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Author Topic: More torque issues at the tire shop  (Read 4546 times)
belfert
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« Reply #15 on: September 08, 2013, 09:44:17 AM »

I don't think they used a torque stick, but I could be wrong.  It just looked like a standard 1" impact with extended anvil.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #16 on: September 08, 2013, 10:40:40 AM »

Brian,  all you needed to do was ask them to two stage torque the wheel.   Tell them that you want the initial torque at 450ft lbs and the second one at 500..   They have to physically change the setting on the wrench.   If they have a fit, take your money to another tire shop.   
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tomhamrick
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« Reply #17 on: September 09, 2013, 06:51:18 AM »

Just wondering how you check the left had threads for proper torque? Do you have a torque wrench that works in both directions?
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Tom Hamrick
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« Reply #18 on: September 09, 2013, 06:57:10 AM »

I put my weight on the end of a 3 foot bar: 170lbs X 3 = 510lbs.

JC
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JC
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belfert
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« Reply #19 on: September 09, 2013, 06:58:40 AM »

Torque wrenches designed specifically for tire service can mount the socket on either side of the head for dealing with left hand threads.  I have one that I got real cheap from an online pawn shop.  I think I spent a total of $175 after having the wrench tested and calibrated.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
luvrbus
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« Reply #20 on: September 09, 2013, 07:18:48 AM »

JC's method works as good as anything,I do not understand the fear of a impact gun on wheel lugs Alcoa says it's ok 

Some of you guys would faint if seen the heavy haulers tightening the lug nuts on their rigs,my McIntyre low bow had 1/16 inch larger studs than most buses the book called for 900 lbs on the stud pilot wheels same wheel  just different studs
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belfert
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« Reply #21 on: September 09, 2013, 08:38:04 AM »

How many brake rotors have been warped on passenger vehicles by over torquing lug nuts?  I want my lug nuts torqued to spec regardless if the spec is 95 ft lbs, 450-500 ft lbs, or 900 ft lbs.    Over tightening can be just as bad as under tightening.

I personally have my doubts that the average tire guy with a 1" impact can tighten the lug nuts within even 50 lbs of spec.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #22 on: September 09, 2013, 08:45:06 AM »

I put my weight on the end of a 3 foot bar: 170lbs X 3 = 510lbs.

JC


I'm with you JC, torquing was being done way before torque wrenches came about.  The wrenches come in handy for someone that has a multi use for one on a daily basis, but is not "needed" for those of us that have a sporadic use.  A 100 Lb person can easily torque a wheel nut to 500 ft/lbs with the use of leverage!

Ed
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luvrbus
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« Reply #23 on: September 09, 2013, 09:01:12 AM »

If you are so concerned about the torque Brian loosen and torque the damn things that will give you a peace of mind  

I doubt one can be in 50lbs of torque with a torque wrench you may have it on studs and nuts but with a dry torque most like to use it is not going to be the same against the wheels on no 2 lug nuts dry torquing is a hit and miss that is why it is not used on engines
« Last Edit: September 09, 2013, 09:12:08 AM by luvrbus » Logged

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joel_newton
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« Reply #24 on: September 09, 2013, 09:04:45 AM »

I've never seen anyone use a torque wrench on semis - even with Alcoa rims.  In talking with the manager of a local tire shop (major "respected" chain), he said of all the freight lines they service, only one was on a torque program.  They keep a torque wrench on site for them.  They have their impact wrenches calibrated once a year.  He claims their techs are very accurate in torquing.  Had a blow-out on my pickup in another city on vacation. Went to the same chain.  I noticed them using a torque wrench on my Alcoa rims.

Also spoke with one of the owners (second generation) of a local wheel and brake shop.  He also claimed their techs were accurate with impact wrenches.  Verified by periodic checking with a torque wrench.

A friend who has been a heavy diesel mechanic for 35 years only uses an impact wrench.  Thought I'd pass on asking him if he was accurate.

IMHO experienced tire changers and mechanics at mainstream/reputable shops are capable of torquing lugs acceptably on trucks and buses - including Alcoa rims.

That said - I'm not experienced and I'm going to use my torque wrench!  The head is reversible for left-hand threads.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #25 on: September 09, 2013, 09:24:15 AM »

Good tire shops have their impact on a regulated air supply the PSI never changes so the impact gun never changes
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belfert
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« Reply #26 on: September 09, 2013, 10:19:51 AM »

My understanding is over torquing the nuts could stretch the studs.  Loosening and tightening them again isn't going to undo any possible damage.  That said I'm leaving this thread.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #27 on: September 09, 2013, 11:11:21 AM »

It would be best while you are parked to know if they did indeed stretched the studs when one is stretched it will be come a major problem to remove I am just trying to keep you from worrying so much
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eagle19952
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« Reply #28 on: September 09, 2013, 04:26:40 PM »

one can always check the nominal static stud length with a deep throated dial indicator, and recheck post torque the dynamic stretch length....adding these 60 sums and dividing for average would indicate stud life and deformation....a simpler, more visible method to analyze would be to carry a thread pitch gage to see the effect that over torque had on the threads...if any.
all of the many tire men that I have known in construction (gravel paving cement and fluids transport, including oil rig moves) have a special place they store that torque wrench.... Grin after all temperature and humidity and excess light effect them.
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Tony LEE
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« Reply #29 on: September 10, 2013, 03:12:24 AM »

Well now that we've established that all tyre techs can torque any nut up to any torque they want using any rattle gun they pick up off the floor, how about we sort out whether using antiseize or other lubricants makes any difference from an engineering point of view.
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