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Author Topic: Gasoline/carburetor gumming  (Read 2238 times)
boogiethecat
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« Reply #15 on: November 30, 2012, 09:19:57 AM »

Convert it to propane.  Problem solved, simple, cheap, most of all RELIABLE\I
It'll sit for years and start on the first cranking
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1962 Crown
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Iceni John
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« Reply #16 on: November 30, 2012, 12:38:26 PM »

Convert it to propane.  Problem solved, simple, cheap, most of all RELIABLE\I
It'll sit for years and start on the first cranking
I plan on doing that.   Champion's website no longer lists any LPG generators  -  they used to have a few LPG models.   Do I need to replace the entire carburetor, or can I adapt my present carb?   Are there kits available to do this?   FYI, it's a 196cc Honda-clone engine.   Fortunately I have a spare outlet on my LPG manifold that can feed it.   If it's not a major job I'll convert it soon.

Thanks, John
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1990 Crown 2R-40N-552:  6V92TAC, DDEC II, HT740, Jake.      Hecho en Chino.     
Behind the Orange Curtain, SoCal.
wg4t50
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« Reply #17 on: November 30, 2012, 02:25:27 PM »

Yes, LP or Nat Gas is perfered for simple and easy operation.  Depends on the engine, some are very simple to adapt to the vapor fuel, some take a new mixer/carb setup.
Only down side to the LP fuel, is the cost, sure is nice, just expensive fuel, why I built a 12 kw diesel, burns 1/3 the gal of the LP dling the exact same load.
Do what makes you happy
Dave
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MCI7 20+ Yrs
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opus
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« Reply #18 on: November 30, 2012, 03:32:58 PM »

Aside from being more costly, you'll lose 25% power too.
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1995 BB All-American - A Transformation.
Iceni John
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« Reply #19 on: November 30, 2012, 04:25:34 PM »

I'm not worried about the cost  -  my generator is only for very occasional emergency use, not my primary source of electricity.   If I lose some output power, again it won't matter much.   I just want to be sure that if/when I actually need it to run, it does.

Thanks, John
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1990 Crown 2R-40N-552:  6V92TAC, DDEC II, HT740, Jake.      Hecho en Chino.     
Behind the Orange Curtain, SoCal.
Hi yo silver
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« Reply #20 on: December 02, 2012, 10:13:57 PM »

I like "Sea-Foam" gas treatment. Like others mentioned above, just put the prescribed amount (I just approximate it, using about four ounces per five gallons of gas) before I fill the can. It's automatically well mixed when I fill the can. Then I pour from the five gallon can to smaller containers for mixing 2 cycle oil. I don't run them dry, just leave the gas in them until I use them next, sometimes three or four months at a time. I have about 14 different gas powered gadgets around here and the SeaFoam works well for me. The best price I've found is at Northern Tool. No carb problems in about seven years now. (Knock on wood)
So Far, So Good...
Dennis   
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boogiethecat
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« Reply #21 on: December 03, 2012, 09:47:07 AM »

I use these guys.  You can do it 2 or 3 different ways.  I simply buy the garretson model KN regulator (it's highly recommended- others don't perform as well), take the carb off and drill a 1/4 inch hole up through the middle of the main jet into the venturi, solder a 1/2" brass hose barb to a piece of 1/4" brass tubing and cram it up into the hole just drilled so that it sticks about halfway into the venturi.  Then use a 1/2" ID hose to hook the hose-barb to the regulator's output, with a 1/4" gate valve in the middle.  The gate valve serves as a richness adjustment- it's somewhat tricky to adjust the first time but once you've got it running it's simple to tune and it's good forever without readjusting.
This method costs about a hundred bucks (mostly for the KN regulator) and takes me about half an hour.  You can occasionally find KN's much cheaper on ebay

If you want to do it simpler and less permanent, use a kit from these guys.

http://www.propanecarbs.com/tri_fuel_kits.html
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1962 Crown
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HB of CJ
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« Reply #22 on: December 03, 2012, 10:21:17 AM »

Is the fuel tank coated?  Maybe you have a incompatability (sp) with the type of fuel you are using.  The tank coating and rubber fuel lines (if any) are literally melting and clogging the carb?  FWIW, we always ran the gas out of the carb, be it airplanes, bikes, boats, tractors. etc.., particularily (another sp) if stored any time.  I can't speeeel today.  HB of CJ (old coot who needs his coffed) Smiley Smiley Smiley
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belfert
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« Reply #23 on: December 03, 2012, 01:11:09 PM »

I've heard that the ethanol in E10 gasoline will dissolve certain types of fuel lines.  That probably explains why I had a fuel leak on my Stihl weed whip.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Iceni John
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« Reply #24 on: December 03, 2012, 07:32:22 PM »

If you want to do it simpler and less permanent, use a kit from these guys.
http://www.propanecarbs.com/tri_fuel_kits.html


Their website is helpful.   Maybe that's how I'll do it, with the conversion kit they sell for Champion's carbs.

Thanks, John
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1990 Crown 2R-40N-552:  6V92TAC, DDEC II, HT740, Jake.      Hecho en Chino.     
Behind the Orange Curtain, SoCal.
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