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Author Topic: Building a bus garage/shop  (Read 6409 times)
robertglines1
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« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2012, 02:58:16 PM »

Not OSHA correct  but I have a shallow pit that I have a cover for. Just 4 ft deep and 8 ft long . So if you need under front of bus you need to swap ends. Nice elect and air in it. Have never had a water problem as I left bottom bare with rock and then put wood planks to smooth bottom of pit.  Any spilled or runaway water just soaks in. Could pump if it had to be.  25yrs never have. Like some other we have other things that share shop that are on steel so part of shop(most of)is rock floor.  Running water so you can wash parts or bus(out of sun).  Sewer hook up stubbed out for future hook up from bus if your pouring floor. Never know when you come in with tank full and need to empty into burried tank outside building(future project). Or you need to move into bus.  RV hook up electrical box to plug coach into when in barn and one outside for visitors.   Just a few ideas.  Hope I understood your question correctly.   Bob
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Timkar
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« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2012, 03:09:04 PM »

Just finished siding mine this past summer. 40 x 60 with 16' walls. One 14H x 12W door for the bus  and two 12'H x 10' doors (one on each end)
Finally got mezzanine done over workshop side and as usual it is full...next one may have to be bigger.... Wink Wink Wink
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« Reply #17 on: December 07, 2012, 04:55:27 PM »

My "bus barn" is a frame building around 40' by 50' with a 14' by 12' door.  You want a decent amount of elbow room.  Pour a thick floor where you plan to actually part the bus, so it can support jacks.

Brian
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wg4t50
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« Reply #18 on: December 07, 2012, 05:25:13 PM »

Luvrbus, If that was ment for Dave, my building is a metal, prefab type,  have forgotten the name of it, but it is plenty strong for our snow load etc. Love the 14 X 14 door, sometimes they are too narrow, haw..
As usual, the only mistake, should have made it 60 X 100 and certainly that would be too small too, I seem to have the ability to collect useful  junk.   Grin
And yes, would do it again, only bigger.  Still have parts for the MCI7, like block off plates for rear bags, brake foot valve-new, etc, etc...
Dave
« Last Edit: December 07, 2012, 05:28:52 PM by wg4t50 » Logged

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chessie4905
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« Reply #19 on: December 07, 2012, 05:35:59 PM »

Mines 48x 60x 15 ceiling. 38 foot full depth pit, two 12x12 doors, super insulated, waste oil furnace, full bathroom with shower. Only change would be to have 13 or 14 tall doors instead. Coach roof airs only clear by about 1 inch at normal ride height.
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David Anderson
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« Reply #20 on: December 07, 2012, 07:23:54 PM »

Okay I'll post it in the "bus projects" section.  It won't get buried in the threads there.  This will be 100% DIY by me except the concrete pour.  I am doing the form work, however.  It will be a bolt up Mueller building 40x50x15 with a 13'T x 12'W rollup door. 

David
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buswarrior
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« Reply #21 on: December 07, 2012, 08:26:23 PM »

My advice would be to make the door tall enough for all legal max height vehicles.

You, or your estate, take yourselves out of a chunk of the potential market if a condo sleeper semi tractor can't get in the door.

Ask any real estate salesperson, a big garage hurts your available market, you don't want to cut it even further.

And, you never know what vehicles or roof mounted equipment you might get into in the future and curse yourself for not spending the couple of bucks now to go tall enough.

And, yes, your accumulated treasures ALWAYS expand to fill the available space.

happy coaching!
buswarrior

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luvrbus
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« Reply #22 on: December 07, 2012, 08:29:29 PM »

David just remember the roof goes on last on a pre/fab metal building I had to help a friend in Quartzsite take his roof off he was looking for shade early in the process.

Rent you a small electric hyd scissor lift you can put the whole building up with one in 2 weeks by yourself BTDT
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wg4t50
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« Reply #23 on: December 08, 2012, 01:46:00 AM »

The reason I used the 14' X 14' door, so later you never know what you will need to get in the door, trucks are 13'6" generally and some stuff is more than 8' wide.  Just saying
Dave
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sledhead
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« Reply #24 on: December 08, 2012, 07:14:32 AM »

If your winters are cold and you plan to heat it size does matter . I have r 24 in the walls r 20 under the heated floor r 50 in the ceiling . I heat with propane hi efficient boiler and if the sun were to ever shine in the winter I have 22,000 btu solar  panels ( water ) which will heat the garage . The average propane bill is about $1000.00 per year. Wow! That's like a tank and a 1/4 of bus fuel or 1600 mile trip .              dave
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« Reply #25 on: December 08, 2012, 07:38:03 AM »

Here in AZ I installed the 14 ft doors on each end for air movement and drive through in your part of Texas you are probably going to need that air movement too David is your building going to have skylights I have 6.

Redoing the restaurants in Phoenix I found something that will move some air and a lot of it and that is the vent fans off the hoods I have a extra one if you decide to install one, the vents from the building suppliers are about useless so don't waste your money on those
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« Reply #26 on: December 08, 2012, 08:07:41 AM »

You want to give serious consideration to adding a pit to your shop.  I built a 40 x 60 shop and the pit was one of the best parts about it.  It was relatively inexpensive (about $2k as I recall).

If you do it, be sure to plumb in advance for a sump, air, and power.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #27 on: December 08, 2012, 08:22:12 AM »

You don't even want to go there David with the pit deal there is reason for no pits now only a shallow pit is allowed nothing over 2 foot for front end work in new construction you are a business man check the pit falls lol you will run from it

 I would say even if the locals allow a pit you would be in the $15,000 range for 4x4x8 pit to comply with the safety standards of today

good luck
« Last Edit: December 08, 2012, 09:22:17 AM by luvrbus » Logged

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Sam 4106
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« Reply #28 on: December 08, 2012, 11:55:51 AM »

I love my 44" wide X 5' deep X 20' long pit. I didn't seek a permit, nor does it comply with the requirements of a commercial pit. But is very nice to have. I keep it covered with a combination of 3/8" aluminum deck plate and 3/4" plywood when the bus isn't over it so no one can fall into it. The cost was for the form plywood, rebar, and concrete. The walls are 6" thick surrounded by a 6" concrete floor with the wall rebar extending into the floor. I did all the labor myself including the digging, rebar, forming and pouring the concrete. I don't know what the requirements would be in David's area, if a permit is even required, but when I built my pit 15 years ago there were no building codes in our rural area, although I did need a building permit for the garage. Just my way. Your method may be different,

Good luck, Sam
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« Reply #29 on: December 08, 2012, 12:20:52 PM »

Lol his bus doesn't set on the jello bags a creeper he can roll about any place he wants and besides 5 ft deep David being small in stature he would need a step ladder 

I had a pit so you guys tell me what can be done from a pit besides light duty maintenance I can tell you not much on a Eagle 


good luck
« Last Edit: December 08, 2012, 12:29:15 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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