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Author Topic: typical conversion component costs?  (Read 6906 times)
Jnbroadbent
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« Reply #90 on: January 24, 2014, 06:41:37 AM »

If you keep a look out, you can get materials for really cheap on Craigslist.

For example, I bought ~1000sq ft of 2" rigid insulation for $120.

I've seen 30+ sheets of 1/2"-3/4" ply go for $3-5 bucks a sheet. I keep missing out on those...
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Jon
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Jacksonville Fl
luvrbus
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« Reply #91 on: January 24, 2014, 06:46:57 AM »

Where did he go ?
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muldoonman
1991 Prevost 8V92TA
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« Reply #92 on: January 24, 2014, 07:17:58 AM »

Where did he go ?
Aliens?
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bansil
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« Reply #93 on: January 24, 2014, 08:47:35 AM »

Aliens?
Shocked
Shiat , for real!
.
Dang I made Popcorn late...turned out to be wifeys kettle corn, crap...threw it to the cats and made more;
LA natriala~

Damn okay it,s plain and no salt!

Did I say something to offend?

Nagh...was'nt me so....

Should we add purple sea shells to the sink handles?

 Kiss

It takes longer to warm bus up to do the work I wanna do...reckon
, I'll turn another heater on and head to the beer store ta-ta
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Doug
Mnt City TN
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« Reply #94 on: January 26, 2014, 09:59:39 PM »

I'm back.

This is my first time on the forum/board, no I don't have any previous identities.

Over the years I have learned to temper my fascinations and desires against the true costs. For example, after investigation, I resisted the urge to buy an Audi S8 just outside of warranty. Cool car, but even well taken care of, they seem to be a money pit.

You are right that it seems incongruous to make a tin tent out of an H3-40. What appealed to me was the ultra-tall cargo bins, for several reasons which are not important here. Don't have those on a skoolie.

In conclusion, my desires have been tempered. I will look for a finished conversion, but even then only get one if the value is good. I've bought many things in my life including several very sporty cars used, and got them at a good enough price that I was able to resell 4-5 years later at profit (break even when including maintenance). I'd like a bus, but I don't have so much disposable income at this point to throw money into a pit.

A Prevost H is still not out of the question. I think I'm less concerned right now with the conversion systems costs than the rehab/maintenance costs on the H. The older ones I was looking at, seems things like control boxes for the trans are no longer made (but a company will rehab your old one for $1000 I think). I want to get my head around those costs, knowing when might be a better cutoff in terms of model year, etc. And in that regard, I think Boomer's post on that subject was good advice. But of course, those are still going for over $50k. I'll continue to look and learn. If I get a place that has room for it, and stumble across a good year H in relatively good shape for less than $20k (not likely, but stranger things have happened), I'll probably buy it just to futz around with it and work on it for the enjoyment of it. I'll just make sure the mechanicals are sound before pulling the seats out, because once I do that, I'm committed.
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busproject
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« Reply #95 on: January 26, 2014, 10:03:00 PM »

Oh and thanks all for the input, much appreciated.
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Jon
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« Reply #96 on: January 27, 2014, 05:06:03 AM »

I have been a long time owner of Prevost coaches. The first I had for 15 years and I put about 250,000 miles on it. I put about 100,000 on the second. So far about 20,000 on my current one. All were bought used.

Even if you get a "deal" I can almost bet the farm you will never recover your money. If you add in what it really costs to maintain one you will not come close to break even. As long as you approach the acquisition of an H3 knowing a lot of money will be going down the drain you will be a happy camper. I suspect the early models with the 8V92 are going to sell for far below their cost to reproduce. The key to buying one has to be to avoid buying one with a lot of stuff broke from a seller who tries to tell you it is a simple repair. If it was simple (or inexpensive) he would have fixed it. A coach with an accumulation of small defects is one to run away from because you can be sure it was not maintained properly. As was shown on a post a few weeks ago just failing to change and maintain the coolant cost an owner a new engine.

I have learned due to the multiple systems and complexity to keep detailed logs of all maintenance and if they are not available when I buy the coach to zero everything out including fluids, filters, belts, air dryer, air bags, brake chambers, leveling valves, etc. Time consuming and expensive but then I start with a virtually new coach and can enjoy a lot of trouble free miles and years. I cannot handle surprises when on the road so I would rather spend the money on preventive maintenance than on a tow truck.
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Jon

Current coach 2006 Prevost, Liberty conversion
Knoxville, TN
lvmci
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« Reply #97 on: January 27, 2014, 06:18:34 AM »

 surprises when on the road, so I would rather spend the money on preventive maintenance than on a tow truck.
[/quote]
Great way to put it, Jon,  lvmci...
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MCI5A 8V71 Allison MT643
Jon
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« Reply #98 on: January 27, 2014, 09:25:06 AM »

surprises when on the road, so I would rather spend the money on preventive maintenance than on a tow truck.

Great way to put it, Jon,  lvmci...

Comes from flying for business for so many years. Far better to fix it before it breaks than to wait til it breaks and wished you'd fixed it.
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Jon

Current coach 2006 Prevost, Liberty conversion
Knoxville, TN
RJ
Former Giant Greenbrier Owner
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« Reply #99 on: January 27, 2014, 10:57:24 AM »

Bob -

You mentioned in an earlier post about wanting the larger bays for your bikes.

Human-powered or gasoline-powered?

Bicycles are not a problem if you don't mind laying them on their side - regardless of coach make/model.

Motorcycles, OTOH, are a different challenge.  Part of that challenge is the tunnel that runs down the center of the coach, which houses heater/defroster coolant lines, A/C freon lines and electric conduits, thus not easily removed.  That makes the bikes harder to store cross-ways in the bay if they're taller.  Most bikes are also longer than the bay, so mounting them parallel to the sides of the coach gets thwarted.  You can't cut away the bulkhead between the bays to accommodate the length, because the bulkhead adds torsional rigidity to the chassis.

Now you know why the majority of folk who are into motorcycles pull an enclosed trailer behind their bus conversion.

With the current depressed market, even a good Haulmark or Wells Cargo trailer with a drop tailgate can be had very reasonably with a little shopping around.

FYI, the GMC PD4905s actually have larger baggage bays than an H3 Prevost, two fewer tires and a longer wheelbase.  There are several of those available right now with automatics for quite a bit less than a Prevost.  You might consider one of these as a "starter coach" to see if this is really the lifestyle for you.  In today's market, GMs are about the only coach you could just about recoup your purchase price, less maintenance.  You'd still take a hit, just not as severe.

Here's a couple examples of the 4905:

http://www.sellabus.com/blake.html
http://www.sellabus.com/rowsell_77gm.html

Just some additional food for thought.

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink
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RJ Long
PD4106-2784 No More
Fresno CA
Jeremy
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« Reply #100 on: January 27, 2014, 12:27:07 PM »

I realise that this probably doesn't help much - but for pure height you can't beat the bays in a double-decker coach:



Jeremy
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luvrbus
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« Reply #101 on: January 27, 2014, 01:00:02 PM »

Don't the Van Hools have the largest bays of any bus ?
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RJ
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« Reply #102 on: January 27, 2014, 09:51:25 PM »

Don't the Van Hools have the largest bays of any bus ?

They might. . . but who wants a POS??
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RJ Long
PD4106-2784 No More
Fresno CA
lvmci
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« Reply #103 on: January 28, 2014, 04:53:02 AM »

Hi buspj, have you looked at the mci's with a wheel chair lift ? You might be able to adapt and beefup that mechanism to fit a motorcycle, I've lomg thought. Theres one for sale in palm springs on craigslist. Mike, the previous owner of busconversions, had a mci custom fitted with a set of doors on the side that was beefed up to display medical machinery,  you might be able to rigup a lift like for the top of my T-bird, that would crank up into a pocket garage.Have you seen the motorcycle lifts mounted to the rear? those are quite common, but you need a bus with a frame, I think, I'm suggesting there might be other solutions, only limited by your imagination, lvmci...
« Last Edit: January 28, 2014, 04:55:22 AM by lvmci » Logged

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luvrbus
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« Reply #104 on: January 28, 2014, 04:59:43 AM »

Just another option for him RJ,Northwest Bus in Vegas has a hella of buy on a Neoplan Metroliner extra clean with a ISM and Allison that replaced the 6v92 it was installed in 2003 has 153,000 miles has electrical problems on the bus for 9 grand you cannot buy the ISM and B500 for that price and it is a clean west coast bus  

He can look beyond Prevost,GM,Eagle and MCI the BlueBird intercity coach is a nice bus also they are all going to cost to maintain  

These old bus parts are getting hard to find even Luke is running out
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