that water doesnt help...... but maybe it would be wise to hook up a sprinkler system in the roof, that is supplied by the fresh water system? The one in the roof would just be part of the fresh water loop? And maybe even run some lines to the bays and the engine compartment (maybe as part of a misting system)
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The Little GTO is a 102" wide and 40' long 1983 GMC RTS II and my name is Teresa in case I forgot to sign my post
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