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Author Topic: bus towing charges/options  (Read 2056 times)
oldfordlover36
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« on: June 12, 2014, 09:02:06 PM »

Hi I am new to the forum and I have a question.  I am looking at a salvage bus to convert but it would have to be towed about 1000 miles.  Any input on an amount I know it won't be cheap!  Also any suggestions on who would be best to tow it would be appreciated.  Thanks in advance.
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lvmci
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« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2014, 09:18:04 PM »

hi OldFord, we need more info, what bus manufacturer and year,   standard or auto, rear or front engine, how long (35, 40'?), 1 rear axle or 2 or tag, do  you have insurance from fmca, AAA, or others, are you going over mountains, also tell us where you are and where its coming from,  do you think the drive shaft can be, disconnected?  The guys with experience will then chime in, , I used a landall, which ended up working best for my 35' 66 MCI5A auto with one rear axle, just in one valley, lvmci...
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Mci 102C3 8V92, Allison 4 speed 740
Formally MCI5A 8V71 Allison MT643
Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2014, 09:52:33 PM »

  Hi I am new to the forum and I have a question.  I am looking at a salvage bus to convert but it would have to be towed about 1000 miles.  Any input on an amount I know it won't be cheap!  Also any suggestions on who would be best to tow it would be appreciated.  Thanks in advance. 

    I know one guy who had a bus (non-runner) delivered from San Francisco area to Charlotte NC for about $5500 (on a LandAll).  Took him 2-3 weeks of looking at bids to get that rate.  I've also seen a quote "$250 to hook up, $4 a mile (total tow truck mileage)" but I think that's 24-hour/"do it now" roadside recovery rate.  Don't take the first quote you get.
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
scanzel
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« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2014, 02:46:37 AM »

Something to look at is the cost of the bus/vehicle worth the cost of having it brought 1000 miles. Even if the vehicle is free is it worth the delivery cost ? I would assume that you have already looked at this vehicle and it is what you want.
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Steve Canzellarini
Berlin, CT
1989 Prevost XL
sparkplug188
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« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2014, 05:51:06 AM »

How much time and money is needed to make a salvage bus roadworthy?  It cost me two years and almost as much money as a bus in good condition to get my salvage bus roadworthy.  Seriously consider starting with a shell that is in the best condition possible-- you will thank yourself later.
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DriverGT5
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« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2014, 06:04:54 AM »

How much time and money is needed to make a salvage bus roadworthy?  It cost me two years and almost as much money as a bus in good condition to get my salvage bus roadworthy.  Seriously consider starting with a shell that is in the best condition possible-- you will thank yourself later.

Agreed. Spending a few thousand dollars extra upfront can save 6 months of work. I have also found that the longer a project goes on and the bigger the total task, the less likely it is to get finished. It's really hard to wake up and start working on something that's been going on for two years.

Much easier to have something basically running and do little projects from time to time.

When I was younger and broker I always went for the screaming deal and put in the sweat equity. Now that I'm older and have slightly more money I have never once regretted spending a little more upfront. Especially on vehicles.
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1968 Eagle Series 05 - 7616
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Jon
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« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2014, 07:17:12 AM »

With the current pricing of professionally converted Prevost motor homes with 20 to 25 years of age on them there is no worse decision than to start with an old seated coach that has to be towed home. I get the concept of "creating" a coach. I get the satisfaction of starting from scratch, but for the die hards that want to do that buy that under loved 2 cycle powered professional Prevost conversion and gut it and start all over. At the very least you will have every component needed to make a first class motor home on a commercial bus chassis and your cost will not even approach what it takes to buy all the parts separately.

Even sweat equity has a cost because unless someone's mission is just the building and not the enjoyment of the final product, every hour of "sweat equity" is an hour taken away from the family enjoying the coach, which I presume was the intent in the first place.

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Jon

Current coach 2006 Prevost, Liberty conversion
Knoxville, TN
robertglines1
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« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2014, 05:54:28 PM »

The Build!!  I wrote a heated response to the last Prevost entry.  I do not agree at all.. I erased it..  I would not do that on a site that is dominated by Prevost factory conversions..  How many years behind are the pro on HVAC and just recently doing led..  Can't buy class or pride---throw money at it all day long...Bob
« Last Edit: June 13, 2014, 06:01:44 PM by robertglines1 » Logged

Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
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« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2014, 06:10:59 PM »

Looks like you got some good advise from what I can see.

I would say the tow bill would be outrageous + the fact that you will need to do a good amount of work. It may not look like a lot of work, but believe me, once you start into it you will find out that other changes will need to be made while you are doing you re fit or you need to make changes for upgrades......meaning once you open the can up, you will always find something that will need to be addressed if you want to do it right.

We are refitting ours and I am finding things I did not even think about. Mind you, these are not bad things, but things that should be corrected before we button it back up.

Good luck with your search......be sure to buy something you can drive home:)

All the best
Mike
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Mike and Lori
Sunny Phoenix Arizona
"1973 MCI MC-7 Challenger"


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oldfordlover36
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« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2014, 08:19:50 PM »

Thanks for all the input.  I am realizing my notion of a salvage bus is overwhelming.   I have built alot of salvage trucks and they do always require more time effort and capital than planned that coupled with a motorhome conversion would really be a project!  I just really like j4500 mcis and don't want to spend 300k on one lol.  I will prob scrap this idea and keep looking for a   n already converted bus that maby needs some tlc, finishing, or remodel.  Anyone have any projects they want to sell or know of any?  Thanks again for the input.  I can tell already this is a helpful forum
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oldfordlover36
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« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2014, 08:30:01 PM »

Ok I will add that I am looking locally at a 1990 102c3 with a l10 and a 5 speed that the interior has been removed on seller wants 10k for it.  Also a 1995 vanhool 840 with m11 for 12500.  I won a 1994 dl3 with d4500 front and rear caps on ebay last week but the seller sold it on craigs before I won the auction!!!  I just don't know what to do.  I am a self employed mechanic and have remodeled several homes so I have the ability to do a conversion just not sure if I want another project to consume my life just yet.  I apoligise for the lack of direction just really appreciate the advice of fellow bus lovers.
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lvmci
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« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2014, 08:58:53 PM »

Hi oldford, drive as many as you can, and look over even more, some pro and home conversions, the more you look at the more things you recognize,  more easily, where are you at? 45 ft is quite long do you intend on staying in rv parks? Lvmci...
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Mci 102C3 8V92, Allison 4 speed 740
Formally MCI5A 8V71 Allison MT643
oldfordlover36
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« Reply #12 on: June 14, 2014, 06:50:26 PM »

Lvmci
I am in wisconsin and I have heard the 45 footers are more difficult to find campgrounds to stay at.  I will keep looking at them.  I have another 1993 102c3 to look at tomorrow will report on how it goes.
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Dave5Cs
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« Reply #13 on: June 14, 2014, 07:08:48 PM »

1993 MCI 102c3 would be my first choice. Extra head height with out doing a roof raise. Wider at 102" and is the best of the old coaches IHO in looks. Merl Haggard uses one as do many of the music people. a lot of them were never in people hauling service but were started as a converters shell. All that said I would stay away from the Van Howels (Hool) They can have lots of hidden rust as well as having a hard time finding parts. I believe they also have weird rear Bolt patterns on the wheels as do Neoplan type. HTH

Dave5Cs
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luvrbus
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« Reply #14 on: June 14, 2014, 07:57:48 PM »

The later Van Hools are good buses no rusting the older ones were bad news ,the new Cx45 IMO is the sharpest looking bus on the road with plenty of power from the DD13 or the Cummins ISX
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