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Author Topic: Air Conditioning Question  (Read 1085 times)
Bob Belter
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Eagle 01 //Cummins M-11 Roadranger OD RTO1110




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« on: March 03, 2013, 08:41:32 AM »

Ahoy, BusFolks,
A question about air conditioning:
I ‘m doing a SFF   ----   ‘Short Fat Feller’. A 22’ motorhome built on a Ford E450 / 6.0 Diesel chassis as a supplement to my Eagle bus.
An air conditioning configuration which would be ideal is to install a 120v  ‘casement’ unit in the vertical position ---  that is  ---  face up, with the lower part through the floor.  (Be a great option in a bus too).  Simple ducting for the cold discharge ‘up’ is easy. No re-mounting/rotation of the compressor, but internal component mounting details can be handled OK.

 Lubrication of the compressor is the only obvious difficulty.  I don’t know the details of the compressor internals, and the lube oil behavior.  Is it entrained, or reservoir-ed?   
On this board, there are many with super knowledge and experience in this field, beginning with the leader of the board.
Question is:
Will it work, or maybe work, or probably not work, or certainly not work.
I’ll sure appreciate your input.
Enjoy   /s/   Bob
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Bob Belter
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« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2013, 02:31:13 PM »

Ahoy, BusFolks,
My question does not need an answer.  I just discovered a product which very nicely sidesteps the issue.  It is a portable 12,000 BTU 120 vac A/C which utilizes a 5” (hot air) discharge hose.  About 30”x 15”x17. 
That configuration takes all sorts of nastiness out of an A/C installation.  Strap that sucker(s) in ‘wherever’, and be in good shape.
And  ----   The price is great too, at $389.00
http://www.compactappliance.com/Edgestar-Extreme-Cool-12000-BTU-Portable-Air-Conditioner/AP12000S,default,pd.html
Enjoy   /s/   Bob
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gus
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« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2013, 04:23:30 PM »

Bob,

For future reference, I don't think the compressor on a window unit will operate face up.

Most window unit instructions admonish one to make the installation as level as possible.

However, I'm no AC expert and may be wrong on this.
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Scott Bennett
Scott & Heather MCI-9
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« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2013, 04:35:13 PM »

Bob,

Just a head's up that those portables don't always live up to their BTU ratings the way you might expect. It may work for you just fine, but do a little more internet research before you pull the trigger...
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Scott & Heather
1984 MCI9 6V92-turbo with 9 inch roof raise & conversion in progress.
http://www.scottmichaelbennett.com/p/our-bus.html
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« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2013, 11:53:23 AM »

Bob,
 
Here's something to ponder.....
 
There are two types of Spot Coolers; the inexpensive units have only ONE vent to outside to expel the hot air.  The more expensive units have TWO vents, one for hot air and one for drawing in the condenser exchange air.
 
The single vent units will use the room (bus) air conditioned air to draw over the condenser and then expel out the hot vent to outdoors.  What this effectively does is remove air from the bus, creates a negative pressure that must be replaced by outside air.  For example, if that hot vent pushes 200 cfm then the amount of outside air pushed into the bus through every leaky nook and cranny must also equal 200 cfm!  You're effectively never going to cool off the bus, but you will inefficiently cool a single "spot".  Hence, "Spot Cooler".
 
The dual vent units are perfectly fine to use.  They draw in outside air to move across the condenser, then expel that hot air outside.  No inside air is expelled outside, therefore no negative pressure inside the bus.  This units are more expensive because they have more moving parts.

We use these units in our customer's data rooms in emergencies.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2013, 12:01:11 PM by OneLapper » Logged

OneLapper
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Bob Belter
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« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2013, 01:14:39 PM »

Ahoy ,Onelaper,

Thanks for your input on this re air flow.  I'd seen that the bigger units show an inlet and outlet.  My plan is to work-around the issue by setting up a baffle system to pull in outside air for the condensor.  Pretty easy to do with the model I've identified, and with the mounting/installation configuration which I plan.  (I think  ---   since I've not had an in-person look at one).

The size of my SFF is only a nominal 120 sq ft, so 12,000 BTU will be quite plenty, perhaps too much A/C.

Enjoy   /s/   Bob
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TomC
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« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2013, 01:37:26 PM »

Another comment on one hose vs two hose on the condenser side. With the single hose, it is drawing the "cooled" air of the room over the hot condenser then through the hose to the outside. If you mount the unit half up and the hot side down, the condenser in these units are not big enough to be running in over 100 degree weather.
On a two hose unit, the condenser is larger to work with over 100 degree weather coming into the hose. You should try to get a unit that is rated to run in 120 degree weather. I don't think you'll find that with a portable unit.
Just remember-you get what you paid. I was thinking of doing the exact thing you are until I talked to Nick Badame. He said those portables just are not built as robustly as built in units. If you don't expect much more then 2-3 years of use, then OK. Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
sledhead
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« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2013, 02:45:25 PM »

I had the 2 duct 12,000 btu unit in my coach. It worked great for 3 years then it slowly lost its cool .I replaced it with a split unit 9,000 btu heat pump.Price wise it was a lot less, did work great for the 3 years.               dave   
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