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Author Topic: OH POOPIES, stud broke  (Read 2094 times)
jjrbus
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« on: November 24, 2006, 05:01:19 PM »

 I've been doing this radius rod bushing job and things have went pretty well. With enough pain pills I can still do alot. But today, well it just had to happen. Any nuts I have a hard time with I've been cutting off with a grinder, I dont need a broken stud problem! But I put the wrench on one today and snap, it broke, not rotted through, clean metal all across. It broke even with the shaft so there is nothing to get ahold of. I know I have to drill this and a stud is pretty hard drilling. But I'm thinking back to high school shop and I remember hardening metal. Is there some way to soften the stud to make drilling eaiser? It is a 3/4 in stud so there is a lot to wrk with. This is on the center shaft so it can be removed to work on.
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« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2006, 05:26:44 PM »

Jim,

You amswered your own question.

Pain Killers......Stud Broke......[no feelings in your hands makes sence....]

Sorry, just had to inlight you on that..

Nick-
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« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2006, 06:39:54 PM »

Jjr, I drilled one out on my MCI.  It was not hard and yours should drill out ok also.  They may be a good grade of stud but that does not mean hard.  Good luck.  Tom Y
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« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2006, 06:45:52 PM »

Weld a nut onto the remaining stud surface, then try to remove stud assy with a breaker bar and socket.
Good luck with your repair.
Sammy  Cool
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« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2006, 07:10:14 PM »

Before you start to drill that stud, see about getting some left handed drills to do the work with.  The stud may loosen up enough that as you are drilling the stud backs out of the hole.  If it doesn't back out on it's own, at least you won't have tightened it any further.

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« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2006, 07:16:38 PM »

I wonder if you can get enough "bite" on the stud to use something like this:

Craftsman Bolt-Out™ Damaged Bolt/Nut Remover Set

as seen on the Sears Website.  Never used it myself, but I seen ole Bob Vila hawking it and it looked pretty good.

Jimmy
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« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2006, 10:17:50 PM »

 Are you saying I'm boke cause I spent my money on pain pills Grin      I was poking around on the net and found this site. 
http://idisk.mac.com/forever4/Public/pages/studremoval.htm

I'm going to try this with a mig welder


I fixed the link so that it is clickable.
Richard
« Last Edit: November 25, 2006, 05:57:14 AM by DrivingMissLazy » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2006, 05:49:08 AM »

Jimmy,

Great Link!

http://idisk.mac.com/forever4/Public/pages/studremoval.htm

A friend showed me how to do that on an old motor we were working on.

We also used my MIG.  Just had to be a little more careful than with a TIG, but it worked fine.

As they say " A picture is worth a 1000 words"  Wink

Thanks

Cliff
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« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2006, 06:37:29 AM »

I've seen this done with a stick - my guess is more of us have access to a buzz box than to a TIG.  The combination of heat followed by the impact is the ticket.

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« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2006, 06:59:58 AM »

Great link using a washer.

Never done that but I have used a torch, hammer, welded a nut, vise grips and about anything else. It just takes lots of patience and persistance.

Hopefully I will never have to go through that on our Eagle, LOL.

Paul

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jjrbus
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« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2006, 04:36:39 AM »

 I tried this process with a mig welder. I was unable to get penetration on the stud. I'm  not the best welder and I cannot see the puddle like  did 20 years ago. I can see where this would work well with a TIG.
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« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2006, 07:03:52 PM »

When you run into a stud that seems very tight it is simple to heat it and run a little bees wax on it the bees wax will soak into the threads and it will come out. I have used this on several different studs and it works good. A small propane toarch is all you need.
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« Reply #12 on: November 28, 2006, 06:34:54 AM »

Weld a nut onto the remaining stud surface, then try to remove stud assy with a breaker bar and socket.
Good luck with your repair.
Sammy  Cool

My suggestion exactly! I use a nut that has a hole as large as the stud and fill the center. Then while it is still warm from welding, I put a wrench or socket on it and back it out. Just my 2 cents worth. BK  Grin
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« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2006, 07:08:57 AM »

I vote for the large washer welded first and then a nut to the washer. Especially if the stud is broken off with little or no threads remaining. It would be easier to get a good weld thru the thickness of the washer as opposed to the thickness of a nut.
Richard

Weld a nut onto the remaining stud surface, then try to remove stud assy with a breaker bar and socket.
Good luck with your repair.
Sammy  Cool

My suggestion exactly! I use a nut that has a hole as large as the stud and fill the center. Then while it is still warm from welding, I put a wrench or socket on it and back it out. Just my 2 cents worth. BK  Grin
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« Reply #14 on: November 28, 2006, 03:26:33 PM »

Weld a nut to it, then right when you are done welding start cooling it down with penetrating oil ( USE CAUTION IT MAY FLAME UP)  then when it is no longer red start to work it back and forth, this works I have hundreds of times.
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