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Author Topic: Brake job... Looks simple ???  (Read 940 times)
Gordie Allen
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« on: August 25, 2013, 09:52:53 PM »

I pulled the right front wheel and drum on my 4104 to evaluate the situation.  First inspection since I got the bus 16 mo ago.  It's currently stopping just fine.  I found the brake linings look like they're ready for replacement.  Drums don't appear to need turning or replacing, but I have a parts bus with four more drums to look at.  I haven't  looked at the other three corners yet, but plan to do all.
Questions:
Looks simple enough.  Is there something I'm missing?
Where can I get linings?  I was going to call Luke in the morning.
Are the lining screws going to be a battle?
There's a very brief description of brake lining replacement in the Maintenance Manual, but no pix.  The Parts Manual has pix of brake shoe assemblies.  According to the Parts Manual, I will need 2 PAIR of liners for each corner, screws to screw on the liners, and dowels over the screws.  Anything else.  And tips?
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Augusta, MI
1956 4104
DD 671
TomC
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« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2013, 10:00:53 PM »

Pull the shoes and take to a commercial brake store to have them replace the lining. There are close to 20 different types of linings available. My choice would be a lining that would work when the drum is cold with relatively good heat resistance. Standard gray block is all right-standard on trucks. Yes it is easy-just have to get the springs mounted correctly. Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
chessie4905
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« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2013, 08:04:41 AM »

   Couple of things more. Carefully measure inside diameter of brake drums. If they have been cut, or need cut, you may need to go to oversize lining blocks. Blocks have friction characteristics in the way of letters ff fg hh, etc. Many of factory spec lining for the coaches were designed for commercial use with longevity as first concern, with stopping ability equal or second, and noise maybe third. Anyway, some research as to these characteristics on the lining manufacturer websites, or a good heavy duty brake component supplier that doesn't just have parts pushers, wouldn't be a bad idea. I believe the 4104 parts book had the friction lining letter ratings listed in the description of the lining part number. You may be able to still read it on the side of the brake blocks. Mfgs. stamp this info on them when new and it is pretty durable. I would use new bolts to assemble them or have them riveted to good shoes. If you can still get the hole plugs, you may want to add them also, as it adds a couple of more square inches of braking area, an important consideration, since 4104's don't have as big brakes as newer models. They will need to be filed or ground down flush with the rest of lining, if they stick up some after installation. Remember to use a good dust/ particle mask while doing the brake work to avoid asbestos dust inhalation. Avoid blowing the dust around with compressed air.
   You should remove slack adjusters, brake camshafts, and check shaft surface for noticeable wear. New camshaft bushings, springs, rollers, seals etc ought be replaced if worn, rusted or suspect. Any slop or lost motion in the  components will cause increase of travel of brake chamber actuator rod before applying brakes. Slack adjusters only have so much travel till they need re adjusted. Also check carefully the machined surface on the axle stub that the inner inside of  wheel bearing rides for any wear. Excess wear here will effect proper brake adjustment, and cause oil seal leaking issues, because the hub and drum will ride off center slightly or more so, depending on amount of wear. I don't think this is a common problem, but at least check for it. We did find this problem on our 4104, after a repeat oil seal failure. Do it right this time, and you shouldn't have to do it ever again. Luke can get most parts needed if not available locally. You may want to consider new drums while you are at it. There not that costly considering their size, and you won't have the expense of cutting the old ones and getting oversize lining, rollers, etc.
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Gordie Allen
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« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2013, 07:08:08 PM »

Thanks chessie-4905, lots of good info. 
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Augusta, MI
1956 4104
DD 671
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« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2013, 08:46:41 PM »

I would sure like to look at my brakes but i don't think i could handle the weight of the wheel how do you remove and re install the wheel when your not twenty anymore?
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TomC
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« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2013, 08:55:16 PM »

Like any tire man does-with a about 3-4ft prey bar. It is a combo prey bar and bead breaker. The tire men just use the prey bar to walk the tire back to the mounting position. I have NEVER seen a tire man attempt to hand lift a tire on. It is fairly easy with the prey bar. Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
Dave5Cs
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1979 MCI MC5Cs 6V-71 HT-740 Allison, Roseville, CA




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« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2013, 10:03:30 PM »

I use 2 4 foot bars. 1 on each side of the bottom of the tire, about a 1 foot spread. Lift the bar ends up that are under the tire edges. Just a little and it will raise it then slowly pull the bars back a little at a time and the bottom of the tire will be out further than the top. I slide a small 2x4 under the tire and just lean it back tome and roll it out. Don't try to man handle it you will break your back. Wink

Dave5Cs
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bevans6
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« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2013, 04:17:46 AM »

Pry bars for sure, or if you have one a pallet jack works.  Getting the  hub at the right height is also key - you want to be able to pop the wheel on the hub easy, but then have enough clearance to work it back without catching on the ground.

Brake job is easy if you know what to look for.  You can take the opportunity to replace or inspect pivot pins, cam rollers and springs.  The hardest part is getting the drum off.

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
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