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Author Topic: TomC  (Read 1980 times)
CrabbyMilton
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« on: June 11, 2013, 06:16:10 AM »

Hey Tom, you were telling us about some trucks 50-60 years ago having a BUICK inline 8 engine as an auxiliary power boost. Were these built into the trailer itself or was it an add on attached to the trailer? I would have been interesting to see that work.
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Scott Bennett
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« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2013, 07:24:06 AM »

Definitely interested in reading about this...
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Scott & Heather
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« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2013, 07:44:38 AM »


If that works  maybe I can get the 12v71 in to the back of huggy.  then I could really burn some diesel.

uncle ned
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« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2013, 08:10:35 AM »

Truck drivers will amaze you with their ideas that idea is still in use the military has pusher units with torque converters, Cole has the units that go behind his 300 ton lowboys with 650 hp Cummins engines with torque converters no transmissions he did use another truck for awhile and Cat uses the dual engine setup on some models of scraper  
« Last Edit: June 11, 2013, 08:14:21 AM by luvrbus » Logged

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CrabbyMilton
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« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2013, 09:15:16 AM »

I watched something on one of the cable networks where they were moving something too large( may have been a boat) for just one semi tractor so there was one pushing from the rear. But they weren't going much faster than walking speed. It reminds me of some trains where you see locomotives in the middle or end of a long long train. Bus and truck engines nowadays don't even break a sweat on steep grades but adding more power in the old days must have required some inventive ideas and interesting items of museum caliber.
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« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2013, 10:16:02 AM »

Before big 4WD tractors were available in western Canada farmers used to drop the front axles and scab two 2WD tractors together with varying degrees of sophistication.  The one that I saw up close was a pair of 930 Cases that were set up to drive from the rear seat with a pretty crude lever system to run the controls on the front engine.  That particular one had hand clutches - that rear platform would have been a very happening place when you made the turn on the headlands.  And it had no cab so you would get to eat the diesel smoke from 2 Case engines. 

Father used to tell stories about some neighbours who pushed snow on the municipal roads with a pair of WD series Internationals fitted up with a push pole between them.  The guy on the front tractor got to pick the gear and did so by holding up the appropriate number of fingers based on how bad the drifts looked ahead of him.
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« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2013, 03:16:52 PM »

TomC being in his 50's he may have a hard time remembering just how that setup worked
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« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2013, 04:51:51 PM »

Back when I was a kid and hauling logs we took a huge skyline yarder over a couple of mountain ranges with an off highway Kenworth pulling the yarder, and a log truck pulling on the front of that, and me pushing on the back end.

All I remember is dust so thick you couldn't see, and trying to coordinate three rigs all shifting at different times.  What a day.
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2013, 08:13:40 PM »

Mark was it a Madill (sp?) or a Washington yarder by chance? I have set chokers on both of those a long time ago.  Smiley
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« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2013, 06:44:02 AM »

The setup with a Buick straight 8 under the trailer was told to me by an old truck driver. I've been searching to see an info, but am coming up blank. Maybe was just a truck driver story...?

Best huge rig I ever saw was a couple years ago going up highway 395 from L.A. to Mammoth Lakes. At night, the old heat exchangers from San Onofre power station (which is being closed) were being transported to Utah to be buried since they were mildly nuclear reactive. The entire rig weighed in at 1.5 million pounds. Was pulled by one, and pushed by 4 trucks. When pulling the Cajon Pass, they added one to the front and pulled the pass at 18mph-pretty good! The best part, which I loved the best, was all the trucks were equipped with Allison 7spd 4700 automatics! I was at 4 corners where highways 58 and 395 came together and they stopped for a bit waiting for the next portion of 395 to be cleared (the truck took the entire width of the 2 lane). When they started out, the 1.5 million pounds just accelerated out as easy as could be. As compared to a Pete I once saw pulling a 250,000lb load-starting up the Pete bounced all over the place fighting to get rolling. Amazing how well a torque converter works to get a load moving. Virtually all military vehicles have automatics (mostly Allison). Good Luck, TomC
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CrabbyMilton
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« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2013, 09:31:13 AM »

Thanks Tom. I couldn't find anything either so maybe it was a homemade thing on the trailer or maybe the old guy was telling tales. Probably the same guy that siad he would have a beer or two with the Martians every Friday with their saucer parked outside. Amen on the ALLSION or any automatic transmission. I know there are stick die hards out there but as a 28 year delivery driver, I appreciate an automatic and all of the vehicles I used over the years never offered manual anyway. Then some say that automatics are for sissys. Tell that to as you said our mililtary. All firetrucks and police vehicles are automatic since those people have enough things on their mind without bothering about double clutching.
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« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2013, 12:48:19 PM »

Ed,
No, it was a Skagit.  Madill never made any real big ones I don't believe.  This was back in the days of 1 1/2" skyline cable.  We still had the tower on that yarder when we took it over the hills too.  Massive weight.  We had to go that way because it was too heavy for even off highway bridges.  It was all on Weyerhaeuser roads. 
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« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2013, 08:58:23 PM »

TomC, why do you post "stuff" like the San Onofre steam generator transportation Huh Shocked.  You know darn good and well that some idiot (like me) will spend half the evening searching for information on that "train". Wink Shocked Smiley

Since the transportation of the steam generators was done at night, the videos are not very good.  The best one I found was here:  http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=news/local/orange_county&id=8273330.  What an amazing adventure.

During the search, I ran across a TON of hits on the very premature failure of the replacement steam generators and the ultimate decision to close the plant.  The articles and blogs are very diverse in their thoughts on nuclear power and all the related "politics". 

One of the most interesting reads was a failure report (I love failure reports Shocked):  http://libcloud.s3.amazonaws.com/93/86/5/1285/Fairewinds_FOE_Cascading_Steam_Generator_Failures_San_Onofre_2012_4_12.pdf.  That report prepared by Fairewind Assiociates is very interesting.  It talks about all of the seemingly minor design changes the Edison made on the replacement steam generator design.  I read several Fairewind studies and my guess is that they are not totally objective (some of their studies were commissioned by Friends of the Earth), but the data they present is pretty convincing.

How's that for thread drift?

Jim
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Jim Shepherd
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« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2013, 10:17:52 PM »

TomC, why do you post "stuff" like the San Onofre steam generator transportation Huh Shocked.  You know darn good and well that some idiot (like me) will spend half the evening searching for information on that "train". Wink Shocked Smiley

Since the transportation of the steam generators was done at night, the videos are not very good.  The best one I found was here:  http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=news/local/orange_county&id=8273330.  What an amazing adventure.

During the search, I ran across a TON of hits on the very premature failure of the replacement steam generators and the ultimate decision to close the plant.  The articles and blogs are very diverse in their thoughts on nuclear power and all the related "politics". 

One of the most interesting reads was a failure report (I love failure reports Shocked):  http://libcloud.s3.amazonaws.com/93/86/5/1285/Fairewinds_FOE_Cascading_Steam_Generator_Failures_San_Onofre_2012_4_12.pdf.  That report prepared by Fairewind Assiociates is very interesting.  It talks about all of the seemingly minor design changes the Edison made on the replacement steam generator design.  I read several Fairewind studies and my guess is that they are not totally objective (some of their studies were commissioned by Friends of the Earth), but the data they present is pretty convincing.

How's that for thread drift?

Jim


Wow, checked
Out the news article. Very cool. Definitely
Watch the video...shows you the magnitude of the trailers and steam generator. Wow.


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Scott & Heather
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TomC
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« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2013, 11:45:00 PM »

They talk about unit 2 and 3. Unit one was the first experimental nuclear power plant there that was disassembled years ago.

The combination of the massive costs of removing, transporting the steam generators to Utah, then installing the new steam generators. With the down time of not generating any income, and the fact that San Onofres new design didn't work, is the combination reason the power plant is being shuttered. Many around the plant are happy about that. It just goes to show that many times the original design is the best to work with. Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
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« Reply #15 on: June 13, 2013, 09:17:26 AM »

Ed H.,

Go to www.rustygrapple.com and there are tons of pictures of logging equipment.  Great site.  Might even be a pic of the tower you set chokers on back when you were a pup, lol.  Be sure to watch the great video on the Alaska History window.

Mark
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« Reply #16 on: June 15, 2013, 07:48:08 PM »

Nowadays they are all automatics, (Allisons?) but back-in-the-day, (1972-1978) the master mechanic did not like automatics, (didn't know anything about them?) and the city had to pay EXTRA to get the new American LaFrance fire apparatus built with Fuller T-905/1105M 5 speed MANUAL transmissions.

No big deal.  Most of us Engineer guys drove trucks on our day off and having to shift was no big deal.  I did break a companion flange in several pieces just backing up into the station.  Seems the DD8V71N governor was not quite right and I was a little bit rough with the clutch.  It was already cracked around 3 bolt holes.

We did have several new fire personnel who could not drive a stick shift vehicle at all and it was a "pain in the rear" trying to teach them to shift a fire engine.  No mechanical talent at all.  But FWIW, we did not have enclosed cabs, heaters, A/C, air bags, suspension seats or drink holders back then either.   HB of CJ (old coot)
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2013, 09:21:53 PM »

Hey Mark, thanks for that website. Brought back some memories for sure.  i worked for Weyerhauser from 77-81 out of the Snoqualmie Wa. mill.....all gone now.
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1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
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