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Author Topic: 12/240 inverter charger - the new frontier?  (Read 1291 times)
buswarrior
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« on: September 27, 2012, 06:33:17 AM »

Well, there was day not so many years ago, when busnuts were thought crazy for installing a big Trace SW4024 in a bus conversion.

And then it became a desirable thing to do for many.

Is this the next frontier?

http://www.altestore.com/store/Inverters/Off-Grid-Inverters-Capable-of-Grid-Tie/font-color-redSPECIALfont-Xantrex-XW6048-InverterCharger-and-XW-MPPT-60A-Charge-Controller/p10328/?utm_campaign=store_specials_092612&utm_medium=email&utm_source=alte_specials

A pure sign wave inverter charger with 120/240 split phase,
no more limits on using desirable 240 volt appliances,
and less complexity in setting up a typical 50 amp capable wiring system.

18 000 watt capacity.

48 volt battery bank keeps the wiring sizes under control.

Some smart busnut will figure out how to whip up a 48 volt alternator for the coach engine to spin,
or just run the generator to recharge.

A bit of solar to top it all off,

And you've got the neatest boondocking capabilities on the block.

Altestore happens to have a package on sale at the moment, their flyer is where I stumbled on this.

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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Jeremy
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« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2012, 12:27:06 PM »

It's likely that I'm completely missing the point here, but wouldn't a standard 240v inverter and a 240v to 120v converter be almost as good at a fraction of the cost? Or just build your bus with an entirely 240v system (maybe that would be impractical - I don't know how readily available small 240v appliances are in the States).

Converters to switch between the two voltages aren't expensive - for example here's a 4000w (2500w continuous) 240v to 120v converter for $220 (AUD and USD are almost identical at the moment):

http://performanceshop.com.au/4000W-240V-to-120V-Stepdown-Voltage-Converter-8Zed_3165.html


Jeremy

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wyle.e.kyote
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« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2012, 09:08:19 PM »

fwiw, the XW6048 Can be banked at either 24vdc or 48vdc.
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Sean
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« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2012, 11:30:40 PM »

fwiw, the XW6048 Can be banked at either 24vdc or 48vdc.


Really?  From where are you getting this?  Schneider's specifications list input DC voltage limits for the XW6048 as 44-64vdc.  They also list an input current limit of 130a (DC), which would only yield 3kW of output power, not the rated 6kW, if it operated at 24vdc nominal.  Perhaps you are thinking of its sibling, the XW4024?

-Sean
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« Last Edit: September 28, 2012, 07:45:28 AM by Sean » Logged

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belfert
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« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2012, 11:39:22 AM »

It's likely that I'm completely missing the point here, but wouldn't a standard 240v inverter and a 240v to 120v converter be almost as good at a fraction of the cost? Or just build your bus with an entirely 240v system (maybe that would be impractical - I don't know how readily available small 240v appliances are in the States).

The American standard is 115/120 volt 60 hertz and the European standard is typically 230/240 volt 50 hertz.  Probably 75% of the stuff in an American house runs off 115/120 volt 60 hertz.  Things that might run on 230/240 volt are water heaters, large electric heaters, and central air conditioners.  Small appliances are basically non-existent in 230/240 volt.

That converter you linked to supplies 115/120 volt at 50 hertz.  Some things don't care about hertz, but some do.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
wyle.e.kyote
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« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2012, 08:58:41 PM »



Really?  From where are you getting this?  Schneider's specifications list input DC voltage limits for the XW6048 as 44-64vdc.
Right off their spec sheets  The "limits" are the maximum ..  download the wiring pdfs from the website .. I'm not near my computer that has the links, but I'll see if I can get them for you in the morning. 


« Last Edit: October 02, 2012, 09:01:12 PM by wyle.e.kyote » Logged
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