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Author Topic: Pulling a 20 or 24 foot trailer  (Read 3381 times)
bevans6
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« Reply #30 on: February 27, 2014, 04:15:29 PM »

Idaho measures vehicle length like this:  https://itd.idaho.gov/dmv/poe/LegalWidthHeightLength.htm  Maximum length of any combination is 75 feet, mostly, except for saddlemount vehicles, and I have no idea what they are.

If some one was pulling three 53' trailers, he was illegal by a long shot.  Which just goes to prove that just because you do something and don't get arrested doesn't mean you didn't break the law.  Bonnie and Clyde did a bunch of stuff and never got arrested, but they sure did break the law...

Brian
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georgemci102a2
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« Reply #31 on: February 27, 2014, 05:45:05 PM »

Brian, pulling triple 53 foot trailers isnt something ya see often,Ive seen them in the upper mid west and Colorado,and even as far south as south Texas.Ive never pulled a triple but have the endorsment on my CDL to pull them.Have pulled double pups(wiggle wagons) from Georgia to California in a team of 2 for several years with estes and gi trucking (12 to 14 thousand miles every 8 days) burned out now Sad...George.
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1988 mci 102a2/6v92ta/Grovetown,Ga.
usbusin
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« Reply #32 on: February 27, 2014, 05:59:05 PM »

(12 to 14 thousand miles every 8 days)

How is this possible?  1500 to 1750 miles per day?

How many drivers?

Just curious.

GaryD
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Gary D

USBUSIN was our 1960 PD4104 for 16 years Ustruckin' is our 2001 Freightliner truck conversion
georgemci102a2
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« Reply #33 on: February 27, 2014, 06:16:39 PM »

Gary,working the logbook and using a calculator and notebook,logging 2 miles below the speed limit,letting the logbook catch up etc,knowing when scales,to include banning ca is closed etc,etc,i cn go on ,and on. thats why i said next door that there is a different between steering wheel holders and truck drivers. George
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1988 mci 102a2/6v92ta/Grovetown,Ga.
georgemci102a2
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« Reply #34 on: February 27, 2014, 06:18:26 PM »

Ps 2 drivers with good calculator skills.
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1988 mci 102a2/6v92ta/Grovetown,Ga.
oldmansax
Tom & Phyllis
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« Reply #35 on: February 27, 2014, 07:14:39 PM »

Have pulled double pups(wiggle wagons) from Georgia to California in a team of 2 for several years with estes and gi trucking (12 to 14 thousand miles every 8 days) burned out now Sad...George.

12,000 miles in 8 days = 1500 miles /day = 62.5 MPH average every 24 hours for 8 days.

14,000 miles in 8 days = 1750 miles /day = 72.9 MPH average every 24 hours for 8 days.

These figures do not include any down time for stop lights, scales, fuel, meals, changing drivers, loading, unloading, drop & hook trailer swaps, flat tires, or any thing at all other than keeping the truck at 62.5/72.9 MPH every hour of every day for at least 8 days.

I drove for 30+ years. My trucks mostly. Hauled mostly refrigerated stuff.... produce, seafood, meat, fresh & frozen, Mexico to P.E.I and East Coast to West Coast.  Had  a bunch of pretty nice trucks after I made a little money. Loved power. Had a twin turbo V12, KTA 600, and some others. The one I liked the most was a Marmon. It has a 1693 Cat with a 5x4. Loved that truck. Too durn heavy to make any money with though. Ran double for a while with my Dad and then a couple of my other relatives. Never could sleep behind someone not related. Lots of crazy folks out there that thought they could drive without tearing up something.

Point is, I always figured to average about 50 MPH. I have done better for a short time, 2 days, maybe 3; but something always brought my AVERAGE back down to 50.

You, Sir, are one heck of a driver, especially driving an Estes truck. I never saw one of those that could stay within radio range of me....... when we finally got to using radios.

My hat is off to you.

TOM
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'82 BlueBird WanderLodge PT40 being rebuilt
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georgemci102a2
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« Reply #36 on: February 27, 2014, 09:54:06 PM »

Tom,in no way a heck of a driver(team),its all in the way ya keep the books and log them,and turn them in to the log book office.Did not drive for Estes etc only pulled many of there trailers along with others.I also like the cb radios with the long range,spent $$$. Only had one nice large car,and then went to International double bunk truck and company leased them for 10 months each from new to trade in because of the time limit allowed between east and west coast for the estes,gi trucking, hauling home depo returnes to California. finished now, house paid for and living the bus nut life now Smiley....George
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bevans6
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« Reply #37 on: February 28, 2014, 02:58:08 AM »

I gotta apologize, the link I posted earlier seems wrong or outdated.  This link says triple trailers are allowed in Idaho, and many western states.  I confess I haven't driven out west so I've never seen one.  Double 53' trailers got approved in Canada a while ago, but only on the main highways and they have a lower speed limit.  Here is the new link I found:  http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/2006_fcvt_fotw411.html

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
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1978 Lola T440 Formula Ford
1972 NTM MK-4 B/SR
wildbob24
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« Reply #38 on: February 28, 2014, 06:53:59 AM »

except for saddlemount vehicles, and I have no idea what they are.

Brian

Brian,

Saddlemount, also called decking, are those rigs you see with the lead tractor pulling 3 or 4 trucks behind it with their noses in the air and their rear axles on the ground. The saddle clamps to the front axle and mounts on the 5th wheel of the truck in front. You have to have a double/triples endorsement to drive them.

Bob
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usbusin
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« Reply #39 on: February 28, 2014, 07:25:11 AM »

12,000 miles in 8 days = 1500 miles /day = 62.5 MPH average every 24 hours for 8 days.

14,000 miles in 8 days = 1750 miles /day = 72.9 MPH average every 24 hours for 8 days.


I don't see how this is remotely possible, cooking the books or not.  50 mph average is pretty close to real world driving.
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Gary D

USBUSIN was our 1960 PD4104 for 16 years Ustruckin' is our 2001 Freightliner truck conversion
luvrbus
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« Reply #40 on: February 28, 2014, 07:35:32 AM »

Triples have been allowed in Idaho for long time,during the potatoes and sugar beet harvest I have always saw triples since the late 80's you should see the weight those guys carry I once saw a weight ticket at the beet plant in Napa Idaho the guy was @ 214,000 lbs with 3 trailers and the scale guy told me he was a little on the lite side lol 

good luck
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oldmansax
Tom & Phyllis
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« Reply #41 on: February 28, 2014, 12:10:35 PM »

12,000 miles in 8 days = 1500 miles /day = 62.5 MPH average every 24 hours for 8 days.

14,000 miles in 8 days = 1750 miles /day = 72.9 MPH average every 24 hours for 8 days.


I don't see how this is remotely possible, cooking the books or not.  50 mph average is pretty close to real world driving.

Me neither but, then again, I never kept a log book unless I was on a temporary lease to a company. Just paid the fine if I got caught.

TOM
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belfert
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« Reply #42 on: February 28, 2014, 12:19:53 PM »

I thought doubles and triples are usually smaller trailers like the 28 footers?  I don't recall ever seeing double or triple 53 footers, but I don't spend much time out west either.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #43 on: March 05, 2014, 03:38:11 PM »

I have towed a 24 ft trailer with a 4106 and mc8 for 8 full-time years.  I have been to Alaska 4 times towing the trailer.  Remember that the trailer doesn't have air suspension or air ride seats.  The baby blazer walked  a little and some hanging items got their freedom.  No real problems.  3 other bus friends also run 24 ft trailers and have lots of crap inside. 

Big advantage is you can back up a trailer while a towed rig, not so much.  Also vehicles stay safe and clean and away from prying eyes. A trailer can also be used as a spare bedroom or puzzle room.   Also a good place for your full size chest freezer, welders drill press etc.  A trailer is another good location for large solar banks.

In smaller rv parks I have had to park the trailer in a storage place but no additional charge.  I t was easy to do, just unload blazer and use it to jockey trailer.

A good strong hitch is a concern but none of our group has had any problems.
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harleyman_1000
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« Reply #44 on: March 19, 2014, 05:28:59 PM »

We tow a 30 foot trailer behind our 1955 PD4501 Scenicruiser.   Total length bumper to trailer door is 77 feet.  Legal length in Ohio is 65 feet, but I use a 5th wheel hitch mounted in a regular hitch box on the bus and that qualifies as a stinger steered transporter, which allows me to go to 75 feet +/- 5 feet overhang at each end.   
What I have found is the laws are basically for commercial vehicles, and if you are not going to be conducting any interstate commerce you will probaly be left alone.   With a lettered race trailer, we get stopped fairly often for checks even though we are non commercial.   I have a letter from the Ohio DMV stating my total length compled with Ohio law, and I keep copies of the commercial regs with me as it is rare that an officer stopping me knows about the differences betwen commercail and non commercial regs.
As far as towing behind a GM, we did a lot of strengthening of the cradle, and adding support braces across the engine bay, but I am still concerned about the impact on the rear of the bus, as my tongue weight can exceed 3,000 lbs under normal normal drive loads.   I am in the process of building a device like the "Trailer Toad" to take the hitch weight off the back of the bus.  Let me know if you would like more detials.
Dave
PD4501-304


Yes please give me more information.
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Scott 
St.Louis Missouri

1958 GM 4104 Extended 2 feet, with a 6v92 and 5 speed automatic

http://s783.photobucket.com/user/harleyman_1000/library/Gm4104%20bus?sort=3&page=1
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