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Author Topic: pretty stainless steel fuel lines  (Read 531 times)
bobofthenorth
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« on: July 22, 2013, 03:59:24 PM »

I've developed a pinhole leak in the line that runs from the little gear pump on the end of the camshaft up to the fuel rail on what I refer to as the left hand side of the engine (curbside if it matters).  Its actually a huge relief because my engine has been wet forever and I couldn't figure out WTH it was coming from but it is finally leaking seriously enough that I can isolate the leak. Its going to be a genuine PITA to get the line off the fitting on the block but leaving that aside for a few minutes, what I'd like to replace it with is the same pretty stainless covered line that currently delivers engine oil to my turbo.  Anybody know what that stuff is called and where I can buy it in Saskatchewan?

I figure if I'm going to go through the grief of changing one line I'll change the whole damn works of them and make them look pretty at the same time.  I've seen all that shiny stainless on Sonny's pussycat and while I know I will never be able to keep it as clean as his I'd like to at least get started on making mine look a little bit pretty.
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R.J.(Bob) Evans
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Jeremy
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« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2013, 04:13:17 PM »

Can't help with a local supplier, but the stuff is called braided hose, and lots of places sell it on-line. If it's the appearance you're only really after, you can buy just the braided stainless sleeve itself and use it to cover existing hoses. The sleeves are a very universal fit (ie, one size sleeve will fit a wide range of hose diameters), and you just hide the ends of the braided sleeve by covering it with a suitably polished stainless steel hose clip - and in fact you can also buy fake versions of the fancy anodised aluminum hose ends, which just slip over a standard hose clip.

All a bit bling for a bus though!

Jeremy
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Stormcloud
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« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2013, 05:53:46 PM »

....and with the cost of fuel up here, the sooner the better! 
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Mark Morgan    near Brandon, Manitoba, Canada
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« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2013, 06:01:37 PM »

Sonnie has chromed stainless lines you buy those from people like Summit racing and others,tell me what size you need I have a few yours for a shrimp dinner lol you cook Doyle will wait till you get here 
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chessie4905
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« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2013, 06:39:14 PM »

  I bought mine from Summit Racing for lines for my car and some to add an electric fuel pump for bleeding filters on the coach. They carry Aeroquip and Earls. I stayed pretty much with Aeroquip, since they have been around forever. You need some patience to install the ends, depending on how much pressure you are dealing with. Carefully read installation instructions for the ends and check out tips online. Many automotive shops make custom lines to order, however, I intensely dislike crimped on fittings. They are always bulky and a waste of fittings if hose leaks down the road. Keep in mind that just about every darn hose type: high ,medium, low, multi ply, etc. needs specific compatible ends to be reliable.
  If you have an Aeroquip or Parker-Hannifin distributor locally, or even a NAPA or equiv, you may find what you need. You need to be familiar with pipe threads, male, female, 45 degree, JIC, straight thread, inverted flare, flare, etc. There are many resources that explain these terms online; McMaster-Carr as an example. You may or may not be aware of these terms already. I did some careful study before I ordered fittings and hoses, so I got what I needed. Same as to assembly. There is a specific procedure to cut the braided hose so it doesn't fray out. I taped it like they recommended and cut midway in the taped area with a dremel with a cutoff blade with satisfactory results. Sometimes you need to take a small screwdriver to work the start of the braids into the fitting so they don't just flare out. I'm sure others on here can offer additional tips.
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bevans6
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« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2013, 03:17:39 AM »

There are two basic types of stainless hose, teflon lined for high pressure and temperature, and rubber lined for low pressure, under around 300 psi.  The hose ends can be somewhat interchangeable but there are more types of low pressure hose construction and you need to make sure you get the right hose end for the type of hose you have.  Teflon hose is pretty much all the same.  You have to be careful about the angle of the taper on the hose end - most racing stuff is AN, and uses a 37 degree taper while most industrial stuff (the bus included) is 45 degree taper.  There are at least two different styles of 45 degree taper fitting and I never figured out the names, I just took the old part in when I bought new.  I bought from an Aeroquip hydraulic hose place.  The industrial hose that I used for my engine has a black fabric cover over the stainless braid, it's actually high pressure hydraulic hose but I used it for both air and fuel.  I cut all types of hose with a metal shear, mine is a Beverly shear. 

Brian
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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2013, 04:06:24 AM »

here is Summit's site on hoses.
http://www.summitracing.com/search/department/fittings-hoses

  If you decide to go with them or not, I would have them send you a catalog, as figuring which hose and end is difficult online. I used teflon lined hose for all of my needs.
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