Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
July 24, 2014, 03:59:29 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: 500 Members as of May 5th, 2006.  Smiley  3,499 Members as of October 21, 2012 Cheesy

   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Sitting over the winter  (Read 867 times)
Tikvah
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 517



WWW

Ignore
« on: December 03, 2012, 07:23:03 AM »

I was reading another post about fuel additives and it got me thinking... it happens occasionally  Grin

This will be the second winter that my bus will sit.  I didn't start it this summer, so a total of two years without firing the engine.  I have a full tank of fuel, but should I add anything to my tank to protect the fuel system?

Is there anything else I should consider?

The batteries are out and have been on a 1amp 24V smart charger

Dave
« Last Edit: December 03, 2012, 07:25:42 AM by Tikvah » Logged

I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
grantgoold
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1028





Ignore
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2012, 07:28:49 AM »

What weather conditions is the fuel exposed to? In previous posts it seems like many nuts suggested anti-gel additives. I have done this for a few years now during the winter (never exposed to prolonged periods of freezing) and I have never had any problems.

Is there someone you trust to go by the bus and run it for some period of time for the bearings, tires and so forth?

Grant
Logged

Grant Goold
1984 MCI 9
Way in Over My Head!
Citrus Heights, California
Tikvah
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 517



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2012, 07:40:06 AM »

I'm in a cold climate, top of Michigan.  The bus is in my driveway.

Quote
Is there someone you trust to go by the bus and run it for some period of time for the bearings, tires and so forth?

I've intentionally not started it.  My reasoning is that it is better to sit than to run without being heated up and run down the road a good distance.  The engine is new (about 25,000 miles).
Logged

I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
buswarrior
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3571


'75 MC8 8V71 HT740




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2012, 07:57:52 AM »

On the fuel front, being in a northern climate, I'll suggest there's nothing to do to the fuel.

On the engine front, another hot topic...

If the engine has not been turned over in an extended period, did you store it according to the DD procedures?

There will be cylinders open to the wind blowing up the tailpipe, with resulting rust forming on the cylinder walls and open valve seats.

Just sitting there, the engine and drive train can accumulate condensation internally the same as the fuel tank with every day's temperature change.

As with everything else, there is compromise between run it, don't run it, drive it, don't drive it, store it, don't store it....

Everyone has an opinion, you pay the bills, you have to make up your own.

What do the folks who have to earn an income with their machines do with all those industrial engines, back-up generators, crawlers/dozers and other periodically used engines?

Just run 'em?

happy coaching!
buswarrior
Logged

Frozen North, Greater Toronto Area
trucktramp
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 260




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2012, 09:43:26 AM »

If you bought your fuel during cold weather from a local or northern fuel stop, then it is already treated for winter.  Most northern truckstops have "winter blend" fuel that has some type of conditioner added to it.  If the fuel in it was purchased during the summer or in the south then it may be straight diesel.  The conditioner usually has some sort of algicide to kill the crap that lives in the diesel.
Logged

Dennis Watson
KB8KNP
Scotts, Michigan
1966 MCI MC5A
8V71
Spicer 4 Speed Manual
HB of CJ
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1231




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2012, 10:37:58 AM »

Excellent answers already given.  Yep...keep the fuel tank full.  Consider plugging off the exhaust pipe and air cleaner to keep various things out, including cooties, bugs, varmits, moisture and whatever.  Will your trickle charger be enough to counteract the self discharge rate of your starter batts?  Will you have to add water?  Good luck.  HB of CJ
Logged
robertglines1
steam nut
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3969





Ignore
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2012, 04:34:31 PM »

Dave: I know you like the snowmobile trails and trips across Big lake to Mac Island.! But Time to head south!!!!   Bus won't need help then.   Bob
Logged

Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12064




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2012, 05:16:44 PM »

Check the anti freeze,cover the exhaust pipe and air cleaner you will be ok the bugs don't grow in freezing weather and you don't want to get into the oil fogging of the engine
Logged

Live each day like it was your last,one day it will be
bobofthenorth
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2071



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2012, 06:44:53 PM »

The most important rule for storing any diesel powered machinery is "park it so you can get at the noisy end."  I've stored a lot of diesel engines over the years and all I've ever done is disconnect the batteries and walk away from them. 
Logged

R.J.(Bob) Evans
1981 Prevost 8-92, 10 spd
My website
Our weblog
Simply growing older is not the same as living.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!