Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
October 23, 2014, 01:16:13 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If your computer is lost, damaged, or stolen, your Online mags will be safe.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: wheel bearings  (Read 921 times)
David Anderson
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 844


South Texas in the Eagle Ford Shale area




Ignore
« on: November 20, 2006, 02:00:18 PM »

I pulled the plugs off my front wheels and bogies to check the oil.  It looks a bit black and could use a change.  No sign of any leaking anywhere.  How do you empty the oil and clean things out?  I looked in the manual and it appears the hub cap must be removed by unscrewing all the bolts.  If so, when replacing do I need to buy all new gaskets?  Anything else needed?  Best way to keep from making a mess?

The book specifies HGO 85w90 for temps between 10F and -15F.  There is no spec for temps above 10F.  Should it be 140w? 

I humbly ask for guidance from those who have BTDT.

David Anderson
1985 Eagle 10
Logged
busnut104
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 211




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2006, 03:27:49 PM »

Dave: When you remove the cap it still is hard to get all the oil out with out removing the wheel, And if you remove the wheel you may have to replacethe wheel seal, I have removed the wheel and was able to reuse the seal, but you must be careful. Also you can get by with permitex of a forma gasket material, I think if the oil is that dirty and you are going to change it I would remove the wheel and inspect the bearings and brakes, buy a new wheel seal and gasket, Refill with 80-90 weight, and some time I add just a shot of stp. Should be good for many years.s
Logged
Tom Y
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 881


80 5C With Cummins L10 in Progress




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2006, 03:52:17 PM »

David, Mine had a plug to drain the oil.  Just turn it down, and use something to get the oil away from your tire. I put some fuel in mine and spun it around then drained it out.  Tom Y 
Logged

Tom Yaegle
Ross
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 406


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2006, 06:41:09 PM »

On an MCI you just crack the cap loose.  Also, MCI specs SAE 30 motor oil for the wheel bearings.

Ross
Logged
John E. Smith
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 73





Ignore
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2006, 08:26:38 PM »

These are all good suggestions, but sort of incomplete...

Yes, oil will drain when you remove the side-plug or take the oiler off.  However, the internal design of the hub prevents 2/3 of the oil in the hub from escaping.  In the center of the hub, between the bearings, the hub has a "well" that is machined a bit wider than the bearing race areas.  The principle is that the bearings will be provided with oil even if the front oiler is cracked or leaking.

The only way to completely drain the lube oil from the hub is to remove the hub.  Most times, if you are careful to not bang the lip of the seal on the end of the spindle when sliding the hub off, you can re-use the seal if it is not worn out.  Just make sure that you clean the spindle and seal land thoroughly before re-installation.  My own standard practice, though, is that if I do not know the last time a seal was installed -- I simply replace it.  After all, a new seal is less than $20 in most places.

As for lube oil -- my personal choice is 75/140 gear oil with a healthy shot of Lucas.  Of course, my boss likes to eliminate the oil completely and pack the bearings & cavity with grease.  Each has their own merits -- but most commercial busses are usually switched over to packed bearings at the first bearing change.
Logged

John E. Smith
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!