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Author Topic: Mounting the new inverter...  (Read 1036 times)
bevans6
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« on: September 04, 2013, 11:01:03 AM »

Now that I have my new Magnum 4024 inverter, I have questions about how people have mounted these things, and where.  My bus is set up so the drivers side of the front luggage bay is the electrical center.  I have a plywood wall that separates the outer two feet of the bay from the other side, and my various switches and breaker panels are mounted on the plywood.  My batteries are just forward in the old condenser bay along with the generator.  I had my old inverter mounted on the plywood as well, but the new one is both too heavy, and has a warning not to mount it on combustible material.  My next thought is to mount it on the floor of the bay.  I don't know why but I am a little worried about that, sometimes it gets a little wet from condensation.  What have others done with their big inverters?

Brian
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lostagain
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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2013, 11:36:10 AM »

Mine is mounted on the ceiling of the bay. Suspended by strapping. So if you have the space up there, it could be a good solution.

JC
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JC
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bevans6
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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2013, 11:45:33 AM »

That is actually a great idea!  I like it...  Keeps it off the floor, uses dead space.

Brian
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Dave5Cs
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« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2013, 11:57:01 AM »

Ours was in the hall closet but was burnt out when we bought the bus. Batteries are in the back so when we get a new one will have to figure it out also. Ceiling would be good.

Dave5Cs from Galaxy S III
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Mike in GA
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« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2013, 12:28:43 PM »

Our Trace 4024 is mounted vertically on metal bracing that goes floor to ceiling of our 1st bay on the curb side. It is mounted with the read-out window facing the bay door, which makes for easy reading. Also in this bay is my large Snap-On tool cabinet and my 4 large Rolls Surrette house batteries.
Yes, the compartment is well ventilated. 13 years - no problems.
Mike in GA
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sledhead
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« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2013, 02:45:44 PM »

mine is suspended  3 " below the ceiling in the front bay with the 3/4 " strap with the holes in it lots of air all the way around it, never a heat problem.   16" from the battery box .

dave
« Last Edit: September 05, 2013, 04:47:01 AM by sledhead » Logged

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Len Silva
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« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2013, 03:00:57 PM »

The most important factor is to mount it as close to the batteries as possible.  You want to keep the cable length under 4 feet if you can.
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« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2013, 03:18:57 PM »

I built a 1inch angle iron stand (cage) for my stacked Trace inverters it set 3 inches off the floor this is the way Trace to me to do it 

I am a little hard headed and wanted the inverters no more that 2 ft from the battery bank and not take a chance on getting  wet it was nice I could wash the bay out without the fear of getting one wet 
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 03:22:49 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2013, 03:59:24 AM »

I'm still a little while from mounting mine, but I'm thinking of doing what Clifford did and building a frame to mount it on. I'm probably going to put the frame on some small vibration isolators to get it an inch or two higher off the floor and to, you know, isolate vibration. I want as much air circulation as possible. Seems to me that mounting it on the top of the compartment wouldn't allow heat to dissipate as well since heat rises, but that's just my initial thinking.
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Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2013, 07:12:55 AM »

 ... Seems to me that mounting it on the top of the compartment wouldn't allow heat to dissipate as well since heat rises, but that's just my initial thinking.  

    I think that that is a good point.  My inverter (12V Outback) has a "trigger" output and I was hoping to use that with a relay to activate a cooling fan.  A small fan wouldn't use much power and I would feel better about any extra cooling for my inverter.  (But I got distracted by other stuff and didn't track down if that trigger circuit comes on exactly when I'd need it to.)
« Last Edit: September 06, 2013, 07:19:51 AM by Oonrahnjay » Logged

Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
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Sam 4106
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« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2013, 07:31:33 AM »

I mounted my Magnum 4024 on a 3/8" aluminum plate, that I had on hand, on a stand about 4" off the bay floor. The plate provides a good heat sink and the stand allows air circulation. In addition there are two muffin fans blowing air into the compartment when the thermostat turns them on. So far the over heat control has not activated when using a roof air through the inverter.

Good luck, Sam
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Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #11 on: September 06, 2013, 09:14:24 AM »

  I mounted my Magnum 4024 on a 3/8" aluminum plate, that I had on hand, on a stand about 4" off the bay floor. The plate provides a good heat sink and the stand allows air circulation. In addition there are two muffin fans blowing air into the compartment when the thermostat turns them on. So far the over heat control has not activated when using a roof air through the inverter.

Good luck, Sam

    Thanks, Sam.  That's good to know.   
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
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