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Author Topic: What to look for in a used mci 102?  (Read 1844 times)
Jnbroadbent
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« on: February 20, 2013, 03:28:04 PM »

Hopefully checking out one tomorrow, it's had not been converted and I don't its history. Rust is an obvious... But other then that any specific problematic areas I need to really look over? I belive it has the 6v92 and the 4 speed.

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Jon
1980 Mc9 w/ veg oil
8v71
Jacksonville Fl
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« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2013, 06:15:02 PM »

I looked after the hockey team's 102D3 for several years, so have some experience. The biggest concern always was with corrosion. Even though most of the bus is built with SS steel. The problem areas were mostly electrical: the panel outside under the driver's window always had moisture in it, and it was a constant thing fixing ground connections on the bottom of it. Also the terminals in the batt. compartment: to the batt. equalizer and the batts themselves. The clearance, turn signals and head lights were a regular issue too, mostly to do with grounds, and sockets. Another area that gets a lot of moisture is the rad and inter-cooler compartment at the back above the engine. Electrical terminals and fan clutches were susceptible. Had to replace the rad once because it rotted out. All the door hinges and latches also would need regular lubrication. The Webasto wiring was also something I was into often because of corrosion. That bus was driven in the winter mostly in S.E. BC and WA state, so lots of snow and slush. Otherwise a great bus, all SS steel, and with a pre-EGR S60 and 7 speed manual Eaton/Fuller was a hot rod: go up mountain passes with the cars.

JC
« Last Edit: February 20, 2013, 06:21:05 PM by lostagain » Logged

JC
Invermere, BC
1977 MC5C, 6V92/HT740
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« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2013, 07:04:01 PM »

Oh and I remember now: look at the baggage doors locking mechanisms. The rods on the inside of the doors that are turned by the locking handles, are secured by aluminum hardware fastened to the steel doors, and it corrodes and tears off the door. I had to weld some back together. A PITA because you have to take the door off and remove the sheet metal liner to fix it.

If your bus hasn't seen too much winter, you won't see any of that.

JC
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JC
Invermere, BC
1977 MC5C, 6V92/HT740
TomC
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« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2013, 08:15:51 AM »

Get the bus with the right engine/transmission setup. I don't consider a 4spd manual workable in a 40ft bus. I realize many have them and are making them work. If you want a manual transmission, at least a 6 or 7 spd should be used-a 10spd even better. Then you have really great control over the bus at slow speeds for getting in and out of a camping site, backing up a hill, or even starting on a hill.
Personally- you quite simply can't beat the driveability of the Allison transmissions. Granted they use a bit more fuel-but just drive one after driving a manual bus, and you'll see where I'm coming from. I drove 13spd in my truck for 21 years and 1.3 million miles, and I switched the 13spd for the HT740-what a difference-wished I had it when I was driving. Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
Jnbroadbent
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« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2013, 08:20:40 AM »

I looked after the hockey team's 102D3 for several years, so have some experience. The biggest concern always was with corrosion. Even though most of the bus is built with SS steel. The problem areas were mostly electrical: the panel outside under the driver's window always had moisture in it, and it was a constant thing fixing ground connections on the bottom of it. Also the terminals in the batt. compartment: to the batt. equalizer and the batts themselves. The clearance, turn signals and head lights were a regular issue too, mostly to do with grounds, and sockets. Another area that gets a lot of moisture is the rad and inter-cooler compartment at the back above the engine. Electrical terminals and fan clutches were susceptible. Had to replace the rad once because it rotted out. All the door hinges and latches also would need regular lubrication. The Webasto wiring was also something I was into often because of corrosion. That bus was driven in the winter mostly in S.E. BC and WA state, so lots of snow and slush. Otherwise a great bus, all SS steel, and with a pre-EGR S60 and 7 speed manual Eaton/Fuller was a hot rod: go up mountain passes with the cars.

JC

Thank you! I got to do a walk around and check all the control panels. Everything looks good. They have maint records from a prevost place in Orlando and kept up maint. and logged everything. So far looking good! Didn't get to take it for a spin, we will over the weekend.
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Jon
1980 Mc9 w/ veg oil
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Jacksonville Fl
Jnbroadbent
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« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2013, 08:21:50 AM »

Get the bus with the right engine/transmission setup. I don't consider a 4spd manual workable in a 40ft bus. I realize many have them and are making them work. If you want a manual transmission, at least a 6 or 7 spd should be used-a 10spd even better. Then you have really great control over the bus at slow speeds for getting in and out of a camping site, backing up a hill, or even starting on a hill.
Personally- you quite simply can't beat the driveability of the Allison transmissions. Granted they use a bit more fuel-but just drive one after driving a manual bus, and you'll see where I'm coming from. I drove 13spd in my truck for 21 years and 1.3 million miles, and I switched the 13spd for the HT740-what a difference-wished I had it when I was driving. Good Luck, TomC

Tom, it has the allison ht740.
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Jon
1980 Mc9 w/ veg oil
8v71
Jacksonville Fl
Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
1989, MCI 102C3, 8V92T, HT740, 06' conversion FMCA# F-27317-S "Wife- 1969 Italian/German Style"
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« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2013, 04:11:59 AM »

Hi Jon,

The 6V92 will be real close in power as your 871.

Deff do an oil analysis, check for firm shifts in the HT-740,

check baggage doors for rust, check front air bag beams for rust,

road test for handeling and power and issues.

Good Luck
Nick-
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« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2013, 08:23:53 AM »

6V-92TA mechanical and Allison HT740-great combination. With 9G90 injectors you can get 350hp and 1000lb/ft torque. Enough power for what we do. It will slow down on hills, but no slower then big trucks do these days. 6V is cheaper to run and maintain then the 8V. I would get that power train. Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
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« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2013, 10:55:51 AM »

If I had of waited a couple of years to buy a bus my choice would have been a 1994 or 95 102 d with a dd 60 series,a 6 speed trans. still 40' but more updated eng,trans. Last 2 years before the 45'ers                       dave                  
« Last Edit: February 23, 2013, 11:28:10 AM by sledhead » Logged

1990 mci 102c  6v92 ta ht740  kit,living room slide . home base huntsville ontario canada
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MCI 1995 DL3, DD S60, Allison B500.




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« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2013, 11:20:15 AM »

If I had of waited a couple of years to buy a bus my choice would have bee a 1994 or 95 102 d with a dd 60 series,a 6 speed trans. still 40' but more updated eng,trans. Last 2 years before the 45'ers                       dave                 

Dave, not pickin at you, or anything. However, ours is a 95 DL3, and it is a 45er. We like it. S60 and Allison B500.
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MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
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« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2013, 11:36:14 AM »

I like the 40'er over the 45' because the provincial,state parks we like to camp in have more sites , some only allow 40' max   
    dave
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1990 mci 102c  6v92 ta ht740  kit,living room slide . home base huntsville ontario canada
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« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2013, 07:29:37 AM »

Course if you can find a D model with a Series 60 and Allison B500-that would be prime. I would pay $10,000 extra for that engine/transmission. Plus-the D model is still in production. Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
Jnbroadbent
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« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2013, 10:01:49 PM »

Hi Jon,

The 6V92 will be real close in power as your 871.

Deff do an oil analysis, check for firm shifts in the HT-740,

check baggage doors for rust, check front air bag beams for rust,

road test for handeling and power and issues.

Good Luck
Nick-

Nick,

  Finally got to start it up and really check everything out. Rather quick and I'm going back on Tuesday...

White smoke on start up all the way until we pulled out of the Parking lot 15 mins later. Wasnt too thick and smelled like fuel (rather then sweet like coolant) I didn't check oil or coolant. Next time definitely. Went around the block, didn't even get to really open it up, came back and most of the smoke had cleared. Very concerning though...

No rust in bays. Oddly though, underneath the vertical support columns in the cabin, there was rotted wood in the bays. I poked a hole and could not find any trace of water. Small areas, like 4"x4" very concentrated.

All the bags seem to be pretty dry. Otherwise almost no rust anywhere.
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Jon
1980 Mc9 w/ veg oil
8v71
Jacksonville Fl
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« Reply #13 on: March 15, 2013, 06:11:52 AM »

White smoke just could be from long periods of idle take a run for about a hour see if the black smoke appears or go back the next day and start in again after your run.

Lot of time you get white smoke in the morning from dribbling injectors overnight but it clears up in a few seconds after start up that engine may have problems take it to a dealer money spent now will be less than what it could cost down the road by far JMO

good luck
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