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Author Topic: back up air compressor  (Read 868 times)
mikke60
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« on: January 19, 2014, 12:33:09 PM »

what are people using for back up air comp. for startups and maintaining air for leveling?
thanks ,mike
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bevans6
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« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2014, 01:01:17 PM »

I've been using a little oil-less hot-dog compressor but it's noisy and slow.  I put a new head on my shop compressor this fall, and I am thinking of putting the old Webster head in a compartment and wiring/plumbing it in permanently.  I can run it real slow, put a big air filter on it and it should be pretty quiet.  I might put it in the engine bay where the old AC compressor was.  Only problem is it needs a real 1 hp motor even if I run it slow.

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
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Iceni John
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« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2014, 01:46:57 PM »

I have a small twin-tank generic el-cheapo oil-type compressor, the sort you see sold under a variety of names.   I got mine from Harbor Fright on sale for about $70.   It's noisy, but it works well for occasional non-critical use.   I plumbed it into the bus's accessories air system, with a simple filter to trap moisture and with its own remote tank drain.   I've installed three air outlets around the bus for airing tires and using small air tools, and this little compressor works fine for that.   By connecting an air hose to the wet tank's drain I can also air up the entire bus in less than ten minutes.   So far, so good.

John
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1990 Crown 2R-40N-552:  6V92TAC, DDEC II, HT740, Jake.      Hecho en Chino.     
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Dave5Cs
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« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2014, 06:18:52 PM »

Campbell Hausfeld twin stacked tanks 2HRP. Wire a plug with a switch next to it just keep it turned on and plugged in. Flip a switch when I need it. Have a 50 foot hose attached. Grin
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TomC
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« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2014, 09:31:45 PM »

Check out californiaairtools.com ultra quiet oil less air compressor. When I get the truck done, I'll buy the 4620A. Check out the videos comparison of other compressors-its truly amazing the noise difference. Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
luvrbus
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« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2014, 04:29:06 AM »

If you can check around and find a Jun/Air at reasonable price that is the way to go that is what most Prevost converters used super quite,compact and will last forever I got lucky and bought one in OR a few years back for 50 bucks  

If you want a DC compressor check around for the compressor from a H1 Hummer those are nice and quite while doing a good job also the cheap ones can be made to run quieter by installing a couple of 90 bends in the intake fwiw
« Last Edit: January 20, 2014, 04:56:04 AM by luvrbus » Logged

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wagwar
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« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2014, 02:51:14 PM »

I installed a Makita MAC700 oiled compressor in the old A/C compressor location in the engine compartment of my mc9. It is small, light and quiet. When we get ready to roll at a campsite, it only takes about 10 minutes for that little compressor to air the bus up. You can also adjust the pressure (don't tell) so that you can use it to inflate a low tire in a pinch. I have been very pleased with the performance and reliability.
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Barn Owl
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« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2014, 05:59:34 PM »

A Gast Compressor would work, or one of similar design. Not cheep, though I found one for $50 and let it get away. Compact, silent, industrial machine. I think Fortravel might have used them on their coaches. That is where I saw one first.
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