Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
July 29, 2014, 03:58:03 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an E-Mag Subscription: It arrives at least two weeks before the First Class printed magazine.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Building a bus garage/shop  (Read 5407 times)
sledhead
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 339





Ignore
« Reply #45 on: December 10, 2012, 05:32:20 AM »

I use my pit for maintance on bus,to oil spray,change the oil,filters on our other cars and trucks.It just gives you a lot more room under the vehicles for maintance.Unlike a creeper where you are claustrophobic under a vehicle.                  dave
Logged

1990 mci 102c  6v92 ta ht740  kit,living room slide . home base huntsville ontario canada
buswarrior
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3571


'75 MC8 8V71 HT740




Ignore
« Reply #46 on: December 10, 2012, 07:30:49 AM »

Whichever strategy a busnut follows, the easier something is to do, the more likely we will do it.

The problem with the human default capacity for energy conservation might be...

The harder it is to gain access to the slack adjusters, the less likely they will be checked as often?

A pit, though heavy with negatives, makes accessing the underside quick, easy, and relatively less physical as we age.

Used to just dive under stuff, now, there's a pause... it isn't as easy as it used to be, and now there's a 2 day recovery of strained muscles and barked skin to heal over. Don't remember it being like that before...

Of course a set of those wheel snatching hoists would be lovely, but spendy.

One variation on a pit that a busnut shared some time ago was building the pit into a drop-off, created by the end of the fill for the driveway, as I recall. Old railway ties or other landscaping techniques may be employed, as it was open at one end over the edge. Also, all the dangers of accumulated fumes/gases are gone, as they can waft away.

Nose or tail would be accommodated by turning the coach around.

Claim it is the stairs to the lower level and you are done?

happy coaching!
buswarrior





Logged

Frozen North, Greater Toronto Area
wg4t50
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 759





Ignore
« Reply #47 on: December 10, 2012, 09:14:53 AM »

BW,
My first setup consisted of two welded ramps, 22"wide X 10" high with a ramp of 3.5' and the top was 15" length.  Used that setup for everything except when did the rear end, used a pit at a charter bus operator garage, they run about 25 MCI bus's and on a Saturday I had access to the pit and forklift for lifting out of the pit along with a wheeled hydraulic jack in the pit to bolt the 3rd member to, so in the end was a rather simple deal on the rear, new bearings, and gears, shaft, thrust washers and pinion seal, kept the origional ring & pinion, all else was new.  Never had any issue after that, very quiet and smooth.  Used the ramps for front end, rear work, greasing brake adjustment, etc..
Yes, as we age, things take a bit longer to address for sure, now why I use an employee, I'm just too old, feeble and fat I guess.
Dave M
Logged

MCI7 20+ Yrs
Foretravel w/ISM500
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12097




Ignore
« Reply #48 on: December 10, 2012, 09:38:12 AM »

It's a done deal anyway the town David lives in required a engineered set of plans sign by as registered civil or structural engineer as most do for the permit and he made no mention of a pit 

If you have access a drive through building is the only way to go this is the first one for me and like Geoff I love it
« Last Edit: December 10, 2012, 09:51:43 AM by luvrbus » Logged

Live each day like it was your last,one day it will be
Bob Gilbert
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 27




Ignore
« Reply #49 on: December 10, 2012, 12:52:46 PM »

http://i573.photobucket.com/albums/ss179/oscarcurleypriss/101-1.jpg

trying to post a pic for the first time
Logged
Bob Gilbert
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 27




Ignore
« Reply #50 on: December 10, 2012, 12:57:32 PM »

Well Ill be, it worked.
This is my new bus barn and future home. It is 50x50 with a 50x18 living area across the front. Yes it has cracks, built on Okla clay lol
Logged
Busnut83
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 179




Ignore
« Reply #51 on: December 10, 2012, 01:34:34 PM »

Good Idea???  I am about to start building?Huh Need ideas
Logged
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12097




Ignore
« Reply #52 on: December 10, 2012, 01:58:01 PM »

Looking good Bob red clay on rock what else could be better tell Sandy hi for us and give me a call if you guys come through Phoenix I know a place where we can eat free (so to speak) lol

good luck
Logged

Live each day like it was your last,one day it will be
Dave5Cs
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1460


1979 MCI MC5Cs 6V-71 HT-740 Allison, Roseville, CA




Ignore
« Reply #53 on: December 10, 2012, 02:28:29 PM »

Costco

Dave5Cs from Galaxy S III
Logged

David Anderson
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 836


South Texas in the Eagle Ford Shale area




Ignore
« Reply #54 on: December 10, 2012, 05:18:46 PM »

Well Ill be, it worked.
This is my new bus barn and future home. It is 50x50 with a 50x18 living area across the front. Yes it has cracks, built on Okla clay lol
Very nice Bob,  I saw a lot of buildings with the wainscot walls of different color in Missouri.  It's very popular there.  Don't see it much in Texas, but I think it looks great.  My building will be so hidden from the street when done, I decided not to do mine that way.  It saves me a few $$.

I thought about doing a wood frame building like yours, but I was getting so much grief from the city about engineering, I gave up and said, "Mueller".  Their blood pressure then dropped to normal.  

Did you use regular flanged type windows that can be bought and any orange box store?  I'm leaning that way because they are 1/2 the price of steel building windows.  As long as I get the drip trims installed correctly it looks like regular windows will work fine.  The trim reveal on your windows looks extra large and doesn't look like a regular J trim piece around each window.

David
« Last Edit: December 10, 2012, 05:26:16 PM by David Anderson » Logged
junkman42
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 450





Ignore
« Reply #55 on: December 11, 2012, 04:10:22 AM »

David, I have a Morton built building with the wainscot.  The biggest advantage besides looks is when Your wife trys to drive through the wall with a kubota RTV.  Should I mention what pallet forks on a tractor does to the overall appearance.  The wainscot makes repair easy.  Morton is used to My begging for factory panels LOL!  Just My take on things.  John L
Logged
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12097




Ignore
« Reply #56 on: December 11, 2012, 05:23:08 AM »

Any self flashing window will work on a steel building David and any good window shop can order those for you, the framing for metal buildings (headers) get expensive did your kit come with those and don't forget to pre treat the concrete slab for termites those little guys work wonders in concrete lol
Logged

Live each day like it was your last,one day it will be
Ed Hackenbruch
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2361




Ignore
« Reply #57 on: December 11, 2012, 05:46:01 AM »

My brother bought a place that has a steel quonset (sp?) hut type of shop. Must be about 45ft long as we had a couple of feet of room in front of my 5A and enough room behind it to work on it when we fixed my broken radius arm pin a year or two ago.  No roof rafters to contend with and less wasted space to heat......although since it is in Yuma heating is not really much of an issue! Grin
Logged

1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
Bob Gilbert
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 27




Ignore
« Reply #58 on: December 11, 2012, 07:28:10 AM »

David, my building was built by Amish from around Chouteau, Okla. it was a turn key including windows doors slab etc. I  did the electrical and built the living quarters. The windows also were built in that area by Amish, vinyl tilt in and insulated.

Clifford, we are planning on wintering around Brownsville this year but if we change are minds I will call you.

Bob
Logged
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12097




Ignore
« Reply #59 on: December 11, 2012, 07:49:42 AM »

Bob, did Miller build your building ?
Logged

Live each day like it was your last,one day it will be
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!