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Author Topic: Chips for tea  (Read 944 times)
Jeremy
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« on: September 04, 2013, 05:11:56 PM »

Just seen an advert on TV here which extensively features Eagle buses!

Whether it's used abroad as well or not I don't know, but I'm guessing not as the term 'chips' (rather than 'fries' etc) is very much a British thing I think.

What I want to know is why they didn't choose a decent bus like a old classic Plaxton or Duple  Wink

Chips For Tea - The New McCain TV Ad



Jeremy
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Iceni John
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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2013, 06:02:25 PM »

Did Eagle make any right-hand drive buses?   Those are early Eagles, so did the Belgians make them for export to the UK?   I would have thought that any Eagles of that vintage in a maritime climate would have devolved into rust many eons ago.

Apparently "French" fries originated in Belgium, so perhaps the ad agency knows something about old buses.

I agree, a classic old British bus would have been good to see.

John 
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Jeremy
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« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2013, 12:43:15 AM »

Eagles in Britain - interesting question. Years ago I did see a small piece in a bus magazine about an Eagle being restored in Scotland, and I think that was for use in an advert too, so could even be this 'chips' bus.

I've done some Googling and have found a couple of other references to Eagles in Britain:

- A Trailways bus on a promotional tour to the UK in 1962 to advertise holidays to America to the British public - there's a video on this page:

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/silver-eagle-coach-visits-britain


- A magazine article, co-incidentally also from 1962, which appears to be a road-test of an Eagle demonstration bus by a British bus operator (in fact I guess it's that same promotional Trailways bus) - makes quite interesting reading as a comparison of American and British buses of the day:


The 'Silver Eagle is a Peet emblem of Continental Trailways, whose headquarters are in Dallas, Texas, hut whose 3,000 vehicles operate on routes covering the greater part of the United States. The coach now in Britain was, however, built in Belgium by the Bus and Car Co., a concern in which Continental Trailways have a 50 per cent, interest. The works, near Bruges, are understood to have been in operation about two years and apart from building vehicles for use in America it is understood that they are also to produce passenger vehicles of suitable design for sale in Europe.

The coach, despite its country of origin, has an entirely American character. Of Continental Trailways design, it incorporates mechanical units exported from the United States. Its length, 40 ft., is 4 ft. more than now permitted in this country but its width, at 8 ft., is 2i• in, less than now permissible here. It is, however, appreciably heavier than any British public service vehicle, weighing some 12 tons unladen, whereas even the most luxurious of our 36-ft. coaches weigh about 8 tons 5 cwt.

This is, to a limited extent, no doubt due to the requirement in many States that vehicles over 30 ft. long must have three axles, in much the same way as used to apply to the longest buses in this country. The tyres fitted are Goodrich Silvertown Nylon 11.00-20 (12-ply), twins being fitted to the driven leading bogie axle only.,

The resulting wheel-arch problem may have been one • of the reasons for the high seating level chosen, but this leaves ample room for the rear-mounted engine and side luggage compartments. The engine is a General Motors 8V-71 Vee-8 two-stroke, of 9,3 litres capacity and developing 263 gross b.h.p. at 2,100 r.p.rn. and a maximum gross torque of 760 lb.ft. at 1,200 r.p.m, It is mounted with its crankshaft on the vehicle centre-line behind the rearmost axle, the drive being taken forward through a Spicer fourspeed constant-mesh gearbox.

The standard Silver Eagle coach has 46 seats and a toilet compartment at the rear, although the demonstration coach had one pair of seats removed to accommodate a small servery.

.I sat. towards‘the rear, and certainly did not have to be told that the engine had been started. It had appeared to be rigidly mounted on the underframing when I examined its installation, and this impression was supported by the appreciable noise and vibration evident inside the vehicle.. When it moved off, the engine note took on the " snarling character familiar on British two-stroke diesels.

The vibration died out as the speed rose but the noise level remained high by British coach standards whenever the engine was pulling. Moving forward, I found that this noise level diminished until it became quite innocuous in the front seats. The vehicle has Goodrich Torsilatic suspension and the ride quality, aided by comfortable adjustable seats, was very good.

It was surprising, on a vehicle of American origin, to find, that the driver was having to wrestle with heavy steering. Full lock was required to negotiate some roundabouts and the number of turns from lock to lock was evidently little more than four. -With no power assistance this, nor unnaturally, caused the driver, a Belgian, to mutter under his breath.

En other respects the vehicle did not seem difficult to drive. The engine had a very flexible performance and four speeds proved quite adequate despite the high gearing which gave 73 m.p.h. at 2,100 engine r.p.m. in top gear on MI. The weather did not allow the speed to be taken any higher, but a few more m.p.h. were undoubtedly available. Very comprehensive instrumentation was provided.

Comparative runs on the Midland Red motorway coaches showed that there was little to choose in terms of the standards of travel offered. The American vehicle had slightly more comfortable seats, appropriate to the longer distances to be covered, but the Midland Red coaches are quieter at speed and give, better forward vision to the passenger's.



Lastly, there's bus operators here called both 'Golden Eagle' and 'Fraser Eagle'. For the sake of posting a photo of a Neoplan, here's one of Fraser Eagle's units:





Jeremy


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Charles in SC
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« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2013, 07:10:23 AM »

Thanks for the neat video. I guess they are advertising their potato products for dinner. I would like to have one of those busses with the stage in the rear area.
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« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2013, 07:31:06 AM »

Eagle made and shipped lots of right hand drive buses some made here in the States MOL built right handed and left handed Eagles in Europe in the 80's they were more advanced than the Brownsville Eagle 

I know where 2 of the cargo carriers Eagles are that were built by MOL full tandem drive like the Crowns with Man diesel engines I have been trying to buy the 2 for several years rust and all Roll Eyes
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« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2013, 11:44:20 AM »

McCains is a fine Maritime Canada company, established in Florenceville, New Brunswick and now one of the largest frozen food companies in the world.  We stop at a diner off the highway near Florenceville sometimes, and I am always struck that if you order something that comes with French Fries (chips) they ask if you want fresh-cut or McCains...  Lots of loyalty there.

Brian
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