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Author Topic: how hard is it to cobble together a timer for my proheat X45 (or other 12V thing  (Read 549 times)
zubzub
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« on: September 08, 2012, 01:39:47 PM »

I have a nice new proheat but it just has the on /off switch.  the unit is self contained so really only needs timer the opens and closes a contact at a specific time.  What would be a good source for an inexpensive programmable timer? Proheat timer costs $275 which seems a little high for a basic on off timer (12V)
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Geoff
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« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2012, 05:55:09 PM »

Webasto makes a timer for their Scholastic series, I don't know if it is any cheaper.  I only start my Webasto when I am watching it to make sure their are no air bubbles in the system that would cause it to overheat and blow a fuse.

--Geoff
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Geoff
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Sean
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« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2012, 06:07:44 AM »

If you just want a timer that you set manually to run the unit for a set period of time, get a wind-up Intermatic timer at the hardware store.  These are the timers you see in bathrooms to make the heat lamp work, or on hotel spas to run the jets, etc..  They come in a variety of time lengths, from 15 minutes to 2 hours.  You turn the knob to the time you want.

If you want something that will turn the unit on when you are not around, get a programmable thermostat.  We use the Lux 500 model, about $15 at a big-box store.  On the Heat setting, these provide a simple contact closure which you can wire in where the on/off switch goes.  If you need a heavier current rating, use it to switch your 12v or 24v house supply to feed a relay.  Not only do these have a weekly timer, they are, of course, thermostats, so they won't turn the unit on if it's not needed.

HTH,

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
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