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Author Topic: Convert oil filled hubs to grease  (Read 1936 times)
bevans6
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« Reply #15 on: June 30, 2014, 04:14:20 AM »

here are pics.  Having a 5C this is a front wheel.

Brian
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« Reply #16 on: June 30, 2014, 06:32:50 AM »

I have a video and photos of the hub removal process.  It's on a GM bus, but I suspect it's the same type of heavy duty truck/bus hub.   It will show you what to expect at least.   I'm not sure if I have a video or the reassembly or not but just follow the book for bearing tightness and torque settings and it's pretty easy.    20-30 min job.  It's a maybe 2-3 on the 10 scale of difficulty.  Hardest part is lifting the heavy hub.  No specialty tools required. 


http://busgreasemonkey.com/index.php?p=/discussion/comment/3902#Comment_3902
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chessie4905
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« Reply #17 on: July 01, 2014, 05:23:02 PM »

   What happens when a front or rear hub oil seal leaks?................ One hell of a mess and poor braking on that wheel. You can have them for our use. Not enough fuel savings for the trouble. 2EHO
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Scott Bennett
Scott & Heather MCI-9
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« Reply #18 on: July 02, 2014, 05:46:38 AM »

Thanks Brian and Scott. Brian, I didn't see the pics???

Scott, I am going to keep my oiled hubs. Didn't really know they were superior in some ways/less maintenance. Although when they leak, it is a nasty mess. BTW, I haven't forgotten about your great help and advice on my low power issue. I have turned my attention to my blow radiator at the moment. I took the bus for it's first test drive of the year a week ago to see if any fiddling I did fixed the issue. It didn't so I'm back to the table. Anyway, I'll be in touch Smiley
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Scott & Heather
1984 MCI9 6V92-turbo with 9 inch roof raise & conversion in progress.
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AndyG
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« Reply #19 on: July 02, 2014, 06:56:43 AM »

As you pointed out, milky oil is usually caused by water being "mixed" with the oil.  How did you drain the hub?  By removing the hub cap?  As you know, water is heavier that oil and settles in the bottom of the hub.  Removing the cap may leave some liquid in the hub which means that some water will remain.  You have to get all of the liquid out of the hub which may require removing the hub from the spindle.  Repeated oil changes may do the trick also.
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Scott Bennett
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« Reply #20 on: July 06, 2014, 05:32:41 AM »

Interesting. Ok...so
In theory, immediately
After driving a length of time, I could remove the covers and drain the oil while it's still mixed with the water...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk. Clumsy fingers may contribute to mistakes.
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Scott & Heather
1984 MCI9 6V92-turbo with 9 inch roof raise & conversion in progress.
http://www.scottmichaelbennett.com/p/our-bus.html
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AndyG
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« Reply #21 on: July 06, 2014, 07:53:34 AM »

Interesting. Ok...so
In theory, immediately
After driving a length of time, I could remove the covers and drain the oil while it's still mixed with the water...
This should help.  It may still take a couple of tries.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #22 on: July 06, 2014, 10:49:06 AM »

There should be 1 bolt hole that will drain the hub finding it is another story
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krank
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« Reply #23 on: July 06, 2014, 08:51:31 PM »

Oil vs grease, hmmm, age old question. Some major semi trailer manufacturers are switching back to grease packed hubs FYI.

The moisture (milky oil) can come from several things. Driving at highways speeds heats up the hub through regular friction and through use of your brakes. As the hub cools it draws in cooler MOIST air thru the vent hole in the rubber fill plug in can accumulate moisture in the hub. In extreme conditions, moisture can even get sucked in through the wheel seal by driving into a deep puddle with hot wheel hubs.

Personally if you vehicle sits for extended periods or is used very limited my vote is to use a properly grease packed lubrication format. With an oil bath wheel end lube format the oil level naturally settles to the bottom of the hub leaving 80% of the seal to dry out.

BTW, if you wheel bearing oil has moisture in it, pulling the hub is the ONLY way to remove the contaminated oil from the small reservoir cavity in the hub between the inner and outer bearing sets. Also if there is moisture present, you definitely want to wash and inspect the bearings for pitting or corrosion/rust.

If using an oil bath format, pre fill the gallery in the hub between the bearings before you install the hub onto the spindle. not mandatory but it makes filling the hub to the correct level after installing the hub go a little quicker.

Another tip when you do the bearings on a driving axle is to jack up one side wait for 5 minutes then jack the opposite side, to allow the oil from the differential to fill the oil galleries in the hubs. once you do that let the unit sit level for awhile and re-check the differential oil level. Always remove and clean (or install a new) the diff vent if you have a seal failure.

Stemco vs CR ScotsealPlus?  CR ScotsealPlus hands down! Two CR seal failures in almost 20 years of servicing trucks and trailers. Prior to that, I would sometimes have two seal failures a year with Stemco. Again, my vote.
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Jim Eh.
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« Reply #24 on: July 07, 2014, 06:18:15 AM »

Second that.  CR at the top.  National seals at the bottom.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #25 on: July 07, 2014, 06:57:39 PM »

I use seals made by Meto in Vancouver Wa best seal on the market cost a little more but worth it to me
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belfert
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« Reply #26 on: July 07, 2014, 07:24:41 PM »

Is the issue of the top part of the bearings in oiled hubs rusting during long periods of sitting just an old wives tale?  My hubs were greased when I got them and I plan to leave them that way.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #27 on: July 07, 2014, 07:36:34 PM »

Maybe after a "golden" anniversary or two!
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Jim Eh.
1996 MC12
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Winnipeg, MB.
luvrbus
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« Reply #28 on: July 07, 2014, 07:37:43 PM »

Yes it is a old wife's tale if rust was a problem same would happen with the rear axle bearing,if the oil does it's job the oil film protects the bearing same as grease  IMO
« Last Edit: July 07, 2014, 07:41:07 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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bobofthenorth
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« Reply #29 on: July 07, 2014, 09:06:50 PM »

The only seal leaks we have ever had on the bus were Stemco seals.  I've been told that if they are put in correctly they work well but you couldn't prove it by me.
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R.J.(Bob) Evans
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