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Author Topic: Put this in your bus!!  (Read 1124 times)
Emcemv
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1973 MCI MC-7 Combo


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« on: May 15, 2013, 05:43:08 PM »

I was at a trade show in Houston last week and saw this.  5000HP @900 RPM.  We would need Clifford to figure out the gearing for this one!!! Shocked
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Bruce & Nancy Fagley
1973 MCI MC-7 Combo Freighter
450HP DD 8V-92T 2000 Reman
HT 740 Allison
Woodbury CT.
chessie4905
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« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2013, 05:46:59 PM »

gearing is no problem; hook it up direct
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GMC h8h 649#028
Pennsylvania-central
scottandpenny
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« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2013, 06:05:38 PM »

hey that looks like an EMD. I used to work on those for the railroad, only ours were only 2300 hp at 900 rpm.
 scott
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1966 pd4107 Gm
Willamette valley Oregon
Dave5Cs
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1979 MCI MC5Cs 6V-71 HT-740 Allison, Roseville, CA




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« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2013, 07:45:24 PM »

We live 1 mile from the bottom of the hill in Roseville,California and hear those at night and in the mornings. I wouldn't be able to sleep if they didn't work on them anymore. "Big Orange" they call them here. Shocked Cool

Dave5Cs
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TomC
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« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2013, 08:52:23 AM »

It is a 20V-710 EMD (now owned by Caterpillar) train, generating, boat engine. If you looked at a cross section drawing of this engine, it is a big version of the 149 series (individual pot heads) and a direct cousin of our 53, 71, 92 series. Ironic that the railroad, tugs, generating plants are still using 2 stroke Diesels. And the largest Diesels in the world are 2 stroke engines-since you just simply cannot make a 4 stroke bigger then about 60,000hp (the 2 stroke 14 cylinder are around 130,000hp @ 102rpm) because of too much reciprocating mass. The big 2 stroke engines don't have counter balancing on the crankshaft since they only go up to 102rpm. But at a 98" stroke, that's like our 71/92 series running at just about 2000rpm. So it sounds slow, but imagine that 1500lb piston, 2600lb connecting rod going up and down 98" 102 times a minute. Next time you're on a excercycle, switch it to rpm and peddle up to 102 rpm-you'll see what I'm talking about. Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
opus
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« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2013, 09:40:55 PM »

Or this:
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1995 BB All-American - A Transformation.
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