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Author Topic: Alcoa wheels  (Read 1712 times)
uemjg
jerry
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« on: August 16, 2012, 04:06:25 PM »

What is average cost for a complete set of alcoa aluminum wheels for a 1975 mci7?
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TomC
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« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2012, 10:17:24 PM »

About $275.00 apiece and you need long enough wheel studs to accommodate the thicker wheels.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
bkelly1011
Brad Kelly
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« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2012, 04:02:14 AM »

You can also save a little by keeping the inner rear duals as they are and not replacing them with aluminum.
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Busnut wannabe.
DebDav
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« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2012, 07:19:03 AM »

www.fleetwheel.com
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luvrbus
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« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2012, 07:40:10 AM »

There is more to it that than just buying wheels you need the right ones, a wheel for a MCI will cost around 400 bucks buy the right outset,inset, width and capacity and they are not cheap.

I see it from time to time people complain about the way the bus handles after installing aluminum wheels they bought used from a salvage yard they need the right wheel and not all aluminum wheels are created equal and the sellers don't care lol  

If you do not have the right studs ask yourself is it worth it 60 studs at around 10 bucks each plus labor labor to install big hit just for aluminum wheels if you use steel and aluminum on the drive axle you can get by with just longer nuts for around 5 bucks each
 
good luck
« Last Edit: August 17, 2012, 07:48:27 AM by luvrbus » Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
gus
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« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2012, 11:55:05 AM »

Save your money, Al wheels are a pain. I just removed my two front ones when I had a slow leak and will remove the rears next time a tire problem comes up.

My main complaint is the tiny holes which make checking tire press a PAITA!

Anyone can have mine, which had 12:00R x 22.5, 16 Ply tires, for $100 apiece! My new steel wheels cost more than that!
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PD4107-152
PD4104-1274
Ash Flat, AR
BJ
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« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2012, 09:40:41 PM »

go to a truck salvage and purchase freight lines alum wheels...way cheaper
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wagwar
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« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2012, 09:17:54 AM »

refurbed steel wheels, blasted and powder-coated (or have your own wheels refurbed) can be found for as liitle as $20 each. Add to that the dismount/mount, balancing, etc. You'll be way ahead in the long run. Just MHO.
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rv_safetyman
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« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2012, 09:26:17 AM »

We go through this every time the subject comes up.  There are two types of wheels: stud piloted and hub piloted.  You probably have stud piloted, but you will need to know before you go looking for used wheels.

If they are stud piloted, and you are looking at used aluminum, be sure to check for cracking around the stud bores or anywhere in the hub area.  I think that is less of an issue with hub piloted, but you still need to check.

Jim
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Jim Shepherd
Evergreen, CO
85 Eagle 10/Series 60/Eaton AutoShift 10 speed transmission
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Bus Project details: http://beltguy.com/Bus_Project/busproject.htm
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uemjg
jerry
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« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2012, 04:31:52 PM »

Well I guess I will focus on getting nice wheel cover simulators.
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muldoonman
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« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2012, 04:51:19 PM »

To me, there's nothing like the look of a polished set of alcoas. My coach has had um on since new, no leaks or cracks. Come on the Prevost factory build sheet.
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PP
Will & Wife
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« Reply #11 on: August 31, 2012, 07:03:33 PM »

I'm with you Muldoonman. Nothing beats a nice set of polished Alcoa's. When I put new tires on a few weeks back, i switched the inner duals with the tags and have been polishing on them, but even after running on the inside for 20 years, they're pretty  Smiley
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lostagain
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« Reply #12 on: August 31, 2012, 07:12:18 PM »

uemjg,

simulators will cover up your wheels, preventing you from visually checking your lug nuts for looseness, and feeling the hubs for hot bearings with your hands. I like to do that when we stop for a break after running for a couple of hours.

JC
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JC
Invermere, BC
1977 MC5C, 6V92/HT740
gus
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« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2012, 12:57:59 PM »

Forget the simulators, worse than Al wheels.

Paint them a nice white and anytime they get messed up just spray another coat, works great and they look great.
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PD4107-152
PD4104-1274
Ash Flat, AR
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