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Author Topic: Is my new rooftop A/C unit bad? (tripped breaker)  (Read 2565 times)
luvrbus
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« Reply #15 on: July 13, 2013, 07:57:52 PM »

Brian, you use insulated crimping sleeves for AC not a butt connector so I have been told over the years by the electrical guys
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Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
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« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2013, 09:15:40 PM »

Hi Brian,

I am leaning towards what Hightech has stated.

Deff check your generator voltage on full load.  If the voltage drops, the amp draw will go up.

I had a problem at the track today. The 50 amp breaker at the post I was plugged into tripped

several times. After eliminating my A/C's as the problem, I discovered my neutral connection

in my plug end was burning up. The loss or heating of the neutral  connection was drawling

excessive power and exceeding the 50 amp breakers limits thus tripping it. I replaced the plug

end and the problem was solved. It had me scratching my head for a while but I'm glad I felt

the plug as it was very hot..

Good Luck
Nick-

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« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2013, 11:35:07 PM »

I have some insulated crimping sleeves so I could redo the connection. 

My generator voltage is between 113 and 114 volts with all the A/C units running.  The voltage is about 126 no load.  The load regulation is not the best, but I just put in a new regulator.
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« Reply #18 on: July 14, 2013, 05:02:02 AM »

Brian, you use insulated crimping sleeves for AC not a butt connector so I have been told over the years by the electrical guys

Quick nanosecond thread hijack here: Cliff, what are your thoughts or anyone's thoughts on an alternative to wire nuts? I have already had issues with my A/C and other wire nutted connections coming loose and causing issues. Honestly I'd like a better solution that's safer and I'll rewire our entire coach if its a reliable connector. Are these as good as they say?: http://www.posi-lock.com/posilock.html


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Scott & Heather
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« Reply #19 on: July 14, 2013, 11:58:48 AM »


Quick nanosecond thread hijack here: Cliff, what are your thoughts or anyone's thoughts on an alternative to wire nuts? I have already had issues with my A/C and other wire nutted connections coming loose and causing issues. Honestly I'd like a better solution that's safer and I'll rewire our entire coach if its a reliable connector. Are these as good as they say?: http://www.posi-lock.com/posilock.html





I believe these are rated for automotive use per their own description.
I would not use them for AC circuits.
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« Reply #20 on: July 14, 2013, 01:09:08 PM »

What's wrong with good old-fashioned terminal strips? Cheap, easy to use and secure, and used in all sorts of domestic and industrial OEM equipment. I've never understood the point of re-inventing the wheel with things like 'wire nuts', which I have always thought looked marginal at best (although I will admit to never having actually come across a wire nut in person, much less used one myself).

Jeremy

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« Reply #21 on: July 14, 2013, 01:23:47 PM »

Jeremy, a question?

How are houses wired in UK?  Are wire nuts not used for all the light-switch, receptacles and lights?  Do you use terminal strips for this application?

Just curious,

GaryD
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« Reply #22 on: July 14, 2013, 04:00:46 PM »

I'm 95% certain that wiring a house 'correctly' should never require any connections to be made other than those into the built-in connectors of the switches / sockets / light fittings etc. Having to join cables together at any other place would only happen if you'd cut the cable too short or something. There may be odd occasions (perhaps when a light is controlled by more than 3 switches) where there may a legitimate 'extra' connection to be made, and on those occasions I'm sure it would be correct to use a terminal strip connector (which do, after all, essentially replicate the built-in connectors in the sockets and switches etc).

My house is over 100 years old and when I bought it the wiring was probably 50 years old (stranded steel wire with fabric insulation etc). So, having re-wired the whole house myself, I think I know what good practice is from having always carefully followed instructions in DIY books etc, but I've certainly never had any official training so I've no idea what the 'code' says here about terminal strips vs wire nuts etc.

Jeremy
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« Reply #23 on: July 14, 2013, 04:32:00 PM »

Jeremy, I sent you a private email.

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« Reply #24 on: July 14, 2013, 04:38:01 PM »

Here all connections are made in a junction box of some type,wire nuts are not that popular in new construction most contractors use insulated crimp sleeves in a J box,busse bars or terminal strips are not used except in the switch gear panel most of our stuff here is 110v  
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« Reply #25 on: July 14, 2013, 05:13:24 PM »

For the sake of my own curiosity I just did a quick Google and found this:

Why are wire nuts used in electrical work in US but not Europe?

In the UK they were generally called 'thimbles'.
They have been illegal here since sometime in the 50s.

Any joints have to have some definite mechanical connection & all forms of twisted wire joint were banned.

Any terminal or joint should have enough pressure to create a 'gas tight' connection between the conductors to prevent them oxidising at the point of contact, and a thimble does not create sufficient pressure to do that.

If the wires oxidise, the contact resistance goes up so the joint gets hot under load and can be a fire risk.

Soldered joints are OK as they are gastight, but you are not allowed to use solder-tinned wires in to screw terminals as the solder is soft & can continue to flow after the terminal has been tightened.


Jeremy

PS - My guess would be - as lurvbus intimated - that it's the different voltage that's the key to this - presumably the chance of sparking / arcing at a connection is a lot higher with 240v passing through it, so more effort is made to ensure a tight joint.
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« Reply #26 on: July 14, 2013, 07:09:42 PM »

I have done a reasonable amount of electrical work, though certainly not on a professional scale.  I have never seen a wire nut fail.  However, if I use one in the bus I will generally put tape around the connector and wires just to be sure that vibration won't back it off.  Again, I mention that I have yet to see a problem.  Now, I am sure that others will have some contrary experiences.
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« Reply #27 on: July 14, 2013, 07:55:28 PM »

Ok, so when you wire a light fixture in the ceiling. It comes with black white and green pr ground. How would you connect those three wires to your romex? Use a terminal? I'm not understanding how they do it in Europe . Jeremy, you have a pic?


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« Reply #28 on: July 14, 2013, 07:57:46 PM »

These??


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« Reply #29 on: July 15, 2013, 12:47:36 AM »

Ok, so when you wire a light fixture in the ceiling. It comes with black white and green pr ground. How would you connect those three wires to your romex? Use a terminal? I'm not understanding how they do it in Europe . Jeremy, you have a pic?


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...It comes with black white and green pr ground.

I think this is the key difference because our fittings don't come with any wires attached, just terminals. Here are some pics:







So there you have three different types of circuit which all use the same type of standard light fitting, without the need for any 'extra' connections. But there may be other variations (as I said, for multiple switches etc) that do.

BTW, as you'll have gathered, our wiring colours are different as well

Jeremy
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