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Author Topic: Why is inside dual tire wearing/  (Read 1423 times)
chessie4905
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« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2013, 01:56:19 PM »

   Get rid of that tread pattern.(when they are worn out) Those blocks distort every time they touch the pavement during rotation. More so on the one edge. I do assume that they are closely matched in overall diameter. Do they usually run at the same relative temperature?An IR temp gun will work nicely and now that they are reasonable in price, they are a worthwhile item to add to your tool box. Most use a steer tire all around and don't experience those issues, although cupping can be an issue on the front.
   Tires used in dual applications have a lower load rating each than when used in single applications. You can verify this by consulting tire manufacturer's load tables.
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GMC h8h 649#028
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wg4t50
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« Reply #16 on: November 12, 2013, 04:05:28 PM »

Did not see it mentioned, but a bad camber would also cause a goofy wear also, maybe both sides ?   Over the life of these vehicles, you never know what has been hooked to what or dropped on a corner etc, etc,...
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MCI7 20+ Yrs
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opus
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« Reply #17 on: November 12, 2013, 06:30:11 PM »

I run tires pretty much that tread as well.  Cant get rid of them though, we are always in snow or muddy roads. My wear is about the same.  I will have to check about the air pressure and adjust from there.
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1995 BB All-American - A Transformation.
Larry B
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« Reply #18 on: November 12, 2013, 07:28:31 PM »

 Hello everyone and thank you for all the replies. The tires I have are a load range "H" and the number of 6780  lbs carring capacity is for dual tire load. From what I read in most of the replies I am thinking i am carrying too much pressure. Most of the highways I have driven on are paved roads, not allways the transCanada but good paved roads. Last summer before driving from Alberta to Vancouver in British columbia and then to Kenora in Ontario I had a wheel alignment done . The align shop said it was really good and as far as front to rear he said it was within 1/4" (dog tracking).   I will find the manufactures load to tire pressure chat. If you figure math wise on a proportionate base (axle weight to max axle carrying weight of four tires at max pressure)=85psi.    
      19,000/27,000lbs  X   120psi= 85psi  This is likely just coincidence to the what others suggest I should be carrying.
      There is a highway scales near by that not always has someone there but is open 24hrs. and left tured on. I could go there and get individual tire weights.  The only other markings on tire sidewall are L.R. H (load range H )     16P.A.do not have a clue what that means or what wheel position  -  S.D.T means. I do not know if this tire is rated for 75MPH.
         I do have an ir temp. gun .What is the best way to use it?  Am I correct in assuming that after at least a 10 mile drive you would immediately get out and check temp. of each tire. On an average summer day of 80 degrees outside( not 110 where you live Clifford)  What temp should my gun read? How much of a safe veriance can I have?    Thanks again everyone for you replies
       Larry B
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Jon
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« Reply #19 on: November 13, 2013, 04:33:50 AM »

Larry,

I use the tire pressure charts for my inflation pressures. So my pressures depend on what each axle is carrying as has been discussed.

At a rest area after several hours of driving I have found that my tires, despite varying pressures, are within a few degrees of one another around the entire coach. I don't care what the temperature of the tires is because that varies depending on the speed I am driving and the ambient temperature.

On an 80 degree day I would not be surprised to see all my tires around 135 degrees measured at the center of the tread on each wheel. There is usually less than 5 degrees spread between the temperatures. Any temps not in line with the others is usually going to be higher, and it is usually an indication of low tire pressure such as from a slow leak.

I also will shoot the temps at the center of the wheel near the lugs. I look for consistency there also and an unusual temperature on one wheel is usually a reason to investigate further, as it might indicate dry bearings or dragging brakes. They also tend to be consistent.
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Jon

Current coach 2006 Prevost, Liberty conversion
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sledhead
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« Reply #20 on: November 13, 2013, 04:50:27 AM »

Like Jon said     I try to check ever time I pull over at a rest stop when on a trip . I do the toad as well only takes a few minutes .      dave
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1990 mci 102c  6v92 ta ht740  kit,living room slide . home base huntsville ontario canada
gus
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« Reply #21 on: November 13, 2013, 12:12:53 PM »

I always thought the outside edge of the outside dual wore the most? It scrubs when turning because it travels farther at the same rpm than the inside, especially on city streets.

Never heard the road crown theory before?

I suspect that the very aggressive tread pattern is the problem - it looks like a log truck tire!

I find in hot weather that the sunny side tires are considerably warmer than the shady side ones, mostly when driving E/W.
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PD4107-152
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Ash Flat, AR
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