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Author Topic: Painting Wheels  (Read 1464 times)
qayqayt
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« on: June 07, 2013, 11:33:58 PM »

I got the crazy notion in my head that I should paint the wheels on our bus.  I stripped them down and started with a coat of primer.  I went to NAPA and bought a couple of cans of glossy white acrylic enamel automotive paint.  Now that I've done the front wheels, I'm not really happy.  The finish isn't as glossy as I expected and the paint seems to scuff easily.  I was thinking of switching to Tremclad rust paint for the rear wheels.

Any advice? 

Bryan
Vancouver BC
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Bryan
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Jeremy
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« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2013, 02:08:04 AM »

I'm no expert but I strongly suspect that 'acrylic enamel' is a contradiction in terms - the term 'enamel' on a paint can is a bit like the term 'deep cycle' on a battery - they are words which don't have a precise definition and therefore get abused by manufacturers trying to sell things which don't really have the properties that the term historically referred to.

True 'enamel' finishes actually require baking in a kiln after being applied, and have an almost bullet-proof glossy finish. Oil-based ('synthetic') enamel paints gave a finish that was almost as good (I painted a Land Rover once in synthetic enamel paint, and the finish looked excellent and was as tough-as-nails). Whether you can still buy synthetic enamel in the US I don't know - in Europe you can as long as it's for plant or commercial vehicles - if it's for a car the law says you have to use acrylic or water-based paints, which are much softer

Jeremy
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Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2013, 02:10:17 AM »

 Any advice? 

   I had my wheels (very scratched and rusty) sandblasted and powder coated.  Looks great, nice and shiny -- chips (tire mounting bars, clip-on balancing weights, etc.) easily and rusts immediately at the chips.   Cry
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

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luvrbus
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« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2013, 07:23:37 AM »

Take it to wrought iron welder that has a electro magnetic sprayer they can paint the wheels on bus with the tires mounted cost about 1/3 of powder coating and looks the same it would be a better job with the tires dismounted IMO 

good luck
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lorna
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« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2013, 08:44:30 AM »

I painted the bumpers and rub rails on our skoolie with Rustoleum's Hammered enamel. It's tough and I can touch up any bad dings with a paint brush (same way I applied it). If I ever decide what colour to paint our rims, it will be in the brushed on Rustoleum Hammered paint. I don't have deep pockets. Our conversion has to come in at $4K not counting the generator. And so far, projected costs are coming in a few hundred below my budget. Unless PEX fittings go up again. Powder coatings and other pricey paints are out of our shoestring budget.
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Ednj
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« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2013, 11:46:48 AM »

Try your local truck tire place.
 most will trade you new wheels for yours, $25.00 , mounting balancing and stems extra
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MCI-9
Sussex county, Delaware.
See my picture's at= http://groups.yahoo.com/group/busshellconverters/
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----- This space for rent. -----
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« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2013, 04:07:31 PM »

Rattle can's are for little kids toy;s IMHO

Try this, they sell an additive for it. makes it brush on smooth and is a hardener.

 http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/store/majicreg%3B-all-purpose-enamel-oil-base-gloss-1-qt-white-103095699--1

 can't find a link for the additive?  But they have it in the store.

                                                                 HTH   JIm
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eagle19952
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« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2013, 04:32:14 PM »

FWIW, Canadian sold Trem-Clad and USA Rust-0-Leum are the same paint.... Grin
« Last Edit: June 10, 2013, 05:01:47 PM by eagle19952 » Logged
Uglydog56
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« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2013, 05:08:26 PM »

When I'm painting white like that, I always use appliance epoxy.  It seems to be a little tougher.  Also look at the temperature/humidity that's optimal for your spray paint - believe it or not, spray paint is just like real paint: prep and atmospheric conditions matter.  Maybe it didn't cure properly.
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Rick A. Cone
Silverdale, WA
66 Crowny Crown "The Ark"
qayqayt
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« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2013, 06:33:32 PM »

Thanks very much for all the replies.  This board has been a lifesaver many times for us.

Bryan
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Bryan
Vancouver BC
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« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2013, 08:03:58 PM »

The only thing I learned about painting is...No matter what paint or primer or color you use...Always, Always use a knew broom...Cable
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Sofar Sogood
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Everett, WA.
qayqayt
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« Reply #11 on: June 14, 2013, 09:54:58 AM »

Knew broom?  I just mask the whole side of the bus and fire a paint cannon at it.  The folks next door don't like it much.
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Bryan
Vancouver BC
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skihor
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« Reply #12 on: June 14, 2013, 10:19:06 AM »

When I'm painting white like that, I always use appliance epoxy.  It seems to be a little tougher.  Also look at the temperature/humidity that's optimal for your spray paint - believe it or not, spray paint is just like real paint: prep and atmospheric conditions matter.  Maybe it didn't cure properly.
I second Appliance Enamel spray can paint. Another trick to getting a smooth finish is to pre-heat the can in a pan of hot water. Boil the water then take it off of the stove and put the can in it for 5 minutes or so. That raises the pressure in the can resulting in better atomization, (finer paint particles), and a smoother finish. Prolly just as easy is buy a pint of decent automotive paint, and a cheap HVLP paint gun. IMHO the best is powdercoating.

Don & Sheila
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tom120
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« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2013, 05:13:02 PM »

Aerosol paint no matter what the can says is basically going to be air dried lacquer. to get a durable long lasting finish you need to spray out a catalyzed enamel or urethane with epoxy or zinc primer first. lacquer finishes shrink leaving a very thin low quality film that degrades rapidly.
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gus
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« Reply #14 on: June 18, 2013, 05:48:22 PM »

Same as Uglydog56, just scuff up the old paint with a non-metal pad and spray.

That white epoxy appliance is tough stuff when dry.
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PD4107-152
PD4104-1274
Ash Flat, AR
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