Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
October 25, 2014, 12:57:58 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: By clicking on any ad, a hotlink takes you directly to the advertiser’s website.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 [2] 3  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Fixin to make someone's job miserable...  (Read 4420 times)
brojcol
Jimmy
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 459




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2006, 09:06:44 AM »

Hooray for BIG Government!  If we keep voting for communists, we are going to end up being communists.  Some dictionary definitions are in order:

Communist-Supporting, advocating, or serving to further communism.

Communism-a theory or system of social organization based on the holding of all property in common, actual ownership being ascribed to the community as a whole or to the state.  A system of government in which the state plans and controls the economy and a single, often authoritarian party holds power, claiming to make progress toward a higher social order in which all goods are equally shared by the people.

As a nation, we are slouching toward oblivion due to people considering it their right "NOT" to be offended by what you say, what you build, what you wear, what you eat and yes my friends, what you THINK!

Of course, you can't beat the communists.  You have to learn to play their games...

Jimmy
Logged

"Ask yourself this question...Are you funky enough to be a globetrotter?  Well are you???  ARE YOU?!?!

deal with it."            Professor Bubblegum Tate
belfert
Guest

« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2006, 09:11:08 AM »

I live about 30 miles from Craig in another suburb of the same metro area.  The area I am in is less than 5 miles from St. Paul, MN.  The area used to be a popular weekend/summer getaway for St Paul and Minneapolis residents in the early 1900s.

Anyhow, I bought a dilipidated house that used to be a cabin built in 1911.  The house was terribly neglected by previous owner and needed a complete renovation.  I brought in a contractor to bid on renovation and he said to tear it down as soon as he saw the place.  He said it would cost $200k to renovate.  It cost me $190k to tear down and build a new house almost double the size with attached garage.

Well, one of my neighbors called the city to complain about a new house being built next door.  (I think this was even before the old one was demolished!)  She complained even though I had yet to even apply to the city to build a new house!  The city basically told her to go away since nothing had been submitted yet.

The point is the neighbor went straight to the city and never even tried to talk to me!

I was around just about every day doing work of some kind though I wasn't living there yet.  She never said anything to the city after I submitted my plans.  My $325,000 house probably raised the value of her shack by $20k or more.  (Her house is almost as bad as the one I demolished.)

As far as I know, nobody has complained about my bus, but is is a licensed RV parked legally.  It is over 150 feet from the street behind my house so you have to look for it to see it.

Brian Elfert
Logged
kyle4501
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3145


PD4501 South Carolina




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2006, 09:52:43 AM »

Don't wrestle with a pig. You can't win & the pig enjoys it.
Don't argue with a pig, it annoys the pig & wastes your time.

Take a deep breath & think, think, think.
Be proactive. Do not give others power over you by simply reacting.
What can you do that is productive for your goals?

You could sue to identify the complainer based on harasment, but at what cost?

Cliff said it best - get to know the code enforcement officials & get their input. My experience has ALWAYS been that once they know your side of the story, things change for the better (unless you just want to argue, then see above). In my case, I found that they did not like the habitual complainers. After hearing that I wanted to 'be a good neighbor' they defended me to the complainer & told them to contact me directly before complaining to the city again. That was the end of the complaints! (I have been told that some realators will do this to affect property values or entice someone to sell.)

If you move out to the country, pick a crappy area, otherwise some developer will come in & this crap will start all over again.  Angry

My personal thought is to plant evergreens as a privacy screen. It makes my place look nicer & the nosey-nellies go elsewhere.  Grin
Logged

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. (R.M. Nixon)
DavidInWilmNC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 594


1978 MC-8 as I bought it May 2005




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: November 16, 2006, 11:07:24 AM »

I had the same problem as Craig, except my next-door neighbors were the ones complaining.  These are the same neighbors that had, until this point, been good friends of ours.  My bus is/was parked in the back yard as far from the street as it can be.  After dragging the complaints out with the Code Enforcemt officer (who calls herself 'officer' on the phone and on voicemail), I finally met with her supervisor.  At the time, I owned two separately deeded lots - one with my house and one that's vacant.  It looks like one big lot, but it wasn't.  The supervisor told me the violation was having an RV on a lot without a primary residence - a technicality.  He even admitted that the 'spirit' and intent of the code was to prevent people from buying lots and storing vehicles, not to prevent adjacent property owners from keeping their vehicles.  I was told I couldn't even park a car on that lot.  I had to combine the two lots together.  The lot that I had paid cash for is now combined with my hosuse and mortgage.  The City tells me I 'may' be able to split the lots at some point... at my cost.  Of course, I could appeal this, but at $500 up-front with no guarantee of anything, I didn't.

I was also told that this was complaint-driven, selective enforcement.  Basically, a minority home owner can be harassed by neighbors making complaints to the City.  The City issues a violation notification without actually investigating the situation.  The person I was dealing with couldn't even tell me WHY I was violating a code or HOW to remedy it.  I started getting $100 citations, of which I paid one.  A call to the asst. city manager stopped those, as I was trying to comply.  As I drive to work, I see boats in driveways, RV's beside houses, trash cans in front of houses... all violations.  The Code Enforcement folks see those all day long, but don't do anything (who'd want to make their own job harder?). 

I was going to make complaints about EVERY violation I saw EVERY day.  The only thing that stopped me is that the City re-assigned the officers and I didn't know what section she was covering.  It wouldn't be to get even, just to keep her busy and tie her up enough so she wouldn't harass me.  Selective/ complaint-driven enforcement is a lame solution to not having enough officers to actually handle the violations, to having an appropriate appeal system, or to having realistic codes.

David
Logged
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1894


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2006, 11:16:26 AM »


My personal thought is to plant evergreens as a privacy screen. It makes my place look nicer & the nosey-nellies go elsewhere.  Grin

In the UK the government have quite recently passed a law which effectively makes it illegal to plant Leylandii conifers (the really fast growing ones). I think the rule is that no hedge should be over 2 metres in height, but the way the law is always reported in the media is that it is specifically intended to target Leylandii, which can grow to the height of a house in not many years (thus making neighbours' gardens very dark and oppressive etc). The is even an organisation here called 'Hedgeline' who you can call up to complain about the height of your neighbour's hedge.

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
gumpy
Some Assembly Required
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3268


Slightly modified 1982 MC9


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #20 on: November 16, 2006, 11:34:31 AM »

You could sue to identify the complainer based on harasment, but at what cost?

Yeah, but with the state law on their side, I'm not sure I'll ever be able to find out. And quite frankly, I don't really care who it is. It wouldn't do me any good to know. There's only a handful of people in the neighborhood that I know and care about, and I'm pretty sure they are not the ones complaining since they all have similar violations and several of them borrow my stuff from time to time.

Quote
Cliff said it best - get to know the code enforcement officials & get their input. My experience has ALWAYS been that once they know your side of the story, things change for the better

And in her defense, she has been quite civil when I've talked to her on the phone, but I'm getting the impression she's tired of taking these complaints, and is starting to put the blame on me, rather than the person doing the harassing. She pretty much told me if I was in compliance to the codes there wouldn't be anything to complain about. Then we discussed the fine line between being in compliance and being out of compliance when it comes to things like landscaping materials and equipment being used or stored, and how the codes don't make the distinction between the two.

Quote
(I have been told that some realators will do this to affect property values or entice someone to sell.)

Interesting you brought that up, because I was convinced the first call, which was about the bus, was generated by a woman across the street and down a couple houses who had listed her house for sale for about $20K more than the market value, and it had sat on the market for about 9 months without any showings. But, I don't have any proof of that.

Quote
If you move out to the country, pick a crappy area, otherwise some developer will come in & this crap will start all over again.  Angry

I was the first one to move onto this street when they were developing the neighborhood. Everyone else came after me. I'd like to tell them if they don't like it, they shouldn't have moved there in the first place.

Quote
My personal thought is to plant evergreens as a privacy screen. It makes my place look nicer & the nosey-nellies go elsewhere.  Grin

Yeah, I was considering that. If I could find something that would quickly grow high enough to cover the backhoe, it wouldn't be a problem, other than I'd have to figure out how to cover the entrance area. Their definition of screening does indicate plants and topographic features can be used. Thought about building a 4-5 foot mound, and putting a 6 foot fence on top of it :-) .



Logged

Craig Shepard
Located in Minnesquito

http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
bobofthenorth
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2092



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #21 on: November 16, 2006, 11:52:22 AM »

FWIW my pa taught me to never get in a p'ing match with a skunk.

And never to argue with fools - they'll just wear you down and eventually beat you with experience.

Logged

R.J.(Bob) Evans
1981 Prevost 8-92, 10 spd
My website
Our weblog
Simply growing older is not the same as living.
belfert
Guest

« Reply #22 on: November 16, 2006, 11:57:52 AM »

I was going to make complaints about EVERY violation I saw EVERY day.  The only thing that stopped me is that the City re-assigned the officers and I didn't know what section she was covering.  It wouldn't be to get even, just to keep her busy and tie her up enough so she wouldn't harass me.  Selective/ complaint-driven enforcement is a lame solution to not having enough officers to actually handle the violations, to having an appropriate appeal system, or to having realistic codes.

Do you really want to pay the extra taxes to have enough compliance officers to ticket every offense?  Revenue from fines would pay for the new officers for a while, but most folks would comply and fine revenue would go back down.

Maybe codes would change if strictly enforced.  I don't know.

Brian Elfert
Logged
DavidInWilmNC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 594


1978 MC-8 as I bought it May 2005




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: November 16, 2006, 01:17:51 PM »


Maybe codes would change if strictly enforced.  I don't know.

Brian Elfert

That's what I would hope would happen.  Maybe the 25 foot boats on trailers and commercial trucks parked on residential streets would be a good place to start.  Those are safety concerns as well as 'code' issues.  It just seems that complaint-based enforcement isn't the way to go.  I was intending to only make complaints in the area where this particular code officer worked. 

David
« Last Edit: November 16, 2006, 01:22:22 PM by DavidInWilmNC » Logged
gumpy
Some Assembly Required
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3268


Slightly modified 1982 MC9


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #24 on: November 16, 2006, 01:21:08 PM »

If mine was a safety concern, I wound't have a problem with it.
Logged

Craig Shepard
Located in Minnesquito

http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
belfert
Guest

« Reply #25 on: November 16, 2006, 01:52:32 PM »

Why are commercial trucks on the street any more of a safety concern than a bus or an RV?

I personally can't stand older neighborhoods that have cars parked down the road so that two vehicles can't even pass on the road.  This is a much bigger issue than a stack of building material, but no older city would dare ban on street parking as the complaints to city hall would probably overwhelm the phone system and the staff!
Logged
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1894


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #26 on: November 16, 2006, 02:46:20 PM »


I personally can't stand older neighborhoods that have cars parked down the road so that two vehicles can't even pass on the road. 


I live on a fairly narrow street, and one of my 'neighbours' is a school. Parking during the day related to school visitors and parents dropping off kids makes the road frequently impassable altogether, or at best not wide enough for two cars to get past each other.

Parked cars frequently block the driveway to my house and my neighbour's houses, leading to lots of aggravation as you can imagine. The school is run by the local council, and they are also responsible for parking issues. I have written to the council complaining about the unacceptable parking situation, but they basically have just given me a non-commital 'we'll monitor the situation' type reply.

The point of me describing all this is to agree with the earlier 'safety concern' comments. If the school on my street caught fire, or there was a serious accident of some sort, there is NO WAY an ambulance or fire engine would be able to reach the school. I have described this scenario to the council, but they are not interested. What I plan to do is to get the local media, emergency services, parents groups etc involved with this major 'danger to innocent children' type issue, and force the council to take notice. Problem is, like everyone else, I am busy earning a living and everything else, and will probably never get around to doing it.

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
akbusguy2000
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 172





Ignore
« Reply #27 on: November 16, 2006, 02:59:00 PM »

And then there's poetic justice:

I have a school teacher friend who bought a new home in one of those "excusive" new modern subdivisions on the hillside outside Anchorage a number of years ago.  But his lot was on the steep uphill side of the street - the back yard went up at an angle making it just about useless, but it was densely covered with 60 ft spruce trees.  His driveway was short, double wide, but also steep.  He kept his 18 ft travel trailer parked in front of the garage.  The covenants specifiec that such things had to be parked in back of the house, and the neighbors complalined incessantly.  They eventualy got a restraining order which specified the trailer had to be removed from in front of the house.  He refused to comply, ended up in court and was ordered to pay monthly damages to the homeowners association until it was removed.

He paid the damages over the winter, but in the spring did some backyard tree topping, hired a guy with a cherry picker, and had his travel trailer placed on top of the trees at about 45 ft above the ground.  The homeowners association took him back to court on some trumped up nuisance charges, which were dismissed.  So by the time school let out and he wanted to use his trailer to go fishing, the homeowners association had produced a set of amended covenants and a resolution to refund the damages.

The following year he sold the house and moved.

tg

  
Logged
DavidInWilmNC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 594


1978 MC-8 as I bought it May 2005




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: November 16, 2006, 03:22:57 PM »

Why are commercial trucks on the street any more of a safety concern than a bus or an RV?

Re-read my post.  I'm talking about commercial trucks parked on the street vs my bus in my back yard.  I've had kids and pets run out in front of me from the far side of a parked truck.  Luckily, I'm always paranoid about that and go around them slowly.  I live in an old neighborhood (1912) and lots of people park on the street.  Many houses here in old neighborhoods don't have driveways or even curb cuts.  Some of the lots in our historic district are 33' wide... nowhere to park but on the street.
Logged
belfert
Guest

« Reply #29 on: November 16, 2006, 03:46:59 PM »

Why are commercial trucks on the street any more of a safety concern than a bus or an RV?

Re-read my post.  I'm talking about commercial trucks parked on the street vs my bus in my back yard.  I've had kids and pets run out in front of me from the far side of a parked truck.  Luckily, I'm always paranoid about that and go around them slowly.  I live in an old neighborhood (1912) and lots of people park on the street.  Many houses here in old neighborhoods don't have driveways or even curb cuts.  Some of the lots in our historic district are 33' wide... nowhere to park but on the street.

I never said you parked your bus on the street.

There are ways for cities that want to spend the money to help with on street parking.  I have seen streets built wider with parallel parking stalls built along the sides.  There are curbs built out into the street every so often so the wider road doesn't become a haven for speeders.  They also build around old trees on the boulevard and use those to also divide the parking stalls.  There is almost always a public easement that can be used to widen a street.

Brian Elfert
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!