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Author Topic: Air in fuel system.  (Read 715 times)
Tikvah
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« on: September 10, 2013, 01:35:45 PM »

They changed the fuel filters and now it won't start.

I know they filled the filters.

Ideas?
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I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
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Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
luvrbus
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« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2013, 01:43:19 PM »

Remove the plug in the top of the filter base use a bottle,electric pump or a garden sprayer and pressure the system with fuel  it will fire on a MCI the fuel pressure switch needs pressure
« Last Edit: September 10, 2013, 03:27:06 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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Tikvah
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« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2013, 02:25:29 PM »

That did it.  They actually put a little air pressure in the tank to get fuel out the lines.  Then reconnected and fired.  Stalled once, then stayed running.
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I couldn't repair my brakes, so I made my horn louder.
1989 MCI-102 A3
DD 6V92 Turbo, Alison
Tons of stuff to learn!
Started in Cheboygan, Michigan (near the Mackinaw Bridge).  Now home is anywhere we park
Sam 4106
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« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2013, 03:14:18 PM »

The trick I learned at Interstate Detroit Diesel last summer is to change one filter at a time. Start the engine after you fill and change primary filter and hold the engine at half throttle until the engine smoothes out. Repeat that with the secondary and you will not loose prime. Works well for me.

Good luck, Sam
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1976 MCI-8TA with 8V92 DDEC II and Allison HT740
Geoff
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« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2013, 04:10:53 PM »

The basic procedure is to fill the new filters before putting them on, then make sure the engine is reved up when you start it.  It will miss a little but the high rpms keep it running until it primes itself.

Oh, and make sure youi fill the new filters with CLEAN fuel, not some crap you have laying around.  I just had to rebuild an engine that someone primed the filters with dirty fuel.  Two of the injectors got plugged, and the worst one plugged all the injector holes but one which burned a hole in the piston.

(Special note to Clifford-- this is the MCI I worked on at your restaurant).

--Geoff
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Geoff
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gus
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« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2013, 06:46:37 PM »

I've always used the same system as Sam, never any problems since I started doing it his way.
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bobofthenorth
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« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2013, 08:35:49 AM »

What the other guys said but just in case I cut the valve stem out of an old inner tube so that I had about a 10 inch circle of rubber with a valve stem in the middle.  If you wrap that around your fuel filler and tie it with a zip tie or hose clamp its easy to add enough pressure to the tank to fill the lines.
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R.J.(Bob) Evans
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« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2013, 10:37:03 AM »

Being extremely lazy I just turn the priming pump on for 10 seconds and then start normally.

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
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chessie4905
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« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2013, 10:41:00 AM »

   Spend the money and add an electric fuel pump. Then, you can change  fuel filters yourself, and save enough money for the fuel pump, fittings, wiring,and etc., even labor if you can't do it yourself.
Especially handy if you accidently run the fuel in tank too low. Shocked
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bobofthenorth
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« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2013, 10:45:50 AM »

Being much lazier than Brian I bought the primer pump, stuck it in a bay and now carry it around as baggage, having never got around to installing it.
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R.J.(Bob) Evans
1981 Prevost 8-92, 10 spd
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Simply growing older is not the same as living.
Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2013, 11:07:15 AM »

     Spend the money and add an electric fuel pump. Then, you can change  fuel filters yourself, and save enough money for the fuel pump, fittings, wiring,and etc., even labor if you can't do it yourself.
Especially handy if you accidently run the fuel in tank too low. Shocked   

     Yeah.  And you only run out of fuel - get bad fuel and have to drain - have to park on a steep slope and uncover the pickup point - etc. it's always on dark rainy nights.  Purely for the peace of mind, the few $$$ one costs is worth it.
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
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