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Author Topic: 4106 Air bag repacement  (Read 1167 times)
BUS COMMANDER
PD4106-2699
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« on: February 02, 2013, 08:43:34 AM »

Having to change a blown rear air bag. I have never performed a repair  as this, any advice out there for the correct way to block up the bus etc? Im mechanically inclined but the size and weight seem to be a little intimidating. Any advice or photos will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
« Last Edit: February 02, 2013, 08:45:07 AM by BUS COMMANDER » Logged

Wes Jackson
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« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2013, 10:11:52 AM »

I have lots of pictures and will try to write a quick "How To" later tonight. 
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OneLapper
1964 PD4106-2853
www.markdavia.com
BUS COMMANDER
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« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2013, 10:45:21 AM »

Than you very much.
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Wes Jackson
RJ
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« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2013, 11:02:50 AM »

Name??? -

Please help us help you!  Take a few minutes to edit your profile to include a signature line - similar to mine below - that includes at least your first name, home base city/state, and make/model of your coach.

By doing so, we can better refer you to parts sources, repair facilities and, as an added bonus, often a neighboring busnut! 

What is the VIN on your coach?  PD4106-XXXX?

Do you have the maintenance manual & it's supplement?  There's a wealth of information in both, including air bag replacement procedures.  The parts book also has a bunch of exploded drawings to help you, too.  And an Operator's Manual will often answer "what is this for?"  All four should be in your library, five if you include a DD 8V71 manual.

If you don't have it already, memorize this number: 1-888-262-2434.  That's Luke @ US Coach in NJ.  He's probably forgotten more about GMC buses than all the combined knowledge on the major bus bulletin boards.  Strong supporter of our crazy hobby, knows the correct parts for the applications, reasonable prices and ships same day when you use plastic money.  Support those who support us!

Working on a 4106 is not much worse than working on a GM car, only bigger.

Crib blocking of the coach body is much safer than using jack stands.  Block on the main bulkheads on either side of the axles.  A 20-ton air over hydraulic jack is extremely helpful.

Check the leveling valves also - you may have a bad one, not a bad air bellow.

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink
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RJ Long
PD4106-2784 No More
Fresno CA
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« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2013, 09:01:56 PM »

I have lots of pictures and will try to write a quick "How To" later tonight. 

Ok,  the Webasto test didn't go to plan so I didn't have time to post a how to tonight.

Ill try for the morning!
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OneLapper
1964 PD4106-2853
www.markdavia.com
Sam 4106
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« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2013, 06:24:32 AM »

RJ is right of course that it my not be the air bellows. It could also be a rusted can inside the air bellows. I had that on our 4106 twice and on the Prevost I had once. What are commonly called "leveling valves" are really height control valves, although the parts person will know what you are talking about either way. Your parts manual will refer to them as height control valves. That may save you some time looking for them.

Good luck, Sam
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1976 MCI-8TA with 8V92 DDEC II and Allison HT740
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« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2013, 09:31:43 AM »

Changing the air bag is not hard, but takes a little time since there are a bunch of bolts.  The biggest issue is jacking and blocking the bus to it is safe to be under it.  When that is done, let the air out of the suspension so the bags hang fully extended.  You will then have lots of room to remove and replace them.  Are your bags plated?  If so, they take a longer bolt.  Luke recommends using all new bolts.  They have special heads, so don't try any hardware store stuff.  I have found the bicycle tire tools work well to remove and replace the air bag ring.

Anyway, make sure that you have the problem diagnosed correctly before removing the bags.  See if air is leaking from somewhere else.  Since you describe the bag as blown, it would seem you know where the hole is.
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Sam 4106
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« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2013, 04:18:53 PM »

Lin, air bellows do not mount the same on a 4106 as they do on an MCI. No special bolts are needed nor are any block off plates, since GM 4106's don't have air beams. They have rolling lobe type air bellows. Just an FYI.

Good luck, Sam
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1976 MCI-8TA with 8V92 DDEC II and Allison HT740
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« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2013, 08:13:05 PM »

How archaic, LOL do you blow them up with a hand pump or is there a compressor on the GM's

Dave5Cs
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RJ
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« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2013, 09:05:42 PM »

Yup, Dave, very archaic.

So archaic that both MCI and Prevost now use rolling lobe air bellows.

 Grin
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RJ Long
PD4106-2784 No More
Fresno CA
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« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2013, 09:42:56 PM »

Sam, Thanks for the correction. 
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BUS COMMANDER
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« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2013, 09:54:49 AM »

I confirmed it was an airbag leaking. Luke at US Coach fixed me up with the parts. Luke sure makes it easy to do business and a really helpful person.
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Wes Jackson
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