Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
September 02, 2014, 05:27:37 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an E-Mag Subscription: It will not turn yellow, get musty, dusty, and mildewed or fade.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Toilet Install  (Read 1967 times)
Tikvah
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 528



WWW

Ignore
« on: August 06, 2012, 11:05:15 AM »

I'm installing my new Thetford Aria Deluxe II.  The instructions show how to "replace" a toilet, but no information about the installation of the floor flange.

Do I go to the local hardware store and get a residential floor flange?  I will have 3" PVC going straight down into my tank.  What do I need?

The package came with a toilet "seal".  A residential toilet has a "wax ring"  This seal seems smaller than a wax ring.  Ideas?

Dave
Logged

I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5426




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2012, 11:44:39 AM »

I used a standard toilet flange like you can get at any home improvement or hardware store.  The foam gasket kinda fits more towards the center of the flange, but it works fine.  I'm not sure anything you buy at an RV dealer for a flange would be any different.

The instructions probably assume replacing a toilet on an existing flange.  It would be pretty rare to replace the flange in an RV unless the floor rotted out or something.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Tikvah
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 528



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2012, 11:58:08 AM »

That was my guess.

On a separate but related question.   What type of fitting do I get for the exit of my black tank?
Is this standard PVC schedule 40 or 30? 
Does it accept a male fitting, or the pipe?

Logged

I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
wal1809
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1330




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2012, 12:15:52 PM »

I used a way ring from Home Depot.

On another note I saw your going to shoot a straight vertical pipe from toilet to black.  I wouldn't do that.  Mine is set up that way and there is no driving down the road with stuff in that tank.  The stank finds its way to the inside of the bus.  Not good.  I usually don't drive with anything in there.  I will no longer turn the key until I have that issue resolved.
Logged

1984 Silver Eagle Model 10 6V92 Allison auto tranny
www.snakebreaker.com
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6751





Ignore
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2012, 12:44:07 PM »

Wal-sounds like your toilet ball valve is not sealing well.  When driving you should have about an inch of water above the ball valve to keep the stank from the tank.  If the water doesn't stay in the toilet-time to rebuild the ball valve.  Also, make sure your vent is building back pressure when driving.  I found that leaving the Fantastic vent in the bathroom cracked at all times makes a big difference. Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6751





Ignore
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2012, 12:47:06 PM »

Tikvah-as to your tank drain-not sure if a PVC or ABS pipe will glue to that pipe flange.  I had the same kind of tank on my bus.  I simply took a female 3" ABS, cut a slit on either side, then used silicone to seal it and a U bolt to clamp it.  It works well-doesn't leak-but then you still have the advantage of being able to take the pipe off the tank if the need arises.  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
wal1809
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1330




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2012, 12:48:47 PM »

Wal-sounds like your toilet ball valve is not sealing well.  When driving you should have about an inch of water above the ball valve to keep the stank from the tank.  If the water doesn't stay in the toilet-time to rebuild the ball valve.  Also, make sure your vent is building back pressure when driving.  I found that leaving the Fantastic vent in the bathroom cracked at all times makes a big difference. Good Luck, TomC

There is no ball valve.  There is the flapper in the bottom of the toilet and that is all.  Luvrbus was talking about a flapper but I think it was lower that the comode in the pipe.  Oh the tak is not vented either.
Logged

1984 Silver Eagle Model 10 6V92 Allison auto tranny
www.snakebreaker.com
Tenor
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 991



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2012, 12:59:21 PM »

Dave,
I also just used the standard residential plastic flange for my toilet.  No issues.  It was a snap to put in.  My toilet drops straight into the tank, and I have a some odor issue, but it is due to the blade that slides sideways not quite sealing properly.  The water does not stand in my bowl. 

Glenn Williams
Logged

Glenn Williams
Lansing, MI
www.threemenandatenor.com
1968 MCI 7 Ser. No. 7476 Unit No. 10056
8v71
4 speed Spicer
Tikvah
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 528



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2012, 01:04:46 PM »

That's what I'll do then, I'll get a residential toilet flange and get that part of the job done.  I'm not worried about odor.  I will have a good vent and this toilet has a nice seal on the flapper.  Should hold water just fine.

I'm still wondering about the black tank exit.  The O.D. of the port in the picture above is 3-3/4".  I have a slide gate valve that is 3-1/2" I.D.  I don't know what to use.

Dave
Logged

I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
Lin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4545

1965 MC-5a




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2012, 01:24:05 PM »

Straight drop to tank is best.  If odor comes up, there is definitely a seal problem and maybe a vent problem too.
Logged

You don't have to believe everything you think.
goutoe
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 81





Ignore
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2012, 01:30:55 PM »

I recently had to replace my dump valves, I had to cut the short piece of pipe glued between the tank and the valve not leaving much room to glue to so I purchased a Fernco flexible coupling which clamped over the socket end of the tank and over the socket end of the valve, it works real well and is not too rigid, the rubber also dampens the vibration, just an idea? remember to get a socket to socket coupling. and check O.D first. This also makes a great union when you need to service, or replace valves.
Logged

John & Linda 1977 AM General 6V92 turbo Detroit 3 Speed allison, 40 ft.
Tikvah
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 528



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2012, 01:32:37 PM »

Yup, I have a straight drop.  

I contacted the tank company.  This is their comment: "The 3 opening on that tank is like a slip fitting.  You put your pipe into it and clamp it down."

The inside diameter of the blank tank fitting is about 3-3/8" and the same for the dump valve.  So, I need to go to the hardware and find what type of 3" pipe has 3-3/8 O.D.  When I figure that out I'll post so it might help somebody in the future.  I can't image I'm the only person who doesn't already know Smiley   (or, maybe I am  Tongue)

Dave
Logged

I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
Tikvah
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 528



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: August 06, 2012, 01:34:04 PM »

I recently had to replace my dump valves, I had to cut the short piece of pipe glued between the tank and the valve not leaving much room to glue to so I purchased a Fernco flexible coupling which clamped over the socket end of the tank and over the socket end of the valve, it works real well and is not too rigid, the rubber also dampens the vibration, just an idea? remember to get a socket to socket coupling. and check O.D first. This also makes a great union when you need to service, or replace valves.

Great Idea - Thanks!
Logged

I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
John316
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3224

MCI 1995 DL3, DD S60, Allison B500.




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: August 06, 2012, 07:37:10 PM »

Dave,

We have learned a few things. First off, a straight drop into your tank is essential (sorry Wal, gonna disagree with you here). If you put elbows in there, whee. Try plunging that thing. Yuk. Drop it straight down. Then your toilet should have a good seal and no fumes will come up. Make sure you have a vent on it and we have been hunky dor.

Also, I would suggest something a little heavier on the flange. Our first go around was the standard plastic house flange. A year later we were parked and wondering where that really bad smell was coming from. Then we find sewage leaking in our wet bay. Turns out the flange had cracked and was allowing liquid to leak out. We installed a metal flange with a SCH 80 (not SCH 40) drop pipe in there. Then Fernco onto the tank.

Just what we have learned.

John
Logged

MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
Dave5Cs
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1522


1979 MCI MC5Cs 6V-71 HT-740 Allison, Roseville, CA




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: August 06, 2012, 08:10:02 PM »

Dave measure 3 inch ABS on the outside should fit inside.

We have 1.5 foot angled 3 inch ABS drain from toilet to tank center to center with 45 degree fernco fitting on the bottom and 45 degree same fitting at top which makes it easy to get the tank out if needed and never plugs up, no odor.

We also used a Schedule 80 flange only way to go. Run a bead of clear silicone under flange and then your rubber seal on top then your toilet and bolt it down with brass flange bolts. put a bead on color match silicone around base of toilet also.

I won't do the straight down shot because of the proverbial pile of poo which can block off the end of the pipe if not emptied in time. Just a thought.

Dave5Cs Cool Roll Eyes Grin
« Last Edit: August 06, 2012, 08:31:48 PM by Dave5Cs » Logged

John316
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3224

MCI 1995 DL3, DD S60, Allison B500.




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2012, 08:07:19 AM »

I won't do the straight down shot because of the proverbial pile of poo which can block off the end of the pipe if not emptied in time. Just a thought.

Dave5Cs Cool Roll Eyes Grin

Dave does have a point. Our tank is 150 gallons and we move quite a bit. There is no fear that that "stacking up." That is certainly something to keep in mind.

John
Logged

MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
chev49
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 763




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: August 07, 2012, 08:35:15 AM »

I have used a straight line from toilet to tank in all my busses since 1990 or so. I use flexible joints in the line in case of movement.  Occasionally have to spray inside it with the wand thingie...
Logged

If you want someone to hold your hand, join a union.
Union with Christ is the best one...
usbusin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 501


'60 PD4104-4355(sold) Now Freightliner Conversion




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: August 07, 2012, 09:05:11 AM »

We had a straight drop on our 4104 bus with 16 years and 150,000+ miles.  On our Freightliner conversion we have a straight drop and 12 years and 126,000+ miles, never a problem.

We do have means to "back-flush" the black tank with the grey water.  The procedure is;
(1) dump the black tank,
(2) leave black tank valve open, shut the main discharge valve and then open the grey tank valve to "back-flush" the black tank,
(3) close the grey tank valve and open the main discharge valve to dump the back-flush from the black tank,
(4) close black tank valve and drain grey tank.

A very simple operation once you get used to it and never a problem with sewage in 28 years!

Just the way we do it!

GaryD
Logged

Gary D

USBUSIN was our 1960 PD4104 for 16 years Ustruckin' is our 2001 Freightliner truck conversion
gus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3507





Ignore
« Reply #18 on: August 07, 2012, 01:15:33 PM »

Simpler yet is one tank, just dump and go. Flushing is automatic with grey water in the tank.

Fresh water flushing is a waste of time.
Logged

PD4107-152
PD4104-1274
Ash Flat, AR
Ace
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1162





Ignore
« Reply #19 on: August 07, 2012, 02:39:59 PM »

Gus I would agree!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Logged

Ace Rossi
Lakeland, Fl. 33810
Prevost H3-40
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!