Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
October 30, 2014, 11:55:56 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: You will not have to go out in the rain, sleet, hail, or snow to retrieve it.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 [2] 3  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How tall is your bus?  (Read 1675 times)
sledhead
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 345





Ignore
« Reply #15 on: June 24, 2014, 09:25:14 AM »

143 " to the tip of the cell phone ant. booster and 6 " less to the roof wart

6' 4 " inside

dave
Logged

1990 mci 102c  6v92 ta ht740  kit,living room slide . home base huntsville ontario canada
tomhamrick
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 385




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: June 24, 2014, 01:36:10 PM »

Ours is 13' 3" to the top of the A/C units. 12' 8" to the top of the roof and 86" head room inside.
Logged

Tom Hamrick
1991 Prevost H3-40 VIP
1981 Eagle 10
Forest City, NC
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12798




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: June 24, 2014, 03:20:30 PM »

We looked at a H-45 that was 13 ft to the top with no AC on the roof it had 8ft of head room inside we saw a X that 11.2 to the top of roof and had 7.5 of head room on the inside go figure 
Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
Lin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4573

1965 MC-5a




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: June 24, 2014, 04:41:55 PM »

"When I first floated the idea of converting a low floor on this and another forum, some said it couldn't be done."

Lostranger- I am a bit surprised by that statement.  Can you reference the thread so that I could see what their reasoning was?
Logged

You don't have to believe everything you think.
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1894


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #19 on: June 24, 2014, 05:01:24 PM »

I've always imagined that low-floor transists would be extremely easy to convert given that they're just big rectangular boxes on wheels - simple vertical sides, loads of headroom - easy. And dirt cheap to buy too. They are make very attractive candidates if you can get around the fact they don't have bays and are generally designed for short distance and low speed use rather than long-distance travel

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
Oonrahnjay
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1519





Ignore
« Reply #20 on: June 24, 2014, 05:10:40 PM »

  I've always imagined that low-floor transists would be extremely easy to convert given that they're just big rectangular boxes on wheels - simple vertical sides, loads of headroom - easy. And dirt cheap to buy too. They are make very attractive candidates if you can get around the fact they don't have bays and are generally designed for short distance and low speed use rather than long-distance travel     Jeremy 

     Yes, it takes a bit of creativity to get around the issues of bays (although Gary Throneberry "Garhawk" built some underfloor storage into his RTS that was about as big as bays and had slide-out rails to make it convenient, too) but it can be done.  I think that in years past, many N American transits were built with low gearing/low speed but American cities have sprawled so much that many transits are designed and spec'ed as 'regional' buses and have to be capable of open road commuting driving.  I don't have a lot of experience but I think that many now are fully road-speed worthy.
     But I do absolutely know that a Daimler Fleetline with a Leyland O-680 engine was geared for 38 MPH.  DAMHIK ...   Shocked

BH  NC  USA
Logged

Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1894


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #21 on: June 24, 2014, 05:36:52 PM »

I wonder about the ride quality, noise, handling etc, as well as the speed itself - especially on low-floor buses with the way their suspension and running gear is squeezed into the smallest of spaces. I've been reading a lot of modern bus magazines recently, and the manufacturers all promote their low-floor models by showing-off about how much side-to-side width there is between the wheel arches - in other words, the mechanical arrangements suffer because of the desire for a low and flat floor.

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12798




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: June 24, 2014, 05:49:20 PM »

I don't see that bus any harder to convert than the RTS myself both are a challenge but very do able 
Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
Oonrahnjay
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1519





Ignore
« Reply #23 on: June 25, 2014, 04:30:43 AM »

  I wonder about the ride quality, noise, handling etc, as well as the speed itself - especially on low-floor buses with the way their suspension and running gear is squeezed into the smallest of spaces. I've been reading a lot of modern bus magazines recently, and the manufacturers all promote their low-floor models by showing-off about how much side-to-side width there is between the wheel arches - in other words, the mechanical arrangements suffer because of the desire for a low and flat floor.
Jeremy 

     That may be an issue - I suppose that time will tell.  The low-floor Gillig buses have the air bag suspension members spread out and they are duplicated; two smaller ones where you'd expect one larger one.  Whether this is an advantage, spreadiing the load and making the ride better, or a disadvantage with needless complication, I'm not sure.  But it certainly works well and my take on it right now is not "good or bad" but just "different".  (And this is from a confirmed "Keep It Simple" adherent.)
Logged

Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
Lostranger
Sophia
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 180


Gillig Low Floor


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #24 on: June 25, 2014, 05:28:38 AM »

Our Gillig rides and drives like a dream. Plenty of speed and plenty of power for us, but we do not use a toad. I think it would still be okay.

Bruce mentioned the eight airbag suspension. They did something right. I did not know until after purchase that our bus also has a small ring and pinion. They made up final gearing by using planetary gears in the hubs. Some might call that cramming stuff in, but I think of it as an elegant solution for keeping the floor close to the road.

On top of all that, the kneel feature dumps air at both ends rather than just the front like our Flxible Metro. I don't know if Gillig transits do the same, but our bus was a shuttle and did not have a front door. A front-only kneel would be silly. Net effect is that I pull into a spot, hit the kneel switch, and that first step becomes even shorter.

I can't speak for other low floor busses, but I love this one.

Jim in NC

P.S. Just went back and found this:

Title: Re: Gillig Low Floor Conversions
Post by: Geoff on November 10, 2012, 04:05:45 PM
I've been in a few low floor buses and I purposely looked at the floors and interior build and quickly decided that it was not a good candidate for a serious bus conversion.  Like you said: "inherent design problems".

P.P.S. I had been talking about design problems specific to our Flxible Metro
Logged

Jim Huskins
Marion, NC
1999 Gillig H2000LF
Yes Virginia,
You CAN convert a low floor.
Oonrahnjay
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1519





Ignore
« Reply #25 on: June 25, 2014, 06:03:05 AM »

  ...  Bruce mentioned the eight airbag suspension. They did something right. I did not know until after purchase that our bus also has a small ring and pinion. They made up final gearing by using planetary gears in the hubs. Some might call that cramming stuff in, but I think of it as an elegant solution for keeping the floor close to the road.  ... 

     Yeah, the planetary diff rear end is very similar to the one originally installed in my Daimler bus -- except 450 pounds lighter and with a 4000 pound GAWR higher.  In fact, since the diff is nice and compact and the rear air bag suspension is so good and the engine and transmission is mounted on a ladder-like subframe, you could even just drop the rear axle, suspension, B400R transmission, and Cumming ISC engine out of a front-end-crashed Gillig and graft it right under a British double decker bus and have all-N American engine, transmission, and rear axle with a cruise speed (2 overdrive) of 65MPH -- and save ~2000 pounds hanging off behind the rear axle.  Not that I'd do anything like that, of course    Wink Grin 

BH   NC   USA
Logged

Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

(New Email -- brucebearnc@ (theGoogle gmail place) .com)
Lostranger
Sophia
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 180


Gillig Low Floor


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #26 on: June 25, 2014, 06:36:59 AM »

You could even just drop the rear axle, suspension, B400R transmission, and Cumming ISC engine out of a front-end-crashed Gillig and graft it right under a British double decker bus....  Not that I'd do anything like that, of course    Wink Grin 

Come on, Bruce. Take a walk on the wild side....
Logged

Jim Huskins
Marion, NC
1999 Gillig H2000LF
Yes Virginia,
You CAN convert a low floor.
seaton@mta
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 60




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: June 25, 2014, 07:25:40 AM »

Jim,

Would love to see pix of interior.  Your Gillig looks a lot different than the low-floors run in transit service in NYC. In fact, the exterior of your bus is a lot better looking.

- Seaton

NY and NC
Logged
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12798




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: June 25, 2014, 07:52:55 AM »

Bad thing about the planetary gear system is the bearing load one has to stay on top of it or it will run into big bucks,it is used in a lot of off road equipment like loaders and scrapers 

I would cringe when the mechanic would tell me a Cat loader was down you could count on 10k or more for each wheel in just parts that gear system to me on bus I would pass on JMO
Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
Lin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4573

1965 MC-5a




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: June 25, 2014, 08:32:20 AM »

My reason for asking the question was I did not see how someone could say that such a bus could not be converted.  Yes, different formats offer different challenges, and some are easier or more practical then others for various reasons, but none are impossible.  As once mentioned, I knew a guy that lived in his old Fiat and even had a bed and cook stove in it!  Calling a particular format unsuitable is not the same as saying it can not be done.
Logged

You don't have to believe everything you think.
Pages: 1 [2] 3  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!